The Miscellaneous Sports and Recreation ClipArt gallery offers 28 illustrations of general objects used in sports and recreation as well ass awards and trophies for sporting events.

The America's Cup is the most prestigious race in the sport of sailing and the oldest active trophy in international sport.

America's Cup

The America's Cup is the most prestigious race in the sport of sailing and the oldest active trophy…

Any round body, or one nearly so.

Ball

Any round body, or one nearly so.

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one picture of which we are instructed that the loser was obliged to suffer another to ride on her back." — Goodrich, 1844

Egyptian ball game

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one…

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one picture of which we are instructed that the loser was obliged to suffer another to ride on her back." — Goodrich, 1844

Egyptian ball game

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one…

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one picture of which we are instructed that the loser was obliged to suffer another to ride on her back. Some of these identical balls have been found in the tombs at Thebes." — Goodrich, 1844

Egyptian ball

"Some of the Egyptian female sports were rather of a hoydenish character, as the game of ball, in one…

A boy playing with his toy ship.

Boy and Ship

A boy playing with his toy ship.

An illustration of three children playing a game where they take turns blowing bubbles down a table towards a small goal.

Bubble Blowing

An illustration of three children playing a game where they take turns blowing bubbles down a table…

A sport that involves, most of the time, professional performers who execute various formal moves with the goal of appearing graceful and confident, while masterful over the bull itself.

Bull Fighter

A sport that involves, most of the time, professional performers who execute various formal moves with…

"Two players are made to sit on the ground draw their legs up, and clasp their hands together over their shins. A stout stick is then passed through under their knees, and over their arms at the bend of the elbows, as in the cut, and there they sit trussed like a couple of fowls. Thus prepared, the two cobatants are placed face to face, their toes touching, and are left to fight it out. This they do by striving to knock each other down, each to overbalance the other without loosing his own equilibrium. Two falls out of three decide the game; if both fall it is no 'round,' and does not count. As the player may not unclasp his hands even when down, he is quite helpless, and must be assisted by his friends." — Thomas Sheppard Meek

Cock-Fighting

"Two players are made to sit on the ground draw their legs up, and clasp their hands together over their…

A diagram of the arrangement and measurements of a croquet ground.

Croquet Ground

A diagram of the arrangement and measurements of a croquet ground.

A game with a cup and ball

Cup and Ball

A game with a cup and ball

A dancer

Dancer

A dancer

A man and woman dancing.

Dancing

A man and woman dancing.

A girl and her father dancing.

Dancing

A girl and her father dancing.

The Foxhound of Great Britain is a dog of notable pedigree. The modern Foxhound is descended from the old southern hound. Foxhounds are traditionally hunting dogs, trained in packs. They vary in size from 22 to 25 inches in height. Although they may not appear to be built for speed, Foxhounds have been known to cover a mile in under two minutes.

Foxhound

The Foxhound of Great Britain is a dog of notable pedigree. The modern Foxhound is descended from the…

"This may be done in two ways: first and most difficult, by one boy standing on another's shoulders, and then putting over both a long loose garment, long enough to reach to the knees of the lower one. This method, however, may be made much more easy by the upper player putting his feet in a kind of stirrup fastened to straps passing over the under one's shoulder's, and hanging just down to the hips. Height, of course, is sacrificed, but greater safety is secured; the giant, too, can exhibit thus for a longer time, as the attitude is not so fatiguing. The other and simpler method is to place a huge mask, which should represent a head and neck, on the top of a pole about five feet long, with a cross-piece to represent arms, and then tying a long cloak- it should be made for the purpose: any common material will do- round the neck of the mask and get bodily inside. Now, by raising or depressing the pole, the giant may be made to attain an extra ordinary stature or to shrink down again to ordinary dimensions as well. The lower end of the cloak, about two feet from the bottom, must be fastened to the performer's waist, so that when the head is depressed the cloak may fall in folds, and not sweep the ground as it otherwise would. There is a very entertaining illusion of this sort exhibited under the name of 'The Nondescripts.' Two figures with enormous heads, alternately giants and dwarfs, run about the circus and indulge in the most surprising vagaries, being able apparently to contort themselves in every imaginable direction. Their final coup is to put their heads deliberately through their legs, and make their exit with their eyes thus looking over their own shoulders."— Thomas Sheppard Meek

