The Ancient Greece ClipArt gallery offers 335 illustration of Greek history, events, and scenes of everyday life. For related images, please see Greek Mythology, Greek Architecture, Greek Ornament, Greek Coins, and the Ancient Greek Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

"Marsupium, a purse. The purse used by the ancients was commonly a small leathern bag, and was often closed by being drawn together at the mouth. Mercury is commonly represented holding one in his hand, of which the annexed woodcut from an intaglia in the Stosch collection in Berlin presents an example." — Smith, 1873

Marsupium

"Marsupium, a purse. The purse used by the ancients was commonly a small leathern bag, and was often…

"While Greek tragedt grew farther and farther away from the humor and burlesque so characteristic of the old satyr dances and songs, comedy arose to incorporate within itself much of this early spirit. The comedies supplied entertainments, pure and simple, yet at the same time did much to mold public opinion." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Comedy masks

"While Greek tragedt grew farther and farther away from the humor and burlesque so characteristic of…

"Tragedy masks. The origin of Greek drama is to be found in the yearly celebrations in honor of Dionysus, god of wine. Riotous festivals were held, during which the god of wine was extolled with carousals and boisterous songs, these having been introduced to Greece from Thrace, where they were even wilder in their nature." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Tragedy masks

"Tragedy masks. The origin of Greek drama is to be found in the yearly celebrations in honor of Dionysus,…

The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey) for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire, and Artemisia II of Caria, his wife and sister. The structure was designed by the Greek architects Satyrus and Pythius. It stood approximately 45 metres (135 ft) in height, and each of the four sides was adorned with sculptural reliefs created by each one of four Greek sculptors — Leochares, Bryaxis, Scopas of Paros and Timotheus. The finished structure was considered to be such an aesthetic triumph that Antipater of Sidon identified it as one of his Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum,…

A medal that appears to have been made at the time when Claudius Optatus was Duumvir.

Medal

A medal that appears to have been made at the time when Claudius Optatus was Duumvir.

A medal of Antioch engraved with an image of Nemesis, the goddess of divine punishment.

Medal of Antioch

A medal of Antioch engraved with an image of Nemesis, the goddess of divine punishment.

A medal of Attalia. One side pictures Neptune with his trident, suggesting that Attalia was a seaport. The other side depicts an unknown figure, possibly Pluto.

medal of Attalia

A medal of Attalia. One side pictures Neptune with his trident, suggesting that Attalia was a seaport.…

"The simplest kind of table was a round one with three legs. It is shown in the drinking scene painted on the wall of a wine shop at Pompeii, and is represented in the annexed woodcut. Tables, however, must usually have had four legs. For the houses of the opulent, tables were made of the most valuable and beautiful kinds of wood, especially of maple, or of the citrus of Africa, which was a species of cypress or juniper. As the table was not large, it was usual to place the disches and the various kinds of meat upon it, and then to bring it thus furnished to the place where the guests were reclining. On many occasions, indeed, each guest either had a small table to himself, or the company was divided into parties of two or three, with a seperate table for each party, as is distinctly represented in the cut under Symposium." — Smith, 1873

Mensa

"The simplest kind of table was a round one with three legs. It is shown in the drinking scene painted…

"Early Metal Implements" — Morey, 1903

Metal Tools

"Early Metal Implements" — Morey, 1903

"An eastern head-dress, sometimes spoken of as a characteristic of the Phrygians. It was also the name of the head-band or head-dress worn by Greek women, which was made of close materials. It must be distinguished from the reticulum, made of net." — Smith, 1873

Mitra

"An eastern head-dress, sometimes spoken of as a characteristic of the Phrygians. It was also the name…

"The "Lion Gate" at Mycenae" — Morey, 1903

Mycenae

"The "Lion Gate" at Mycenae" — Morey, 1903

"Gate of Mycenae, the City of Agamemnon."—Colby, 1899

Gate of Mycenae

"Gate of Mycenae, the City of Agamemnon."—Colby, 1899

"The second class, those cut in the rock, have either sculptured facades, or a kind of frame standing out from the rock." —D'Anvers, 1895

Tomb at Myra

"The second class, those cut in the rock, have either sculptured facades, or a kind of frame standing…

"A Nebris is a fawn's skin, worn originally by hunters and others, as an appropriate part of their dress, and afterwards attributed to Bacchus, and consequently assumed by his votaries in the processions and ceremonies which they observed in honour of him. The annexed woodcut taken from Sir William Hamilton's vases, shows a riestess of Bacchus in the attitude of offering a nebris to him or to one of his ministers." — Smith, 1873

