"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit of General Price." —Leslie, 1896

Freemont's troops

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit…

An illustration showing an insignia for the French-English War.

French-English War

An illustration showing an insignia for the French-English War.

A gabion is an open cylinder made of brushwood, canvas, wire-netting, or iron bands used in fortification. Filled with loose earth, gabions are placed on end, in tiers, to form a wall behind which earth can be piled. They are usually constructed on location and made up of whatever materials are on hand.

Gabion

A gabion is an open cylinder made of brushwood, canvas, wire-netting, or iron bands used in fortification.…

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment and gun was in place. Some were in the broad, open field and others under the cover of the woods. The day was intensely warm, and many of the men, worn out with their previous day's fighting, lack of sleep and toilsome march, had already thrown themselves upon the ground and were indulging in a short slumber, when a sharp volley and then the roar of artillery announced that the Confederates had opened the fight. Their shells burst in front of the farmhouse which General Morell had made his headquarters. The Federal batteries, after some little delay, replied and for an hour this artillery duel and shelling the woods continued. It was not till near three o'clock in the afternoon that the engagement became general, and then the battle raged for four hours with unexampled fury. As though by common consent, there was a pause now; but it did not last long, for the enemy had evidently received large re-enforcements, as the whole Federal line was attacked, with a vigor which showed that those who made it were fresh men. To prevent defeat, General Porter sent for re-enforcements, for under the additional pressure the Federal troops were giving way. Fortunately, General Slocum's division came to the rescue, and with it Generals Palmer, French and Meagher with their brigades and two bodies of cavalry. This changed the character of the struggle. Meagher's gallant gellows, coats off and sleeves rolled up, charged the enemy and drove them back. General Palmer's men and Duryee's Zouaves also went in with valor, and finally the Confederates rolled back like a retreating wave. This was the close of the day's fight. Toward the end the Federals had fifty-four regiments on the field, numbering about 36,000 men." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gaines's Mill

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment…

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans, Genoese, Pisans, and Venetians.

The Venetian galley was generally three-masted, and was usually around 160 feet long, 32 feet broad, and supplied with sixty-four oars, to each of which were chained six or seven slaves. Such galleys were equipped with powerful rams used for boarding and sinking enemy ships. Criminals in France and elsewhere were frequently condemned to serve at the oars in these craft. In modern speech, the term "galley" refers the common kitchen of a ship.

Galley (ship)

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans,…

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer <em>South Carolina</em>, on Monday afternoon, August 5th, 1861." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Galveston

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer South Carolina, on…

"General James A. Garfield was the twentieth President of the United States, born in Orange, Cuyahoga County, O., November 19th, 1831, died in Elberon, N. J., September 19th, 1881. General Garfield was involved in the Civil War and was inaugurated President of the United States in 1881, and was shot by a disappointed office seeker (Guiteau), July 2nd, the same year." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

General James A. Garfield

"General James A. Garfield was the twentieth President of the United States, born in Orange, Cuyahoga…

The Gauntlet is a piece of protective armor for the hand, dating back to the 12th century. The first gauntlets were leather covered gloves with an unarticulated metal back. They evolved from the chain mail bag, which , in the 12th century, terminated at the sleeves of the hauberk. The gauntlet of the 14th century had separate, but unjointed fingers. This gauntlet was superseded by the 'mitten'.

Gauntlet

The Gauntlet is a piece of protective armor for the hand, dating back to the 12th century. The first…

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are few sights more picturesque than a detachment of cavalry winding along the road to some quiet little village. Nature and man seem then so little in harmony that the contradiction becomes strikingly attractive. Our illustration represents a scene of this kind- a detachment of Federal cavalry, sent by order of General Banks, reconnoitring in the neighborhood of Hyattstown, a post village of Montgomery County, Md., and situated on Bennett's Creek, about thirty-six miles to the northwest of Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Cavalry of General Banks

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are…

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie, 1896

March of General Banks

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie,…

"Headquarters of General Butterfield, near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Headquarters of General Butterfield

"Headquarters of General Butterfield, near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va." —Leslie, 1896

A battle between English and French forces in Quebec.

Death of General Wolfe at Quebec

A battle between English and French forces in Quebec.