The Giant

"This may be done in two ways: first and most difficult, by one boy standing on another's shoulders,…

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed to him.
Gladiators were swordsmen whose profession was to fight for the public amusement. Gladiators are said to have been borrowed by Rome from the Etruscans. They were first exhibited in Rome in 246 BC, primarily at funerals, but afterwards at festivals, particularly those celebrated by the aediles and other magistrates. More than ten thousand were shown at Trajan's triumph over the Dacians. They were either free-born citizens, usually of a low class, who fought for hire, or captives, slaves, or malefactors, and were kept in schools, where they were carefully trained. Chief varieties were Andabatae, who wore helmets with no openings for the eyes, so that their blindfold movements provoked the spectators' mirth; Mirmillones, who used Gallic weapons, sword and shield; Retiarii, who carried a net and a three-pronged lance -- the net to entangle their opponents; and Thraces, who, like the Thracians, used a short sword and a round buckler. 
When a gladiator was severely wounded and defeated, the people cried out 'Habet' (He has it), and he lowered his arms; then, if the spectators wished his life to be spared, they turned their thumbs down; but it they desired his death, they turned them up. These combats were often attended by great cruelty and callousness on the part of the spectators; sometimes they were fights à outrance, none being spared alive. Discharged gladiators were presented with a rudis, or wooden sword, and hence were called rudiarii. Gladiatorial combats were disliked by the Greeks, and practically never took place in Greek cities.

Gladiators

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed…

A billiard cue, a baseball bat, a tennis racket, all the instruments used in golf, are hammers.

A Hammer for Play

A billiard cue, a baseball bat, a tennis racket, all the instruments used in golf, are hammers.

Man tosses bits of paper as he runs.

Hare and Hounds

Man tosses bits of paper as he runs.

A glove used in the sport hawking, employed to protect ones hand and wrist from the talons and beak of the hawk rest on it.

Hawking Glove

A glove used in the sport hawking, employed to protect ones hand and wrist from the talons and beak…

A man jumping over a hurdle.

Hurdling

A man jumping over a hurdle.

Jockey running toward right.

Jockey

Jockey running toward right.

Boys playing post-ball.

Post-Ball

Boys playing post-ball.

"This game is played something like lawn billiards, except that there are six revolving rings instead of one, and that the ball is thrown and not pushed with a cue. The rings and balls are painted of corresponding colors. The object of the game is to throw the six balls through the rings, each successful throw counting as three; but when a ball passes through a ring of its own color the player scores six. The game is best played by having a pool, as mentioned in the royal star."— Thomas Sheppard Meek

Revolving Ring

"This game is played something like lawn billiards, except that there are six revolving rings instead…

Position to throw an attacker.

Self-defense

Position to throw an attacker.

The Fox-terrier is not an old breed, only dating back about a century; but the fox-terrier's cleverness, sharpness, sprightliness, impudence, and pluck endear him wherever he goes. Several special clubs devote their attention to the fostering of this breed in Great Britain and in the United States.

Smooth-coated Fox-terrier

The Fox-terrier is not an old breed, only dating back about a century; but the fox-terrier's cleverness,…

The America's Cup, a yachting trophy.

Trophy

The America's Cup, a yachting trophy.

"Get a circular piece of tin, three inches or more in diameter, and cut it round the edges in the form of a star. Bore two holes through it about an inch and a half apart; pass the two ends of a string through the holes; tie them, and the toy is complete. When the tin star cannot be procured, a big button will serve the purpose admirably. Hold an end of the double string in each hand, as seen in the illustration, and spin the tin star, or 'whizzer' as we shall call it, until the string is twisted as far as it will bear. Now separate the hands, and the whizzer will revolve rapidly, and, when the hands are stretched wide, will come to rest as shown in the illustration. But if, instead of allowing the hands to reach their fullest extent and to remain there, they are brought gradually together again, the cutter will revolve in the opposite direction, and wind itself up again. Thus it may be made to wind and unwind itself as long as the player likes."— Thomas Sheppard Meek

Whizzer

"Get a circular piece of tin, three inches or more in diameter, and cut it round the edges in the form…