The 1861-1865 Civil War Other Events ClipArt gallery includes 133 illustrations of other important events that occurred during the American Civil War.

Confederate General Lee surrendering to Union General Grant.

Lee Surrenders to Grant

Confederate General Lee surrendering to Union General Grant.

"Lee's army crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, in scows guided by wires, after the invasion of Maryland."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lee's Army

"Lee's army crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, in scows guided by wires, after the invasion of Maryland."—…

Grant and Lee signing the terms of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.

Lee's Surrender

Grant and Lee signing the terms of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.

An illustration of a meeting between General Lee and soldiers.

Meeting with General Lee

An illustration of a meeting between General Lee and soldiers.

Picture from when General Lee surrendered his army April 9th.

Surrender of Lee

Picture from when General Lee surrendered his army April 9th.

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey, four miles from Corinth, May 5th, 1862- General Hurlbut's division forcing their way through the mud. Our illustration cannot fail to fasten the grand fact of mud firmly on the reader's mind. Our special artist, Mr. Lovie, carefully made the sketch on the spot at Lick Creek Bottom, when General Hurbut's division of Halleck's grand army was advancing from Pittsburg Landing to Monterey. In his letter he said: "Lick Creek Bottom is part of the road between Pittsburg Landing and Monterey. The hills on both sides are clayey ground, and the creek rises rapidly after every rain. On Monday, May 5th, an attempt was made to pull through the cannon and wagon train, but the mud was too deep, and the result was that in a few hours the bottom was filled with wagons and mules, hopelessly mired, and waiting for dry weather to be dug out. A moment's reflection will enable you to get a faint idea of the enormous task before us. The bottom land is very deep and rich, and only those who have tested the adherent and adhering qualities of this soil can appreciate its glorious consistency and persistency thoroughly. I have had considerable experiences of mud, but, in all my rides, or, rather, wallowings, I have seldom experienced such difficulty in getting my horse along, and I only succeeded by driving my spurs so vehemently into his poor sides, that he made those desperate plunges which carried us through." —Leslie, 1896

Lick Creek Bottom

"Advance of Federal troops on Corinth- the Carnival of Mud- scene at Lick Creek Bottom, between Pittsburg…

This illustration shows the assassination of President Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth.

Lincoln Assassination

This illustration shows the assassination of President Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth.

A diagram of the box occupied by President Lincoln in the Ford Theater when he was assassinated.

Diagram of Box Occupied by President Lincoln in Theatre

A diagram of the box occupied by President Lincoln in the Ford Theater when he was assassinated.

An illustration depicting the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

An illustration depicting the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln's death, after being shot by John Wilkes Booth.

The Death-Bed of President Lincoln

Lincoln's death, after being shot by John Wilkes Booth.

"Sherman's campaign in Georgia- Federal forces at Jonesborough destroying the Macon Railraod."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Macon Railroad

"Sherman's campaign in Georgia- Federal forces at Jonesborough destroying the Macon Railraod."— Frank…

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Man walking dogs

"Man walking dogs in the 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened…

"The war in Virginia- General Hooker's army marching past Manassas, Va., June, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Manassas

"The war in Virginia- General Hooker's army marching past Manassas, Va., June, 1863."— Frank Leslie,…

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate invaders- scene on the march."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Daughters of Maryland

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate…

"The invasion of Maryland- citizens of Baltimore barricading the streets, Monday evening, June 29th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Invasion of Maryland

"The invasion of Maryland- citizens of Baltimore barricading the streets, Monday evening, June 29th,…

April 5, 1862. The General is arriving to take personal command of the Federal Army in its advance on Yorktown. He is enthusiastically received by the troops. On March 11, 1862 the president issued an order relieving General McClellan of part of the responsibility heretofore devolving upon him. The order stated that "General McClellan, having personally taken the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac, until otherwise ordered, he is relieved from the command of the other military departments he retaining the command of the Department of the Potomac."

