The 1861-1865 Civil War Land Battles ClipArt gallery offers 262 illustrations of land battles that were fought between the Union and the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

The Battle of Allatoona, also known as Allatoona Pass, was fought October 5, 1864, as part of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War.

Allatoona Pass

The Battle of Allatoona, also known as Allatoona Pass, was fought October 5, 1864, as part of the Franklin-Nashville…

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Antietam

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th,…

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg,…

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Antietam- the opening of the fight- Hooker's division fording the Great Antietam Creek to attack the Confederate army under General lee, ten o'clock A. M., September 17th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam- the opening of the fight- Hooker's division fording the Great Antietam Creek to…

"Battle of Antietam. The centre and right wing of General McClellan's Army, commanded by Generals Hooker, Sumner and Franklin, engaged with the Confederate Army, led by Generals Longstreet, Jackson and Lee, September 17th, 1862. Our sketch was taken about ten o'clock in the morning of the 17th of September, and represents the centre and right wing of the Federal army engaged with the Confederate centre and left, commanded by Generals Longstreet and Jackson. Hooker's division was then just on the point of crossing the creek, which they did in splendid style. Thus at the close of the engagement the federal troops occupied every position held in the morning by the Confederates, who retreated behind Sharpsburg, from which they escaped over the Potomac next night. Our illustration gives an excellent idea of the nature of the struggle, and the ground over which it was fought, which admitted of much fairer fighting than the jungles of Virginia. Since Waterloo there has been no struggle so long and so fiercely contested, and with an army spread over so wide an extent- the extreme end of the right wing, under Hooker, being three miles distant from the extreme left of Burnside, whose Hawkins's Zouave charge concluded this hard-fought day. At seven o'clock the last gun was fired, and the armies, victorious and vanquished, rested for the night."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam. The centre and right wing of General McClellan's Army, commanded by Generals Hooker,…

"The battle of Antietam. The One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment of Volunteers burying the Confederate dead, Friday, September 19th, 1862. This spot was the scene of one of the most desperate conflicts of the war. This scene of the burial of the dead by the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers is a most interesting part of Antietam battlefield, it being the post where one of the most murderous conflicts took place. The ditch shown in the sketch at nearly right angles was used by the Confederates as a rifle-pit, and from its shelter many a destructive volley was poured upon the Federals. After much manoeuvring, the Irish Brigade managed to get on a slight elevation, which commanded a portion of the ditch, while the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment took up another. The Confederates, finding themselves between two fires, retreated, but not till they had lost many men. The next day, when the One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment was detailed to burty the dead, it found one hundred and thirty-eight dead Confederates in this ditch, a proof of the desperate tenacity with chich the position had been defended."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"The battle of Antietam. The One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment of Volunteers burying the…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming the Confederate position, after a desperate conflict of four hours, Wednesday, September 17th, 1862. On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge, after an obstinate contest of four hours' duration and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed, and finding the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, advanced in line of battle on their new position, about half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on the advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hillin front of the enemy's batteries they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. The Federals, though terribly decimated, gave them a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming…

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek, as part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on…

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg. The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg.…

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near…

"The capture of Arkansas Post, Ark. General Stephen G. Burbridge, accompanied by his staff, planting the Stars and Stripes on Fort Hindman, January 11th, 1863. No sooner was the fort surrendered than General Burbridge and his staff sprang across the ditch, mounted the parapet, and planted the flag of the republic upon its bloody battlements, thus making a fitting <em>finale</em> to one of the most glorious achievements of the war. The number of prisoners surrendered was 5,000, the Federal forces in action being 27,000. An immense quantity of quartemaster's, commissary and ordinance stores were also obtained, among which were 20 guns, 8,000 stands of small arms, and 100 army wagons, with herds of horses and mules."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Arkansas Post

"The capture of Arkansas Post, Ark. General Stephen G. Burbridge, accompanied by his staff, planting…

Showing the Battle for Atlanta, which Sherman won for the Union during the Civil War.