Nebris

"A Nebris is a fawn's skin, worn originally by hunters and others, as an appropriate part of their dress,…

"The following, also, are specimens of other ancient necklances. The first, small golden lizards alternate with drops. The second one was found at St. Agatha, near Naples, in the sepulchre of a Greek lady. It has 71 pendants. The third, fourth, and fifth, were found in Etrurian tombs." — Anthon, 1891

Ancient necklaces

"The following, also, are specimens of other ancient necklances. The first, small golden lizards alternate…

"Needles and pins, chiefly aken from originals in bronze, vary in length from an inch and a half to about eight inches." — Anthon, 1891

Needles and pins

"Needles and pins, chiefly aken from originals in bronze, vary in length from an inch and a half to…

"Paestum, the Greek Poseidonia, was a colony of Sybaris. The malarial atmosphere of the place led to its desertion in the ninth century of our era. Hence the buildings there were not used as quarries for later structures. The so-called 'Temple of Neptune' at Paestum is one of the best preserved monuments of antiquity."—Webster, 1913

Temple of Neptune

"Paestum, the Greek Poseidonia, was a colony of Sybaris. The malarial atmosphere of the place led to…

"These words, besides denoting absolute nakedness, were applied to any one who, being without an Amictus, wore only his tunic or indutus. In this state of nudity the ancients performed the operations of ploughing, sowing and reaping. The accompanying woodcut shows a man ploughing in his tunic only. This term applied to the warrior expressed the absence of some part of his armour." — Smith, 1873

Nudus

"These words, besides denoting absolute nakedness, were applied to any one who, being without an Amictus,…

"A greave, a leggin. A pair of greaves was one of the six articles of armour which formed the complete equipment of a Greek warrior, and likewise of a Roman soldier as fixed by Servius Tullius. They were made of various metals, with a lining probably of leather, felt, or cloth. Their form is shown in the accompanying cut. The figure is that of a fallen warrior, and is consequence of the bending of the knees, the greaves are seen to project a little above them. This statue also shows the ankle-rings, which were used to fasten the greaves immediately above the feet. The woodcut that follows shows the interior of a bronze shield, and a pair of bronze greaves found in the tomb of an Etruscan Museum. The greaves are made right and left." — Smith, 1873

Ocrea

"A greave, a leggin. A pair of greaves was one of the six articles of armour which formed the complete…

"A greave, a leggin. A pair of greaves was one of the six articles of armour which formed the complete equipment of a Greek warrior, and likewise of a Roman soldier as fixed by Servius Tullius. They were made of various metals, with a lining probably of leather, felt, or cloth. Their form is shown in the accompanying cut. The figure is that of a fallen warrior, and is consequence of the bending of the knees, the greaves are seen to project a little above them. This statue also shows the ankle-rings, which were used to fasten the greaves immediately above the feet. The woodcut that follows shows the interior of a bronze shield, and a pair of bronze greaves found in the tomb of an Etruscan Museum. The greaves are made right and left." — Smith, 1873

Ocrea

"A greave, a leggin. A pair of greaves was one of the six articles of armour which formed the complete…

"Buildings and Environs of Olympia (Restoration)" — Morey, 1903

Olympia Buildings

"Buildings and Environs of Olympia (Restoration)" — Morey, 1903

"From a very remote period, the Greeks had been accustomed to engage in contests of strength and agility during their times of festivity, and also at the funerals of distinguised persons. Iphitus conceived the idea of establishing a periodical festival in his own dominions, for the celebration of these ancient games, and of religious rites in honor of Jupiter and Hercules; and, having obtained the authority of the Delphinian oracle for carrying his design into execution, he instituted the festival, and appointed that it should be repeated every fourth year, at Olympia, a town of Elis." — Goodrich, 1844

Victors at the Olympic Games

"From a very remote period, the Greeks had been accustomed to engage in contests of strength and agility…

The Olympieum in Athens, Greece.

The Olympieum

The Olympieum in Athens, Greece.

"A diminutive through osculum from os, meaning "a little face," was the term applied to faces or heads of Bacchus, which were suspended in the vineyards to be turned in every direction by the wind. Whichsoever way they looked they were supposed to make, the vines in that quarter fruitful. The figure represents the countenance of Bacchus with a beautiful, mild, and propitious expression. the other figure represents a tree with four oscilla hung upon its branches. A syrinx and a pedum are placed at the root of the tree." — Smith, 1873

Oscillum

"A diminutive through osculum from os, meaning "a little face," was the term applied to faces or heads…

"Represents an ox adorned for sacrifice." — Anthon, 1891

Ox sacrifice

"Represents an ox adorned for sacrifice." — Anthon, 1891

"Victory of Paeonius (Restored)" — Morey, 1903

Paeonius

"Victory of Paeonius (Restored)" — Morey, 1903

"The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys no accurate conception of the form, material, or use of that which they denoted. The article designated by them was always a rectangular piece of cloth, exactly, or at least nearly square. It was indeed used in the very form in which it was taken from the loom, being made entirely by the weaver, without any aid from the tailor except to repair the injuries which it sustained by time. Whatever additional richness and beauty it received from the art of the dyer, was bestowed upon it before its materials were woven into cloth or even spun into thread. Most commonly it was used without having undergone any process of this kind. The raw material, such as wool, flax, or cotton, was manufactured in its natural state, and hence pallia were commonly white, although from the same cause brown, drab, and gray, were also prevailing colours." — Smith, 1873

Palium

"The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys no accurate conception…

"The <em>palla</em>, as well as the <em>pallium</em> and <em>palliolum</em>, was always a rectangular piece of cloth, exactly, or, at least, nearly square. It was, indeed, used in the very form in which it was taken from the loom, being made entirely by the weaver. Among the Greeks and Romans the most common material for the <em>palla</em> was wool. It was often folded about the body simply with a view to defend it from cold, and without any regard to gracefulness of appearance, as in the following cut, taken from an ancient intaglio." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Palla

"The palla, as well as the pallium and palliolum, was always a rectangular…

"An athletic game, in which all the powers of the fighter were called into action. The pancratium was one of the games or gymnastic contests which were exhibited at all the great festivals of Greece; it consisted of boxing and wrestling, and was reckoned to be one of the heavy or hard exercises, on account of the violent exertions it required, and for this reason it was not much practised in the gymnasia. In Homer we find neither the game nor the name of the pancratium mentioned, and as it was not introduced at the Olympic games until Ol. 33, we may presume that the game, though it may have existed long before in a rude state, was not brought to any degree of perfection until a short time before that event. The name of the combatants was Pancratiastae, or Pammachi. They fought naked, and had their bodies anointed and covered with sand, by which they were enabled to take hold of one another. When the contest began, each of the fighters might commence by boxing or by wrestling, accordingly as he thought he should be more successful in the one than in the other. The victory was not decided until one of the parties was killed, or lifted up a finger, thereby declaring that he was unable to continue the contest either from pain or fatigue." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pancratium

"An athletic game, in which all the powers of the fighter were called into action. The pancratium was…

Inside of the Parthenon

Parthenon

Inside of the Parthenon

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek goddess Athena, built in the 5th century BC on the Athenian Acropolis. It is the most important surviving building of Classical Greece, generally considered to be the culmination of the development of the Doric order. Its decorative sculptures are considered one of the high points of Greek art. The Parthenon is regarded as an enduring symbol of ancient Greece and of Athenian democracy, and is considered one of the world's greatest cultural monuments. The Greek Ministry of Culture is currently carrying out a program of restoration and reconstruction. Like most Greek temples, the Parthenon was used as a treasury, and for a time served as the treasury of the Delian League, which later became the Athenian Empire. In the 6th century AD, the Parthenon was converted into a Christian church dedicated to the Virgin. After the Ottoman conquest, it was converted into a mosque in the early 1460s, and it even had a minaret. On 26 September 1687 an Ottoman ammunition dump inside the building was ignited by Venetian bombardment. The resulting explosion severely damaged the Parthenon and its sculptures. In 1806, Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin removed some of the surviving sculptures, with Ottoman permission. These sculptures, now known as the Elgin or Parthenon Marbles, were sold in 1816 to the British Museum in London, where they are now displayed. The Greek government is committed to the return of the sculptures to Greece, so far with no success.