Arrival of General McClellan

April 5, 1862. The General is arriving to take personal command of the Federal Army in its advance on…

"General McGowen addressing the Thirty-Fifth Abbeville (S. C.) Volunteers, in front of the Charleston Hotel. The gallant band of Confederates known as the Abbeville Volunteers was composed of a hundred of the wealthiest citizens of the district. A number of them were accompanied by their negro servants, as the barons of old were by their armed vassals. General McGowen made a strong speech, and was loudly cheered."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General McGowen

"General McGowen addressing the Thirty-Fifth Abbeville (S. C.) Volunteers, in front of the Charleston…

Thomas Francis Meagher (August 3, 1823 – July 1, 1867) was an Irish nationalist, a Union Army general during the American Civil War, and American politician.

Thomas Francis Meagher

Thomas Francis Meagher (August 3, 1823 – July 1, 1867) was an Irish nationalist, a Union Army…

The activity of the Confederates on the Potomac and the confluent rivers was almost incredible. In one night some point hitherto defenseless was made to bristle with cannon, and the first intimation of its locality was a leaden messenger winging its way on its mission of death. A party of the Tenth Regiment of New York Zuoaves, while out scouting through a dense wood, came suddenly in sight of Messech's Point, and there beheld the Confederates at work upon an almost completed battery, which had sprung up with magical rapidity.

Discovery of a Confederate Battery at Messech's Point

The activity of the Confederates on the Potomac and the confluent rivers was almost incredible. In one…

"Federal troops marching through Second Street, New Fernandina, Fla. Our sketch of New Fernandina in 1862 shows the principal business street in the city, called Second Street. There seemed to be quite a joke in numbering streets where there were not half a dozen in the place; but the spirit of imitation was strong, and as Philadelphia and New York, with their thousands of blocks, are simplified and rendered more easily fundable by the aid of arithmetic, so must be the villages of the South." —Leslie, 1896

New Fernandina

"Federal troops marching through Second Street, New Fernandina, Fla. Our sketch of New Fernandina in…

"Occupation of Norfolk, VA., by the Federal troops- view of the city- Federal vessels at anchor." —Leslie, 1896

Occupation of Norfolk

"Occupation of Norfolk, VA., by the Federal troops- view of the city- Federal vessels at anchor." —Leslie,…

"The enthusiasm of the Northern armies- re-enlistment of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Financial tests convinced the supporters of the rebellion here and in Europe of one great fact, that the people of the North had faith in the United States Government, and that the people of the Southern States had no faith in their government, set up by a knot of disappointed politicians. While Alabama troops were shooting down Kentuckians who refused to re-enlist, the Federal Army almost unanimously re-enlisted. Hence the difference. There was no want of faith in the Federal cause, the Government, or success. In some corps almost all the regiments re-enlisted; in the Seventeenth Army Corps thirty-nine took their stand as verterans. We give artistically a view of this army enthusiasm."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Northern armies

"The enthusiasm of the Northern armies- re-enlistment of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Financial tests…

"The siege of Charleston- ordnance depot, Morris Island, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Ordnance Depot

"The siege of Charleston- ordnance depot, Morris Island, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Landing of Federal troops at Parkersburg, Western Virginia. Parkersburg, Va., in 1861 was a thriving post village on the Ohio River, situated at the mouth of the Little Kanawha River, and altogether presented a most picturesque appearance, the houses being very neatly built and well placed. It is about one hundred miles from Wheeling and two hundred and fifty-eight miles from Richmond in a direct W.N.W. line. It contained a courthouse, churches of several denominations, a bank, a printing office and several steam mills. Its population was nearly four thousand. It has excellent turnpike roads to Staunton and Winchester and the Northwestern branch of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad terminates here. Our view represents the arrival of Federal troops previous to the total clearance of the Kanawha Valley from the presence of Wise and his Confederate troops." —Leslie, 1896

Landing at Parkersburg

"Landing of Federal troops at Parkersburg, Western Virginia. Parkersburg, Va., in 1861 was a thriving…