Battle of Atlanta

Showing the Battle for Atlanta, which Sherman won for the Union during the Civil War.

"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants after driving in the Federal pickets moved up steadily, and, with a steady step, opened out when within four hundred yards of the fortification. Meeting no force, the assailants took courage, and when within three hundred yards raised a tremendous yell and started on the double quick; but at that instant the signal was given, and every battery, double-shotted with canister, was let loose, and the apparently deserted fortification was lined with heads, and at every foot a shining musket was aimed at the assailants. The destroying volley swept in a single instant hundreds of men into eternity, and laid thousands upon the earth maimed, many of them for life, on the plains before Atlanta. They awaited no second fire; another, and the army would have been destroyed. They therefore sought shelter beyond the range of the Federal guns."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Atlanta

"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants…

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant. On the 12th General Grant overtook General Gregg at Raymond, and after a stubborn fight defeated him, Gregg retreating with a loss of 7,000 men. Having been joined by reinforcements under General Walker, Gregg made a stand the next day at Mississippi Springs, but Grant again defeated him. On the 14th, in a still warmer engagement, he utterly defeated Gregg, who lost 400 men and 17 cannon, and fled through Jackson, firing the Capitol and many depots, storehouses and dwellings. On the 16th he met General Pemberton, with the whole garrison of Vicksburg, at Baker's Creek, and defeated him, driving him back toward Vicksburg, with a loss of 29 pieces of artillery and 4,000 men, and cutting him off from all hopes of relief. Pressing rapidly on, Grant, on the 17th, overtook Pemberton at Big Black River Bridge, and again defeated him, with a loss of 2,600 men and 17 guns. Pemberton then retired into the city, which Grant invested."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Baker's Creek

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant.…

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Battle of Baton Rouge

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil…

An illustration of a battle in 1861.

Battle

An illustration of a battle in 1861.

The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on May 31 and June 1, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the Civil War.

Battle of Fair Oaks

The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on…

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops. On July 8th, 1861, from a high hill in the neighborhood of Bealington, two large bodies of troops were seen marching out of the Confederate camp. They advanced under cover of the wood, when the Federal skirmishers rushed at them. The confederate cavalry then appeared, and the skirmishers retreated, when the Federal regiments threw a couple of shells into the midst of the cavalry, who at once retired. The Ohio troops then sent another volley and several shells into the wood, which did so much execution among the Confederates that the officers could not rally them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bealington

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops.…

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S. Grant; Confederate forces, by Leonidas Polk. Explanation: 1. Brigadier General Grant and staff directing the movements of the troops. 2. Brigadier General McClernand leading the charge at the head of the Thirty-first Illinois. 3. Thirty-first Illinois, Colonel Logan. 4. Body of Lieutenant Colonel Wendtz, Seventh Ohio. 5. Body of Captain Pulaski, aid-de-camp to McClernand, killed while leading the charge. 6. Caisson ordered to the field from the rear. 7. Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Buford, taking the camp colors of the Confederates. 8. Thirtieth illinois, colonel Fouke. 8A. Twenty-second Illinois, Colonel Dougherty. 9. Light artillery, Captain Taylor. 10. Seventh Ohio, Colonel 11. Captain Schwartz, acting chief of artillery, taking the Confederate battery. 12. Watson's Louisiana field battery. 13. Confederate artillery horses. 14. Battery of heavy ordinance at Columbus. 15. Encampment near Columbus. 16. Confederate ferryboat. 17. Columbus"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Belmont

