"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square, so that a wooden stock may be fitted temporarily if the iron stock is damaged, and that its proportions and form have been carefully considered and definately fixed." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Admiralty's Anchor

"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square,…

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in place by two chains, a and b, termed the cat-stopper and shank vainter respectively, each of which is fitted with a long link at one end. A bolt b, about 5 or 6 inches long, is fixed on the side of the cathead, on a hinge at its lower end; it is held in the upright position by another bolt c, which passes through the cathead, and is worked by a lever d; d is provided with a hole at the end for a lanyard, so that two or three men can pull it. This whole arrangement is termed a slip-stopper. A somewhat similar combination of bolts and levers is fitted close tot he bill-board D, e being a short bolt secured at its lower end with a hinge to the ship's side; and f a hooked lever which holds it in its upright position; f has a socket at its inboard end, to which a shifting arm, provided with a lanyard like the lever d, is fitted." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bower Anchor

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in…

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and the shackle are attached; d is the crown; de and df the arms; gg the palms or flukes; the pee, the bill or the point is the extreme end of the arm beyond the palm; the blade is the part of the arm at the back of the palm; h is the shackle or ring to which the cable is attahed; kl is the stock, placed at right angles to the plane or the arms and shank." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Common Anchor

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and…

A child's hands, one over the other.

Hands

A child's hands, one over the other.

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The shank is made in one forging, is of rectangular section, having a shoulder for the stock to fit against, and is increased both in thickness and area at the crown; the arms with the palms are forged in one piece, and then bent to the required shape; one of the arms is passed through a hole in the crown and is kept in position by a bolt screwed through the end of the crown, so that its point reaches a little way into an indent made for it in the round part at the back of the arms." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Martin's Anchor

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The…

A South American palm whose fibrous make up is used in industry and it also produces te coquilla nut.

Coquila Palm

A South American palm whose fibrous make up is used in industry and it also produces te coquilla nut.

A South American fan palm.

Cornahuba Palm

A South American fan palm.

"Date Palm is a genus of palms, the most important species of which is the common date palm, the palm tree of Scripture, a native of the N. half of Africa, the S. W. of Asia, and some parts of India, and of which the cultivation is no less wide, and still extending. Some parts of China produce large crops. The stem, which is straight and simple, reaches a height of 30 to 60 feet, and bears a head of 40 to 80 glaucous pinnated leaves, 8 to 10 feet long, and a number of branching spadices, each of which on the female tree bears 180 to 200 fruits. A bunch of dates weighs 20 or 25 pounds, so that an average year's crop may be reckoned at 300 to 600 pounds per tree, and the yield per acre at about 12 times that of corn. This is one of the most important and useful of all the palms. In Egypt, and generally in North Africa, Persia, and Arabia, dates form the principal food, and date palms the principal wealth of the people."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Date Palm

"Date Palm is a genus of palms, the most important species of which is the common date palm, the palm…

An African palm that produces ginger bread flavored fruit that is very fibrous.

Doum palm

An African palm that produces ginger bread flavored fruit that is very fibrous.

A starchy product obtained from the trunk of several species of a genus of palms named Sagus, and chiefly by S.Rumphii and S.Lavis. The tree is about 30 feet high, and from 18 to 22 inches in diameter.

Sago Palm

A starchy product obtained from the trunk of several species of a genus of palms named Sagus, and chiefly…

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the shank instead of passing through it. It is somewhat heavier than the stocks of other anchors; the arms are shorter than usual in proportion to the length of the shank, and are of a wedge shape, varying in sharpness from the throat to the head of the palms; the back part of the arms is parallel from palm to palm; the palm is double concave on the front, and has a small border at the edge for confining the soil through which it is dragged." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Rodger's Anchor

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the…

An illustration of an outdoor scene in ancient Arabia. Pictured are camels, shepherds, and others going about their miscellaneous tasks.

A Scene In Arabia

An illustration of an outdoor scene in ancient Arabia. Pictured are camels, shepherds, and others going…

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat larger at the center than at the ends, and is made fork-shaped at one end to receive the arms; the arms are in one piece, and are connected to the shank by a bolt passing through their center." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Trotman's Anchor

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat…