An ancient southern constellation, the Southern Fish.

Piscis Austrinus

An ancient southern constellation, the Southern Fish.

A porpoise with a longer, sharper nose. Usually 6 feet in length.

Dolphin

A porpoise with a longer, sharper nose. Usually 6 feet in length.

"In its habits resembles the manatees, but it exceeds them in size, full grown individuals measuring eighteen or twenty feet in length. " — S. G. Goodrich, 1885

Dugong

"In its habits resembles the manatees, but it exceeds them in size, full grown individuals measuring…

An animal with remarkable for its one great tusk.

Narwhal

An animal with remarkable for its one great tusk.

A small cetacean that is related to whales and dolphins.

The Porpoise

A small cetacean that is related to whales and dolphins.

The vertebra of the whale. (c) body; (n n ) arches enclosing the spinal cord.

Whale vertebra

The vertebra of the whale. (c) body; (n n ) arches enclosing the spinal cord.

A scene from the nursery rhyme, "Very Like a Whale."

Very Like a Whale

A scene from the nursery rhyme, "Very Like a Whale."

A scene from the nursery rhyme, "Very Like a Whale."

Very Like a Whale

A scene from the nursery rhyme, "Very Like a Whale."

Whales have lungs which require them to surface in order to get oxygen.

Whale

Whales have lungs which require them to surface in order to get oxygen.

Whale, a name applied to any in the order Cetacean.

Whale

Whale, a name applied to any in the order Cetacean.

"Whale is a name that may be taken as equivalent to Cetacean, and applied to any member of that order of mammals, which inculdes two great sets: the toothed whales, such as sperm whale and dolphin, and the whale-bone whales, such as right whale and rorqual, in which the teeth are only embryonic. The order Cetacea is usually divided into three sub-orders: (1) the Mystacoceti or Balænoidea, baleen or whalebone whales; (2) the Odontoceti or Delphinoidea, toothed whales; and (3) the Archæoceti or extinct Zeuglodonts. The differences between the extant sub-orders are so great that any idea of the close relationship must be abandoned; their common ancestry must be far back, and indeed it is doubtful whether our classification might not be brought nearer the truth by recognizing two distinct orders. Less specialized than the modern types are the extinct Zeuglododonts of the Eocene period, but it is by no means certain that they should be included within the order Cetacea."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Whale

"Whale is a name that may be taken as equivalent to Cetacean, and applied to any member of that order…

The common name of animals belonging to the order cetacea, with which are included the porpoise and the dolphin. They are formed somewhat like fishes, and like them live in the sea.

Whale

The common name of animals belonging to the order cetacea, with which are included the porpoise and…

An illustration of people harvesting a whale.

Whale Harvesting

An illustration of people harvesting a whale.

An illustration of a whale skeleton.

Whale Skeleton

An illustration of a whale skeleton.

"The Whale-Louse, <em>Cyamus seti</em>, is found on whales along our coasts." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Whale-louse

"The Whale-Louse, Cyamus seti, is found on whales along our coasts." — Goodrich, 1859