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S.…

"The Battle of Bentonville, N. C.- Major General Mower, commanding First Division, Seventeenth Corps, turning the Confederate left, half a mile from Bentonville, March 20th, 1865. This pretty and thriving little town, in Johnston County, N. C., was the scene of a desperate struggle between a portion of General Sherman's army and the rear of the Confederate army on the 20th of March, 1865. Our artist has given a spirited sketch of a brilliant dash upon the Confederate forces by a division of the Seventeenth Corps, commanded by General Mower, and spoke with great admiration of the dogged valor of a Confederate captain who refused to surrender his gun. A sharp encounter ensued between him and one of the Federal soldiers, in which the unfortunate Confederate got his brains dashed out with the butt-end of a musket. The defeat of the Confederates was very much attributed to the brilliant charge made upon their lines by which their right was flanked. When the Federal troops entered, it was found that the retreating Confederates had fired a large quantity of rosin and turpentine. The flames were, however, subdued, before all was destroyed."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Bentonville

"The Battle of Bentonville, N. C.- Major General Mower, commanding First Division, Seventeenth Corps,…

The Battle of Big Black River Bridge, or Big Black, fought May 17, 1863, was part of the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War.

Battle at Big Black River

The Battle of Big Black River Bridge, or Big Black, fought May 17, 1863, was part of the Vicksburg Campaign…

The Battle of Big Black River Bridge, or Big Black, fought May 17, 1863, was part of the Vicksburg Campaign of the American Civil War.

View on the Big Black River

The Battle of Big Black River Bridge, or Big Black, fought May 17, 1863, was part of the Vicksburg Campaign…

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates. On Sunday, September 14th, 1862, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass, on the line of the Federal road leading from Frederick City to Hagerstown and the fords of the Upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one, and strongly guarded, but was carried after a severe action by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Blue Ridge Pass

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates.…

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On Sunday, the 14th day of September, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass on the line of the national road leading from Frederick toward Hagerstown and the fords of the upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one and strongly guarded, but was carried, after a severe action, by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates. The Federal loss was four hundred and forty-three killed, one thousand eight hundred and six wounded, and seventy-six missing; that of the Confederates, five hundred killed, two thousand three hundred and forty-three wounded, and one thousand five hundred prisoners."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Blue Ridge Pass

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On…

The Battle of Booneville was a skirmish of the American Civil War, occurring on June 17, 1861, in Cooper County, Missouri. Union victory established Federal control of the Missouri River and helped thwart efforts to ally Missouri with the Confederacy.

General Lyon's March to Booneville

The Battle of Booneville was a skirmish of the American Civil War, occurring on June 17, 1861, in Cooper…

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle of the American Civil War, fought on July 21, 1861, near Manassas, Virginia.

Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land battle of the Civil War fought on July 21, 1861 near Manassas, Virginia. Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell advanced his Union Army troops across Bull Run against the Confederate Army under Brig. Gens. Joseph E. Johnston and P.G.T. Buearegard. The Union was forced to retreat back to Washington, D.C.

First Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land…

"Second battle of Bull Run, fought Saturday, August 30th, 1862, between the Federal forces commanded by Major General Pope, and the Confederate forces by Generals Lee, Jackson and Longstreet. The battle began about twelve o'clock noon, and was waged with unwavering success for the Federal forces until about four o'clock in the afternoon. The fighting on both sides was desperate and destructive, either party frequently firing shrapnel and grape from the artillery. At about four o'clock the whole of General Pope's troops, save those under General Banks, were engaged at close quarters with the Confederate forces. The conflict was a desperate one. The firing on both sides was terrific, and the whole line of General Pope's command, from generals commanding army corps down to enlisted men, behaved with wonderful coolness, courage and determination, and fought with the most heroic valor from the beginning to the end. The tide of battle turned adversely for the Federals about half-past five o'clock, overwhelming numbers of re-enforcements being precipitated against the left wing under General McDowell, who was compelled to fall back."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second Battle of Bull Run

"Second battle of Bull Run, fought Saturday, August 30th, 1862, between the Federal forces commanded…

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, between the troops of General McClellan's command, under General Morris, and the Confederates under General Garnett, July 13th, 1861. After a long march through drenching rain, the Federal troops under General Morris reached Carrick's Ford, where they found the Confederates holding the cliff on the opposite bank of the river. Both sides began a heavy firing. Then the Seventh Indiana Regiment plunged into the river and scaled the cliff on the right of the enemy, while the others kept up the fight in front. As soon as the flanking party reached the top of the cliff the Confederates retreated, and were pursued for about two miles."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Carrick's Ford

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, between the troops of General McClellan's command, under General Morris,…

The Battle of Cedar Creek, or The Battle of Belle Grove, October 19, 1864, was one of the final, and most decisive, battles in the Valley Campaigns of 1864 during the American Civil War.

View at Cedar Creek Battle-ground

The Battle of Cedar Creek, or The Battle of Belle Grove, October 19, 1864, was one of the final, and…

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862. As soon as the order to advance was given the brigade moved forward, until it came to the open field, in perfect silence. As soon as it was clear from the woods, with a cheer that could have been heard all over the battle ground, it took the double-quick, and though at every step its ranks grew thinner from the murderous fire through which it passed, yet there was no faltering, no hesitancy; onward, across the field, up the slope and into and through the woods it went, until it met the second line of the enemy's overpowering forces. Forced at last to yield to overwhelming odds, it retired over the ground gained at such a frightful cost until it reached the cover from which it started. Here what remained held their position until the third brigade could come to its support. When exhausted, cut to pieces, its officers all gone, with no one to direct it, those who survived gathered as fast as thy could, and in the morning all that was left of that brigade was less than seven hundred men." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar…

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862- wounded men lying on the ground, McDowell's division marching on the field. The scene at night was very striking. It was past ten o'clock, and there was a bright moonlight and a clear blue sky. The Federal troops were on a rising ground, while the enemy's batteries were shelling from the woods, the Federal batteries replying, and one by one driving them further back. The hospital was near the Federal position, and wounded men wre lying on the ground, waiting their turn to receive surgical attention. Near them were groups of stragglers, ambulances, ammunition wagons, etc." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain,…

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by General Banks and the Confederate Army led by Generals Jackson, Ewell, Winder, etc.- final repulse of the Confederates. General Pope's report of the battle is as follows: "On Saturday, August 9th, 1862, the enemy advanced rapidly to Cedar Mountain, the sides of which they occupied in heavy force. General Banks was instructed to take up his position on the ground occupied by Crawford's brigade, of his command, which had been thrown out the day previous to observe the enemy's movements. He was directed not to advance beyond that point, and if attacked by the enemy to defend his position and send back timely notice. The artillery of the enemy was opened early in the afternoon, but he made no advance until nearly five o'clock, at which time a few skirmishers were thrown forward on each side under cover of the heavy wood in which his force was concealed. The enemy pushed forward a strong force in the rear of his skirmishers, and General Banks advanced to the attack. The engagement did not fairly open until after six o'clock, and for an hour and a half was furious and unceasing. I arrived personally on the field at 7 P.M., and found the action raging furiously. The infantry fire was incessant and severe. I found General Banks holding the position he took up early in the morning. His losses were heavy. Ricketts's division was immediately pushed forward and occupied the right of General Banks, the brigades of Crawford and Gordon being directed to change their position from the right and mass themselves in the centre. Before this change could be effected it was quite dark, though the artillery fire continued at short range without intermission. The artillery fire, at night, by the Second and Fifth Maine batteries in Ricketts's division of General McDowell's corps was most destructive, as was readily observable the next morning in the dead men and horses and broken gun carriages of the enemy's batteries which had been advanced against it. Our troops rested on their arms during the night in line of battle, the heavy shelling being kept up on both sides until midnight. At daylight the next morning the enemy fell back two miles from our front, and still higher up the mountain."" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by…

Burning of the engine-house at Chambersburg. The borough was the only major northern community burnt down by Confederate forces during the war.

Borough of Chambersburg

Burning of the engine-house at Chambersburg. The borough was the only major northern community burnt…

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals Hovey, Logan and Crocker, of Grant's army. On the morning of the 16th of May, General A. P. Hovey's division, occupying the right of McClernand's corps, encountered the Confederate pickets, but no engagement took place until about eleven o'clock, when the Indiana troops, led by General McGinnis, made a deliberate attack upon the rapidly increasing force which Pemberton had brought together at Champion Hills. Two batteries which had been planted along a high ridge were doing considerable damage, and it was finally determined to assault them. They were both taken by the Eleventh and Forty-sixth Indiana and the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, after a fierce hand-to-hand fight; but the arrival of fresh Confederate troops and the want of re-enforcements prevented their being held for any length of time. The Federals withdrew, and remained under cover of their artillery till joined by part of Quimby's late dvision, commanded by General Marcellus M. Crocker. Another advance was then ordered, and while Pemberton's right was thus engaged Logan's division attacked his left, and succeeded in flanking and in forcing it back in such manner as to completely isolate for awhile the whole of General Loring's brigade, which occupied the extreme Confederate right. The attack was so fierce that Stevenson's line became completely demoralized, yielded in turn, and by four o'clock the Confederates were in full retreat toward the Big Black River. Just then the other division of McClernand's corps came upon the scene, and a pursuit was ordered by Generals Carr and Osterhaus. This lasted until dark, and resulted in the capture of many prisoners and arms of all descriptions. The total loss in killed and wounded on both sides approximated to 4,000."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Champion Hills

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals…

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals Hovey, Logan and Crocker, of Grant's army. On the morning of the 16th of May, General A. P. Hovey's division, occupying the right of McClernand's corps, encountered the Confederate pickets, but no engagement took place until about eleven o'clock, when the Indiana troops, led by General McGinnis, made a deliberate attack upon the rapidly increasing force which Pemberton had brought together at Champion Hills. Two batteries which had been planted along a high ridge were doing considerable damage, and it was finally determined to assault them. They were both taken by the Eleventh and Forty-sixth Indiana and the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, after a fierce hand-to-hand fight; but the arrival of fresh Confederate troops and the want of re-enforcements prevented their being held for any length of time. The Federals withdrew, and remained under cover of their artillery till joined by part of Quimby's late dvision, commanded by General Marcellus M. Crocker. Another advance was then ordered, and while Pemberton's right was thus engaged Logan's division attacked his left, and succeeded in flanking and in forcing it back in such manner as to completely isolate for awhile the whole of General Loring's brigade, which occupied the extreme Confederate right. The attack was so fierce that Stevenson's line became completely demoralized, yielded in turn, and by four o'clock the Confederates were in full retreat toward the Big Black River. Just then the other division of McClernand's corps came upon the scene, and a pursuit was ordered by Generals Carr and Osterhaus. This lasted until dark, and resulted in the capture of many prisoners and arms of all descriptions. The total loss in killed and wounded on both sides approximated to 4,000."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Champion Hills

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals…

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals Hovey, Logan and Crocker, of Grant's army. On the morning of the 16th of May, General A. P. Hovey's division, occupying the right of McClernand's corps, encountered the Confederate pickets, but no engagement took place until about eleven o'clock, when the Indiana troops, led by General McGinnis, made a deliberate attack upon the rapidly increasing force which Pemberton had brought together at Champion Hills. Two batteries which had been planted along a high ridge were doing considerable damage, and it was finally determined to assault them. They were both taken by the Eleventh and Forty-sixth Indiana and the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, after a fierce hand-to-hand fight; but the arrival of fresh Confederate troops and the want of re-enforcements prevented their being held for any length of time. The Federals withdrew, and remained under cover of their artillery till joined by part of Quimby's late dvision, commanded by General Marcellus M. Crocker. Another advance was then ordered, and while Pemberton's right was thus engaged Logan's division attacked his left, and succeeded in flanking and in forcing it back in such manner as to completely isolate for awhile the whole of General Loring's brigade, which occupied the extreme Confederate right. The attack was so fierce that Stevenson's line became completely demoralized, yielded in turn, and by four o'clock the Confederates were in full retreat toward the Big Black River. Just then the other division of McClernand's corps came upon the scene, and a pursuit was ordered by Generals Carr and Osterhaus. This lasted until dark, and resulted in the capture of many prisoners and arms of all descriptions. The total loss in killed and wounded on both sides approximated to 4,000."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Champion Hills

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals…

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals Hovey, Logan and Crocker, of Grant's army. On the morning of the 16th of May, General A. P. Hovey's division, occupying the right of McClernand's corps, encountered the Confederate pickets, but no engagement took place until about eleven o'clock, when the Indiana troops, led by General McGinnis, made a deliberate attack upon the rapidly increasing force which Pemberton had brought together at Champion Hills. Two batteries which had been planted along a high ridge were doing considerable damage, and it was finally determined to assault them. They were both taken by the Eleventh and Forty-sixth Indiana and the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, after a fierce hand-to-hand fight; but the arrival of fresh Confederate troops and the want of re-enforcements prevented their being held for any length of time. The Federals withdrew, and remained under cover of their artillery till joined by part of Quimby's late dvision, commanded by General Marcellus M. Crocker. Another advance was then ordered, and while Pemberton's right was thus engaged Logan's division attacked his left, and succeeded in flanking and in forcing it back in such manner as to completely isolate for awhile the whole of General Loring's brigade, which occupied the extreme Confederate right. The attack was so fierce that Stevenson's line became completely demoralized, yielded in turn, and by four o'clock the Confederates were in full retreat toward the Big Black River. Just then the other division of McClernand's corps came upon the scene, and a pursuit was ordered by Generals Carr and Osterhaus. This lasted until dark, and resulted in the capture of many prisoners and arms of all descriptions. The total loss in killed and wounded on both sides approximated to 4,000."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Champion Hills

"Battle of Champion Hills, May 16th, 1863- the formidable position of General Pemberton carried by Generals…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the memorable battle of Chancellorsville began. It was at the junction of the Gordonsville Plank Road, the Old Turnpike, and the road from Ely's and United States stores. The first fighting took place here on Friday, May 1st, and on Saturday the Eleventh Corps was routed, and the enemy repulsed by consummate generalship and the most resolute bravery of the Federal troops. Here, too, on Sunday the enemy made an attack with such overhwhelming force as to force the Federal army back to the second line. Few spots possess greater interest than this scene of fearful battle."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5 P.M., as seen from Falmouth Heights. After General Sedgwick had carried the fortifications on Sunday, May 3rd, he pushed along the Gordonsville Plank Road in pursuit till night stopped his advance. Before morning the enemy threw a heavy force in his rear, cutting him off from his small force at Fredericksburg on the rear, and began to mass troops on his front and left flank. About half-past five o'clock in the afternoon they began the attack, and columns poured from behind the breastworks and marched down the hill to the plain above the town and opposite Falmouth, receiving, as they came in range, a brisk fire from the Federal artillery beyond the river. Unchecked by this, however, they rushed on Sedgwick's line, which repeatedly repulsed them, falling back, however, gradually to Banks's Ford, which they crossed in the morning on pontoons. In the sketch the breastworks captured on Sunday are seen, with the Confederates passing between them and the river in columns to attack Sedgwick's troops, which are the continuous line in the distance."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler, detaching itself from General Slocum's division and rushing to the support of the General Kearny's division, which had been driven back, thus turning the fortunes of the day, June 30th, 1862, six o'clock p.m." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Charles City

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler,…

"Seacoast operations against Charleston- brilliant dash and capture of Confederate rifle pits and prisoners by the Federal troops on James Island, S. C., February 9th, 1865."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Charleston

"Seacoast operations against Charleston- brilliant dash and capture of Confederate rifle pits and prisoners…

"Siege of Charleston- the doomed city fired by Gillmore's explosive shells from Fort Putnam, January 3rd, 1864."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Charleston