"The invasion of Pennsylvania- working on the fortifications near Harrisburg, Pa., June 16th, 1863. Our artist gives a view of the citizens of Harrisburg laboring on the fortifications of that city, showing that tardy but ineffective preparations made. Meanwhile the New York regiments all accustomed to military drill and evolution, some already tried by actual service, were hurrying to the scene of action; and on these men, till the War Department could assign regulars or volunteers, depended the safety of Pennsylvania."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Invasion of Pennsylvania

"The invasion of Pennsylvania- working on the fortifications near Harrisburg, Pa., June 16th, 1863.…

An illustration of a soldier planting a United States flag in the ground.

Planting of US Flag

An illustration of a soldier planting a United States flag in the ground.

"The Pontoon bridge 'On The March'- the pontoon wagons on their way from Aquia Creek to the Rappahannock. Our correspondent wrote, under date of December 6th, 1862: 'Affairs in Virginia are assuming a portentous significance. General Burnside's army is concentrated on the north bank of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg, and the railway connecting his camps with his base of supplies at Aquia Creek, on the Potomac, is completed. A number of gunboats have ascended the Rappahannock to within fifteen miles of Fredericksburg, and will probably ascend the river quite to that point. Pontoon bridges and other appliances for crossing the river have also reached the Federal army, and the conditions for a speedy advance are nearly complete. Meanwhile, and in consequence of the delay of the Federal forces, itself the result of a rapid change of base without adequate advance provision, the Confederates have succeeded in concentrating their army in front of General Burnside, where they have been and still are busy in erecting fortifications to oppose his passage of the river.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon bridge

"The Pontoon bridge 'On The March'- the pontoon wagons on their way from Aquia Creek to the Rappahannock.…

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the Confederate General Jackson and his army." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon bridge

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the…

"Army of the Potomac recrossing the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg to Falmouth, on the night of Monday, December 15th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Army of the Potomac

"Army of the Potomac recrossing the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg to Falmouth, on the night of Monday,…

"Advance of the Army of the Potomac. Occupation of Winchester, VA., and the abandoned Confederate Fortifications, by a detachment of General Banks's Deivision of the Federal Army, consisting of the brigades of Generals Hamilton and Williams, March 12th, 1862. Our sketch represents the advance of the Federal troops upon the City of Winchester, and is thus described by our correspondent: 'A portion of General Banks's Division, under General Gorman, occupied the town of Berryville, VA., on the 11th. There were five hundred of the Confederate cavalry in the place, but upon the Third New York Cavalry, properly supported by artillery and infantry, charging them, they fled in confusion toward Winchester. During the night the pickets of General Gorman came in contact with a portion of Colonel Ashby's Confederate cavalry, and were compelled to fall back, but the general made a reconnoissance in force to within two miles of Winchester, and, charging upon the Confederates dispersed them, taking several prisoners, and killing or wounding four of the Confederates. This reconnoissance sealed the fate of Winchester. The enemy were blinded and misled by the movement of our troops, and they commenced the evacuation of the place on the afternoon of the 12th. General Hamilton advanced from Bunker hill, the Michigan Cavalry heading the column. The Confederate Cavalry, one thousand two hundred strong, and supported by a section of artillery, gave battle at five o'clock in the afternoon. Our cavalry was supported by the First maryland Infantry, and a battery of artillery. The fight was a short one. The Confederates fled, leaving their guns behind them, and at daylight on the 12th our troops entered the city as the rear guard of the enemy was flying out of it.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Army of the Potomac

"Advance of the Army of the Potomac. Occupation of Winchester, VA., and the abandoned Confederate Fortifications,…

"A street in Harper's Ferry, VA., during the passage of the Potomac by the Federal troops from Maryland, October 24th, 1862. We give a specimen of the grotesque in war. Experience proves that where there is much excitement there is always a rollicking gayety in proportion to the excitement. The terrible stimulus of war constantly produced scenes which almost approached those of a carnival. Among the younger of the Federal soldiers this was very apparent, more especially among some of the zouave regiments." —Leslie, 1896