A rebus from words of an eulogy adopted by Congress, "First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen,"

George Washington Rebus

A rebus from words of an eulogy adopted by Congress, "First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts…

"The monument stands on a wooded hillside opposite Bingen and overlooking the Rhine valley. The great base, 82 feet high, supports an impressive figure of Germania, 34 feet high, with the imperial crown and the laurel-wreathed sword. On the side of the pedestal facing the river is a design symbolizing 'The Watch on the Rhine.' The other sides of the pedestal bear designs representing various scenes in the Franco-German War."&mdash;Webster, 1920

The German National Monument

"The monument stands on a wooded hillside opposite Bingen and overlooking the Rhine valley. The great…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"General Granger, born in New York, in 1821, died in Santa Fe, N. M., January 10th, 1876, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1845; took part in the principal battles of the Mexican War. When the Civil War began he served on the staff of General McClellan in Ohio; then in Missouri; was brevetted major for gallant services at Wilson's Creek; and on September 2nd, 1861, became colonel of the Second Michigan Cavalry; on March 26th, 1862 he was made a brigadier general, and commanded the cavalry in the operations that led to the fall of Corinth. He became a major general of volunteers on September 17th, 1862. He distinguished himself in the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. On January 15th, 1866, he was mustered out of the volunteer service." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Gordon Granger

"General Granger, born in New York, in 1821, died in Santa Fe, N. M., January 10th, 1876, was graduated…

General Ulysses S. Grant of the Union Army.

General Ulysses Grant

General Ulysses S. Grant of the Union Army.

General Grant, eighteenth President of the United States, born at Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27th, 1822; died on Mount McGregor, near Saratoga, N. Y., July 23rd, 1885.

Ulysses Grant

General Grant, eighteenth President of the United States, born at Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio,…

(1723-1788) French military leader that assisted with the Revolutionary war

Count De Grasse

(1723-1788) French military leader that assisted with the Revolutionary war

"The Great Bakery for the United States Army at the Capitol, Washington, D. C.- sketched by our special artist. The public buildings in Washington, during the threatened invasion by the Confederates, were barricaded and fortified. So great was the apprehension of a raid upon the city, that the passageways of the Treasury and the Captiol wre defended by howitzers. The iron plates cast for the dome of the Capitol were set up as breastworks between the columns, where they were supported by heavy timbers. The statuary and the pictures were protected by heaving planking; and the basement of the building was used as a kitchen. When the regiments began to pour in, the public buildings were given as quarters to the troops which came to defend them. The basement of the Capitol, which we illustrate, became first a storehouse, and then a bakery." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Great Bakery

"The Great Bakery for the United States Army at the Capitol, Washington, D. C.- sketched by our special…

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, October 4th, 1861. On Friday, october 4th, 1861, Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, was ordered to shell a barn, in which there was every reason to conclude a large quantity of Confederate provisions and supplies was stored. The major, therefore, placed a Parrott gun on the heights of Great Falls, and threw a few shells across the Potomac. Several of them fell into the barn, which had the effect of unhousing a number of Confederate cavalry, who rode with all speed for the neighboring woods." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Great Falls

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West,…

Armor used by the ancient Greeks in battle.

Grecian Armor

Armor used by the ancient Greeks in battle.

A Greek shield.

Greek Shield

A Greek shield.

"From a Greek vase of about the time of the battle of Marathon."&mdash;Webster, 1913

Greek Soldiers in Arms

"From a Greek vase of about the time of the battle of Marathon."—Webster, 1913

"Desperate engagement, april 24th, 1862, between the United States gunboat "Varuna," Commander Boggs, and the Confederate steam ram "J. C. Breckinridge," and the gunboat "Governor Moore." Captain Boggs of the "Varuna," finding that the Confederate ram "J. C. Breckinridge" was about to run into him, put the vessel in such a position that in being damaged he could repay it with interest. On came the ram, all clad with iron about the bow, and hit the "Varuna" in the port waist, cutting and crushing in her side. she dropped alongside and cleared out to butt again. She hit the "Varuna" a second time, and while in a sinking condition the "Varuna" poured her 8-inch shells into her so fast that the Confederate was set on fire and driven on shore." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Gunboat collision

"Desperate engagement, april 24th, 1862, between the United States gunboat "Varuna," Commander Boggs,…

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito Fleet, under Commodore Tatnall, near Fort Pulaski, Savannah River, January 28th, 1862. Our artist described this spirited sketch as follows: 'On Monday night Lieutenant Barnes was dispatched in the <em>Ottawa's</em> gig to scout up the creek and report. Passing the piles with ease, he pulled silently up the stream with muffled oars, and with no opposition succeeded in reaching the mouth of the creek where it enters the Savannah River. He came upon the fleet of Tatnall lying there, and approached near enough to see the watch on deck. As he was too near them in case they discovered him, and as he had accomplished the object of reconnoisance, he returned and reported the facts to Captain Davis. On Tuesday forenoon Tatnall's fleet was again discovered standing down the Savannah. We beat to quarters, and when the flagship had got within range we opened on her with an eleven-inch gun from the <em>Ottawa</em>. The signal for action having been given, the gunboats opened fire. The Confederates returned a few shots, which fell short. The engagement lasted nearly two hours, during which time the Confederate Flagship was struck three times, seriously damaging her. One eleven-inch shell struck her on her wheelhouse, and so much disabled her as to compel the commander to signal for assistance, and one steamer turned round and went to her aid. The other three steamed down toward Fort Pulaski faster than they ever went before.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Gunboat engagement

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito…

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan before Yorktown, April 26th, 1862. On the morning of Saturday, April 26th, 1862, Company H of the first Massachusetts Volunteers, led by Camptain Carruth, made a most brilliant charge on a Confederate redoubt, and took it at the point of the bayonet. It was defended by a company of the First Virginia Regiment, who fought with that Old Dominion valor which, to use a phrase probably heard before, "was worthy of a better cause." The Federals were exposed to a most galling fire from the instant they left the shelter of the woods until they reached the brink of the deep ditch fronting the parapet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Company H

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan…

Halberd, from the time of Henry VIII.

Halberd (Time of Henry VIII)

Halberd, from the time of Henry VIII.

Halberd (Charles II)

Halberd, (Charles II)

Halberd (Charles II)

Double-axed Halberd (Charles I)

Halberd, Double-axed (Charles I)

Double-axed Halberd (Charles I)

Halberd, Do, with fleur-de-lis (Henry VII)

Halberd, fleur-de-lis

Halberd, Do, with fleur-de-lis (Henry VII)

General Winfield Scott Hancock.

General Winfield Scott Hancock

General Winfield Scott Hancock.

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Hand with Gun

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the…

This illustration shows three different views of a Handley-Page Twin Liberty Motored Type O 400 Bomber.

Handley-Page Twin Liberty Motored Type O 400 Bomber

This illustration shows three different views of a Handley-Page Twin Liberty Motored Type O 400 Bomber.

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"General Hayes was the nineteenth President of the United States, born in Delaware, O., October 4th, 1822; died in Fremont, O., January 7th, 1893. Hayes was governor of Ohio three times and was a general in the Civil War." —Leslie, 1896

General Rutherford B. Hayes

"General Hayes was the nineteenth President of the United States, born in Delaware, O., October 4th,…

An illustration showing the Battle of Abraham Heights.

Battle of the Heights of Abraham

An illustration showing the Battle of Abraham Heights.

""The crested Achilles was pressing on in his chariot." Some idea of the ancient crests may be formed from the following woodcuts, selected from ancient gems." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Crested helmets

""The crested Achilles was pressing on in his chariot." Some idea of the ancient crests may be formed…

King's full-faced helmet, with six bars.

Heraldry, King

King's full-faced helmet, with six bars.

The Indians and the Highlander. Caption below illustration: "The Scotchman requested that the broad sword should be given to the most alert and most vigorous person in the assembly; and laying bare his neck after he had rubbed it over with magic signs , and muttered a few inarticulate words, he called out, with a loud voice and cheerful air."

Indians and the Highlander

The Indians and the Highlander. Caption below illustration: "The Scotchman requested that the broad…

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces under General Sherman, 1861-2. Our illustration of the Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., embrace the following points of interest: Signal Station for telegraphing to beaufort, Bay Point, etc; post office, formerly old confederate barn; Captan Hascell's office and storehouses; old Confederate building; storehouse for ammunition; unfinished dwelling; boxes filled with shot and shell; heavy shot; temporary wharf; siege gun-carriages; building permanent wharf; heavy columbiads; armories department, and part of the stone fleet. This sketch cannot fail to be generally interesting, more especially to those who had friends or relatives in this expedition, or participated in it themselves. The buildings were unpleasantly significant to the secessionists that the Federal troops had come to stay." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Hilton Head

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces…

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces under General Sherman, 1861-2. Our illustration of the Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., embrace the following points of interest: Commissary's Quarters, built by the Confederates; Post Sutler's, built by the Confederates; Camp of the Eighth Main Regiment; butcher's yard; Camp of the Third New Hampshire regiment; Camp of the Forty-eighth New York regiment; Camp of the Forty-seventh New York regiment; Provost Marshal Major Beard's quarters and Provost Marshal's guard; General Viele's headquarter's; General Sherman's headquarters; Captain Pothouse's (Assistant Adjutant-general) headquarters; lodging house, built by the Confederates; bakery; unfinished building; Captain Saxton's office, and other Government offices, formerly Generals Drayton and Wright's headquarters." —Leslie, 1896

Hilton Head

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces…

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

Horses and Wagons

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

Brass howitzer.