"Siege of Charleston- the doomed city fired by Gillmore's explosive shells from Fort Putnam, January…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19th-20th, 1863, between Generals Rosecrans and Bragg. Our sketch of this most important battle shows General Thomas and his staff anxiously looking for re-enforcements as his gallant troops from their temporary breastwork of loggs and knapsacks, are repulsing the retreated assaults of the overpowering Confederate forces and saving the whole Army of the Cumberland from destruction. After skirmishing on Thursday and Friday, September 17th and 18th, General Rosecrans on Saturday formed his line, with General Thomas on the left, having under him Brannan, Baird and Reynolds; Negley and Wood held the extreme right at Owen's Ford and Gordon's Mill. Crittenden's corps, consisting of Palmer's and Van Cleve's divisions, formed the centre, with part of McCook's on each side. The line generally followed the Chickamauga, though on the left it took the course of the Lafayette Road. Between ten and eleven A. M. Cranston's brigade, of Brannan's division, met the first attack, and in a few moments the whole division was forced back, Thomas then ordered his entire line to advance, and Longstreet was driven back with slaughter, losing the ground and cannon he had gained, and his corps was fast melting under the blows of Thomas, when Polk and Hill threw their corps with impetuosity on Crittenden, and after a fierce struggle routed him, and drove to the right, in similar disorder, Davis's division, of McCook's corps, leaving a wide gap in the line and exposing Thomas to a heavy flank attack. Back then his victorious troops returned to meet the new enemy, and Thomas, with Negley and Wood, from the right, rallying some of the routed centre, drove the enemy back. Before the deadly fire of this new line the Confederates everywhere retired, and before sunset Rosecrans's army held its old line. During the night Rosecrans fell back to a new line, resting Negley with his right on Missionary Ridge, Van Cleve, Wood and Sheridan on the left, and Thomas more in the centre. The fight commenced on the extreme left, and the Confederates, about ten in the morning, attacked Negley with all their strength, and Longstreet again rolled his verterans on Thomas, and again a bitterly contested fight took place. At last General Reynolds began to give way, and Wood was sent to his relief. As Davis moved to fill Wood's place the Confederates took them in flank, and routing them, severed Rosecrans's line, leaving him, with Sheridan, Davis and Wilder, cut off entirely from the mass of his army. Thomas gathered up the other portion of the army in a strong line on Missionary Ridge, and prepared to resist the last Confederate attack, made with all the inspiration of victory; but his men stood firm, and a cloud of dust to the left soon showed a line advancing on the Lafayette Road. Every eye was strained; a moment would tell whether the day's disaster must close in irreparable ruin or there was yet hope of repulsing the foe. It was General Granger with two fresh brigades, which, fresh for battle, now rushed on the enemy and drove them from a hill which they had gained; and thus aided, Thomas repulsed the enemy, and fell back, unmolested, to Rossville."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chickamauga

"Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19th-20th, 1863, between Generals Rosecrans and Bragg. Our sketch…

The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18-20, 1863, marked the end of a Union offensive in south-central Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign. The battle was the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater of the American Civil War.

Battle of Chickamauga

The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18-20, 1863, marked the end of a Union offensive in south-central…

"Battle of Chickamauga- repulse of the Confederates at Crawfish Creek. We present a most interesting sketch of the battle of Chickamauga, the repulse and check of the Confederate cavalry by the Twenty-fourth Illinois and Company K of the Nineteenth Illinois. They were separated from the Confederates by a stone fence and a small creek. Their daring and heroic resistance was never surpassed, some of them climbing the stone fence to meet the Confederates as they rushed madly down upon the gallant little band. They had the whole Confederate cavalry and four divisions of infantry and artillery to fight, but notwithstanding this vast odds they held their position until re-enforcements reached them. The Twenty-fourth Illinois was commanded by Colonel G. Michalotzy, who was slightly wounded in the right hand. They went into the battle with 330 men, and came out with but 163, less than half their number."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chickamauga

"Battle of Chickamauga- repulse of the Confederates at Crawfish Creek. We present a most interesting…

Depiction of a Civil War battle.

Civil War Battle

Depiction of a Civil War battle.