"No man in the United States has been written about more than Henry Ward Beecher, but the main facts of his life are told in a few words." —The Popular Cyclopedia, 1888

Henry Ward Beecher

"No man in the United States has been written about more than Henry Ward Beecher, but the main facts…

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married Amelia Shipley, daughter of the Dean of St Asaph. He was made prebendary of St Asaph in 1812, appointed Bampton lecturer for 1815, preacher at Lincoln's Inn in 1822, and Bishop of Calcutta in January 1823. Before sailing for India he received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford. In India, Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably - not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East. He toured the country, consecrating churches, founding schools and discharging other Christian duties. Heber was a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy. His fame rests mainly on his hymns.

Bishop Reginald Heber

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married…

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 – March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went to college with the intention of becoming a priest, but his scholarship attracted the attention of King James I. Herbert served in parliament for two years. In 1630, in his late thirties he gave up his secular ambitions and took holy orders in the Church of England, spending the rest of his life as a rector of the little parish of St. Andrew Bemerton, near Salisbury.

George Herbert's Rector House, Bemerton

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 – March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went…

John Knox (c. 1510 – 24 November 1572) was a Scottish clergyman and leader of the Protestant Reformation who is considered the founder of the Presbyterian denomination. He was educated at the University of St Andrews and worked as a notary-priest. Influenced by early church reformers such as George Wishart, he joined the movement to reform the Scottish church. He was caught up in the ecclesiastical and political events that involved the murder of Cardinal Beaton in 1546 and the intervention of the regent of Scotland, Mary of Guise. He was taken prisoner by French forces the following year and exiled to England on his release in 1549.

John Knox

John Knox (c. 1510 – 24 November 1572) was a Scottish clergyman and leader of the Protestant Reformation…

Resembling a starling, the rose-colored pastor can often be found living in the vicinity of livestock, where it mounts their backs and eats the insects imbedded in their hair.

Rose-Colored Pastor

Resembling a starling, the rose-colored pastor can often be found living in the vicinity of livestock,…

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On 20 September 1871 he was murdered on the island of Nukapu in the Solomon Islands, where he had landed alone. Natives killed him as revenge against the abduction of some natives by white men months earlier. His death became a cause celebre in England and increased interest both in missionary work and in improvement of the working conditions in Melanesia. His life is celebrated in the Church of England as a saintly one.

Bishop Patteson's House, Norfolk Island

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr.…

"A shepherd's crook. On account of its connection with pastoral life, the crook is often seen in works of ancient art, in the hands of Pan, Satyrs, Fauns, and shepherds. It was also the usual attribute of Thalia, as the muse of pastoral poetry." — Smith, 1873

Pedum

"A shepherd's crook. On account of its connection with pastoral life, the crook is often seen in works…

A pulpit (from Latin pulpitum "scaffold", "platform", "stage") is a small elevated platform from which a member of the clergy delivers a sermon in a house of worship.

Pulpit

A pulpit (from Latin pulpitum "scaffold", "platform", "stage") is a small elevated platform from which…

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was the founder of the (Evangelical) Arminian Methodist movement. Methodism began as an unflattering nickname of the "Holy Club" at Oxford University founded by Charles Wesley but led by brother John. Methodism was well advanced in England through George Whitefield who had taken over the responsibility of the Holy Club while the Wesley brothers were in Savannah, Georgia British North America. On John Wesley's return to England in 1737 he publically criticised Whitefield for his evangelical preaching.

John Wesley

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was…

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA (1789; 1795–1836), the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania (1787–1836), and the second United States Senate Chaplain (appointed December 9, 1790).

William White

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth…

George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 – September 30, 1770), was a preacher in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. He first took to preaching in the open air on Hanham Mount, Kingswood, in southeast Bristol. A crowd of 20,000 people gathered to hear him. Even larger crowds – Whitefield himself estimated 30,000 – met him in Cambuslang in 1742. Benjamin Franklin once attended a revival meeting in Philadelphia and was greatly impressed with Whitefield's ability to deliver a message to such a large audience.

George Whitefield

George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 – September 30, 1770), was a preacher in the Church of England…

John Winthrop (12 January 1588 – 26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World, joined the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1629 and was elected their governor in October 1629. Between 1639 and 1648 he was voted out of governorship and re-elected a total of 12 times. Although Winthrop was a respected political figure, he was criticized for his obstinacy regarding the formation of a general assembly in 1634.

John Winthrop

John Winthrop (12 January 1588 – 26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World,…