Howitzer

Brass howitzer.

"General Hunter, born in Washington, D. C., July 21st, 1802, died there, February 2nd, 1886, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822; appointed second lieutenant in the Fifth Infantry; promoted first lieutenant in 1828, and became a captain in the First Dragoons in 1833. He resigned his commission in 1836, and engaged in business in Chicago. He re-entered the military service as a paymaster, with the rank of major, in March, 1842. On May 14th, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the Sixth United States Cavalry, and three days later was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers. He commanded the main column of McDowell's army in the Manassas campaign, and was severely wounded at Bull Run, July 21st, 1861. He was made a major general of volunteers, August 13th, 1861; served under General Fremont in Missouri, and on November 2nd succeeded him in the command of the Western Department. In March, 1862, General Hunter was transferred to the Department of the South, with headquarters at Port Royal, S. C. In May, 1864, he was placed in command of the Department of West Virginia. He defeated considerable force at Piedmont on June 5th. He was brevetted major general, United States Army, march 13th, 1865, and mustered out of the volunteer service in January, 1866." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

General David Hunter

"General Hunter, born in Washington, D. C., July 21st, 1802, died there, February 2nd, 1886, was graduated…

A collection of Native American war clubs, weapons used for war.

Indian War Clubs

A collection of Native American war clubs, weapons used for war.

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Infernal machine designed by the Confederates to destroy the Federal Flotilla in the Potomac discovered by Captain budd of the steamer "Resolute." An infernal machine designed by the Confederates to blow up the "Pawnee" and the vessels of the Potomac flotilla, which was set adrift near Aquia Creek, was picked up on the 7th of July, 1861, floating toward the "Pawnee." The following description of the article was sent to the Navy Department: "Two large eighty-gallon oil casks, perfectly watertight, acting as buoys, connected by twenty-five fathoms of three-and-a-half-inch-rope, buoyed with large squares of cork, every two feet secured to casks by iron handles. A heavy bomb of boiler iron, fitted with a brass tap and filled with powder, was suspended to the casks six feet under water. On top of the cask was a wooden box, with fuse in a gutta-percha tube. In the centre of the cork was a platform with a great length of fuse coiled away, occupying the middle of the cask." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Infernal machine

"Infernal machine designed by the Confederates to destroy the Federal Flotilla in the Potomac discovered…

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal mortar boats and gunboats, March 17th, 1862. From a sketch by our special artist Mr. H. Lovie, on board the gunboat "Conestoga." On the 16th of March, 1862, the mortar fleet and the gunboats, consisting of the <em>Cincinnati, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Silver Wave, Carondelet, Mount City, Conestoga, Louisville, Rob Roy, Alps, Wilson, Lake Erie, Great Western</em> and <em>Torrence</em>, and nine mortar boats, arrived near the Point. These were accompanied by several tugboats. On the same day they opened fire, which, after some hours' delay, was returned by the Confederate batteries. This continued for several days, with very small loss to the Federal side, owing to the iron casing of the vessels engaged, and a superior range." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Island No. 10

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal…

"Repulse of the Confederates at James Island, near Charleston, S. C., June 10th, 1862, in the attempt to capture the pickets of General Wright's division. Our correspondent wrote: "General Benham conceived the design of making a dash across James Island and taking Fort Johnson by surprise. After due deliberation General Hunter agreed to his plan, and troops were transported from Port Royal and taken up Stono River, which was occupied by our gunboats. Two camps were formed on the shore of James Island, about two miles apart, one commanded by General Stevens, and the other by General Wright. Between these camps and Charleston a large force of Confederates, said to be eight thousand men, under command of Colonel Lamar, was stationed to check the advance of the Federals. The advance of this force held possession of a powerful earthwork, about two miles from the Federal camp. The first collision between the hostile forces took place on the 4th of June, in which the Confederates captured about twenty of our men. Later in the day we drove them from their position, and captured a battery of four guns. Things remained quiet until the 10th, when a reconnoissance in force was made for the purpose of advancing our picket lines and taking an earthern fort the Confederates had erected at a place called Secessionville, whose guns threw their shells into our camps, and even into the river where the gunboats were lying, while they were beyond our range. On the afternoon of the 10th the Confederates attacked General Wright's pickets, and were repulsed with heavy loss, our loss being very slight."" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

James Island

"Repulse of the Confederates at James Island, near Charleston, S. C., June 10th, 1862, in the attempt…