Passage of the Potomac

"A street in Harper's Ferry, VA., during the passage of the Potomac by the Federal troops from Maryland,…

"General Banks's Division recrossing the Potomac from Williamsport, Md., to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson- the band of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers playing the National Airs on the Virginia shore. The retreat of General Banks was, under the circumstances of the case, a great military necessity, and admirably conducted; but, directly the pressure was removed, he returned to the Valley to drive out the invader. Our illustration is of the impressive scene of recrossing the Potomac on the mission of vengeance and patriotism."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Recrossing the Potomac

"General Banks's Division recrossing the Potomac from Williamsport, Md., to attack the Confederate army…

"Presentation of colors to the Twentieth United States [African American] Infantry, Colonel Bartram, at the Union League Clubhouse, New York, March 5th, 1864. The Twentieth Regiment, United States [African American] Troops, left Riker's Island at nine o'clock on the 5th of March, 1864, on board the steamer <em>John Romer</em>, and were conveyed to the foot of Twenty-first Street, East River, New York, where they were disembarked and formed in regimental line, and marched to Union Square, arriving in front of the Union League Clubhouse at one o'clock. A vast crowd of citizens, of every shade of color and every phase of social and political life, filled the square and streets, and every door, window, veranda, tree and housetop that commanded a view of the scene was peopled with spectators. Over the entrance of the clubhouse was a large platform, ornamented with flags and filled with ladies. In the street was another platform, tastefully decorated and occupied by prominent citizens. From the stand the colors were presented by President King of Columbia College, who addressed them with warmth and eloquence. After the presentation ceremony was over the men stacked arms and partook of a collation provided for them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Presentation of Colors

"Presentation of colors to the Twentieth United States [African American] Infantry, Colonel Bartram,…

"President Lincoln riding through Richmond, Va., April 4th, 1865, and the enthusiastic cheers of the inhabitants."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

President Lincoln

"President Lincoln riding through Richmond, Va., April 4th, 1865, and the enthusiastic cheers of the…

"Reception of Confederate prisoners at the Federal prison, Elmira, N. Y. The prison at Elmira, N. Y., was finely situated on an excellent piece of ground about a mile from Elmira, and though entirely closed, the prisoners were not deprived of a view of external nature, for on one side rose pine-clad hills high up into the air, visible from all parts of the prison. The prisoners were all provided with bunks in the same kind of rough barrack as were used for sheltering our own men at the various places of rendezvous before going into the field."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

prison reception

"Reception of Confederate prisoners at the Federal prison, Elmira, N. Y. The prison at Elmira, N. Y.,…

"Federal troops destructing the railroad track."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Destruction of Railroad Track

"Federal troops destructing the railroad track."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Re-enforcements for Grant's army leaving Memphis, Tenn. Our sketch shows the <em>Alice Dean</em>, a crack Western steamer, leaving Memphis with re-enforcements, and with doctors, nurses, etc., for the wounded. She was in charge of the Cincinnati branch of the United States Sanitary Commission, and commanded by Mr. R. B. Moore, of Cincinnati. She was a very fast boat, having run up to Cincinnati from Memphis in 2 days, 23 hours and 5 minutes. The scene depicted was one of constant occurrence, as troops were pouring daily into Memphis from all parts."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Re-enforcements

"Re-enforcements for Grant's army leaving Memphis, Tenn. Our sketch shows the Alice Dean, a…

"Reconnoissance by Colonel Max Weber's Turner rifles in the vicinity of Newmarket Bridge, on the road to Yorktown, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Reconnoissance

"Reconnoissance by Colonel Max Weber's Turner rifles in the vicinity of Newmarket Bridge, on the road…

"The war on the Red River. Admiral Porter's fleet passing through Colonel Bailey's Dam, above Alexandria, May, 1864. Admiral David D. Porter's official report: 'The water had fallen so low that I had no hope or expectation of getting the vessels out this season, and, as the army had made arrangements to evacuate the country. I saw nothing before me but the destruction of the best party of the Mississippi squadron. There seems to have been an especial Providence looking out for us in providing a man equal to the emergency. Lieutenant Colonel Bailey, Acting Engineer of the Nineteenth Army Corps, proposed a plan of building a series of dams across the rocks at the falls, and raising the water high enough to let the vessels pass over. This proposition looked like madness, and the best engineers ridiculed it, but Colonel Bailey was so sanguine of success that I requested General Banks to have it done, and he entered heartily in the work. Provisions were short and forage was almost out, and the dam was promised to be finished in ten days, or the army would have to leave us. The work was successfully accomplished and the fleet passed over safely. Words are inadequate to express the admiration I feel for the abilities of Lieutenant Colonel Bailey. This is without doubt the greatest engineering feat ever performed. Under the best circumstances, a private company would not have completed this work under one year, and, to an ordinary mind, the whole thing would have appeared an utter impossibility. Leaving out his abilities as an engineer, he ws rendered a great service to the country, having saved to the Union a valuable fleet worth fully two million dollars.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Red River

"The war on the Red River. Admiral Porter's fleet passing through Colonel Bailey's Dam, above Alexandria,…

"The Federal army entering Richmond, Va., April 3rd, 1865- reception of the troops in Main Street."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Richmond

"The Federal army entering Richmond, Va., April 3rd, 1865- reception of the troops in Main Street."—…

"General Rosecrans, commanding the Department of Western Virginia, surrounded by his staff, at their headquarters, Clarksburg, VA. We present to our readers a most interesting and valuable sketch of General Rosecrans and his staff- a sketch rendered all the more interesting by the brilliant triumph he gained over the Mercury of the Confederates, Floyd. We enumerate the names of the gallant men who so efficiently carried out the plans of their chief: Joseph Derr, Jr., private secretary; Captain C. Kingsbury, Jr., aid-de-camp; Captain N. P. Richmond, adjutant, and Captain Charles Leib, quartermaster." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Rosecrans

"General Rosecrans, commanding the Department of Western Virginia, surrounded by his staff, at their…

"The war in Georgia- the Sixteenth Army Corps fording the Chattahoochee at Roswell's Ferry, July 10th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Roswell's Ferry

"The war in Georgia- the Sixteenth Army Corps fording the Chattahoochee at Roswell's Ferry, July 10th,…

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 &ndash; May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War. His death at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House is often considered a well known tale of irony.

Scene of Sedgwick's Death

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and…

"Death of General Sedgwick at Spottsylvania, May 9, 1864."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Death of Sedgwick

"Death of General Sedgwick at Spottsylvania, May 9, 1864."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

"Sherman's Seventeenth Corps crossing the south Edisto River, S. C., on Pontoons, at Bennaker's Bridge, February 9th, 1865."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Seventeenth Corps

"Sherman's Seventeenth Corps crossing the south Edisto River, S. C., on Pontoons, at Bennaker's Bridge,…

"Colonel Pilson's Battery shelling the rear guard of the Confederate General Jackson's Army, at the Crossing of the Shenandoah River, Tuesday, June 3rd, 1862. As soon as colonel Pilson could bring up his guns they were unlimbered on either side of the road and opened on the Confederate batteries. Beyond the river stretched a broad plain, the further end of which sloped gradually up into an irregular eminence, along which the enemy had placed its artillery on its further side, and in the neighboring woods its troops were quietly encamped, out of range, and with the Shenandoah River in their rear were safe for the night, as they supposed. It was soon found that the distance was too great for the guns. Colonel Albert, chief of staff, was in advance, and reconnoitring the position, with a soldier's eye saw that the river bent suddenly half a mile beyond the bridge, and sent Schirmer's battery to a hill on this side, which flanked the confederate camp, and at once forced them to withdraw to a more secure position." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Crossing of Shenandoah River

"Colonel Pilson's Battery shelling the rear guard of the Confederate General Jackson's Army, at the…

"Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley- the Federal forces falling back through Charlestown, August 21st, 1864."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Sheridan's Campaign

"Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley- the Federal forces falling back through Charlestown,…

Union forces crossing a river.

Sherman's March to the Sea

Union forces crossing a river.

The movement of General Sherman's troops towards the Atlantic Ocean.

Sherman's March to the Sea

The movement of General Sherman's troops towards the Atlantic Ocean.

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Here his troops are burning a railroad station.

Sherman's Troops Burning a Railroad Station

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Here his…

"The Sixteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteers, under Colonel Irwine, crossing the tray run viaduct, near Cheat River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On its way to Rowlesburg, Va., the Sixteenth Regiment of Ohio Volunteers crossed the Tray Run Viaduct, one of the most remarkable engineering works on the whole line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It spans a deep gorge in the mountains six hundred feet in width, and at a height of one hundred and sixty feet above the bed of the ravine. The roadway is supported on iron columns, secured and braced in a peculiar manner, and placed on a solid mass of masonry, which fills up the bottom of the run. The scenery at this point is equal to anything in the world, combining the choicest materials of mountain, forest and river."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Sixteenth Regiment

"The Sixteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteers, under Colonel Irwine, crossing the tray run viaduct, near…

Sixth Massachusetts Regiment attacked by a mob.

Sixth Massachusetts Regiment

Sixth Massachusetts Regiment attacked by a mob.

Governor Smith leaving Richmond during the American Civil War campaign against Richmond.

Governor Smith Leaving Richmond

Governor Smith leaving Richmond during the American Civil War campaign against Richmond.

"Voluntary dispersion of Kirby Smith's Confederate army at Shreveport, La., May 23rd, 1865. There was a great difference between the surrenders of General Lee and Kirby Smith. The former surrendered his army to General Grant; while the army under Kirby Smith dispersed itself, leaving the Confederate leader no army. Our sketch represents the manner in which those roughest of the Confederates broke up their military organization, and scattered to their homes and haunts. The following is Kirby Smith's orders, dated Houston, May 30th. 'Soldiers: The day after I refused the demand of the Federal Government to surrender this department I left Shreveport for Houston; I ordered the Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana troops to follow. My purpose was to concentrate the entire strength of the department, await negotiations, and, if possible, secure terms alike honorable to soldier and citizen. I reached here to find the Texas troops disbanded and hastening to their homes. They had forsaken their colors and commanders; had abandoned the cause for which we were struggling, and appropriated the public property to their personal use. Soldiers, I am left a commander without an army; a general without troops. You have made your choice. The enemy will now possess your country, and dictate his own laws. You have voluntarily destroyed your organization and thrown away all means of resistance.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kirby Smith

"Voluntary dispersion of Kirby Smith's Confederate army at Shreveport, La., May 23rd, 1865. There was…

"General J. E. B. Stuart's raid upon Pope's headquarters, August 22, 1862, when Pope's despatch book fell into the hands of the Confederates."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Stuart's Raid

"General J. E. B. Stuart's raid upon Pope's headquarters, August 22, 1862, when Pope's despatch book…

Genereal Johnson surrendering to Union General Sherman.

Surrender of General Johnson to General Sherman

Genereal Johnson surrendering to Union General Sherman.

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate lines, after his unsuccessful mission. On the 8th of July, 1861, the pickets of the Eight New York Regiment, Colonel Lyons, observed a small party of Confederate soldiers approaching with a flag of truce. This proved to be from Manassas junction, and protected Major Taylor, of New Orleans, who bore letters from Jefferson Davis and General Beauregard to President Lincoln and General Scott. Colonel Lyons telegraphed to Washington, and in reply received orders to send the dispatches on. A council was held, when the dispatches from the eminent Confederates were read. It is sufficient to say that no answer was given, and Major Taylor was conducted to the Confederate lines in the manner portrayed in our sketch." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Taylor

"Escorting Major Taylor, of New Orleans, the bearer of a flag of truce, blindfolded, to the Confederate…