Parthenon

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek goddess Athena, built in the 5th century BC on the Athenian Acropolis.…

"The Parthenon is a celebrated temple at Athens, consecrated to Athena or Minerva, the protectress of the city, built on an elevated rock near the Acropolis, and has always been regarded as the most exquisite and perfect example of Grecian architecture. The Parthenon was erected about 448 B. C., in the time of Pericles, Phidias being the chief sculptor. It had a length of 228 feet, by a breadth of 100; it had eight columns beneath each pediment, and 15 on each side, exclusive of those at each end of the pediments, with which they formed 16 intercolumns, of 46 columns in all, exclusive of those within the building. This magnificent fane had resisted the ravages of time down to the 17th century, being by turns a pagan temple, a Christian church, and also a Turkish mosque, till at the siege of Athens by the Venetians, in 1687, a shell fell on the roof of the Acropolis or citadel, which, firing the magazine beneath, shattered that building and the Parthenon into blackened ruins."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Parthenon

"The Parthenon is a celebrated temple at Athens, consecrated to Athena or Minerva, the protectress of…

Bass-reliefs from the frieze of the Parthenon.

Parthenon Frieze

Bass-reliefs from the frieze of the Parthenon.

"The Athenians, on their return to Attica, after the defeat of the Persians, found their city ruined and their country desolate." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Modern Parthenon

"The Athenians, on their return to Attica, after the defeat of the Persians, found their city ruined…

"The patera was a broad and comparatively shallow bowl used for libations, and also for drinking out of at banquets. The following cut gives a front and side view of a bronze patera found at Pompeii." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Patera

"The patera was a broad and comparatively shallow bowl used for libations, and also for drinking out…

"A round plate or dish. The paterae of the most common kind were small plates of the common red earthenware, on which an ornamental pattern was drawn, and which were sometimes entirely black. The more valuable paterae were metallic, being chiefly of bronze but every family, raised above poverty, possessed one of silver, together with a silver salt-cellar. The preceding cut exhibits a highly ornamented patera, made of bronze. The view of the upper surface is accompanied by a sideview, showing the form and depth of the vessel." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Patera

"A round plate or dish. The paterae of the most common kind were small plates of the common red earthenware,…

"A shepherd's crook. On account of its connection with pastoral life, the crook is often seen in works of ancient art, in the hands of Pan, Satyrs, Fauns, and shepherds. It was also the usual attribute of Thalia, as the muse of pastoral poetry." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pedum

"A shepherd's crook. On account of its connection with pastoral life, the crook is often seen in works…

"A small shield, Iphicrates, observing that the ancient Clipeus was cumbrous and inconvenient, introduced among the Greeks a much smaller and lighter shield, from which those who bore it took the name of peltastae. It consisted principally of a frame of wood or wicker-work, covered with skin or leather. An elegant form of the pelta is exhibited in the preceting cut, representing Penthesilea, Queen of the Amazons, in the act of offering aid to Priam." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pelta

"A small shield, Iphicrates, observing that the ancient Clipeus was cumbrous and inconvenient, introduced…

"An outer garment, strictly worn by females, and thus corresponding to the himation or pallium, the outer garment worn by men. Like all other pieces of cloth used for the Amictus, it was often fastened by means of a brooch. It was, however, frequently worn without a brooch, in the manner represented in the annexed cut. Each of the females in this group wears a tunic falling down to her feet, and over it an ample pepius, which she passes entirely round her body and then throws the loose extremity of it over her left shoulder and behind her back, as is distinctly seen in the sitting figure. Of all the productions of the loom, pepli were those on which the greatest skill and labour were bestowed. so various and tasteful were the subjects which they represented, that poets delighted to describe them. The art of weaving them was entirely oriental; and those of the most splendid dyes and curious workmanship were imported from Tyre and Sidon. They often constituted a very important part of the treasures of a temple, having been presented to the divinity by sppliants and devotees." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Peplum

"An outer garment, strictly worn by females, and thus corresponding to the himation or pallium, the…

"The <em>peplus</em> was a shawl which commonly formed part of the dress of females. It was often fastened by meeans ofa brooch, but was frequently worn without one, in the manner represented in the annexed cut, which is copied from one of Sir W. Hamilton's vases. Each of the females in this group wears an under garmet falling down to her feet, and over it an ample <em>peplus</em>, or shawl, which she passes entirely round her body, and then throws the loose extremity of it over her left shoulder, and behind her back as distinctly seen in the sitting figure." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Peplus

"The peplus was a shawl which commonly formed part of the dress of females. It was often fastened…

"A wallet, made of leather, worn suspended at the side by rustics and by travellers to carry their provisions, and adopted in imitation of them by the Cynic philosophers. This woodcut is the representation of a goat-herd with his staff and wallet." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pera

"A wallet, made of leather, worn suspended at the side by rustics and by travellers to carry their provisions,…

An influential and important leader of Athens during the Athenian Golden Age.

Pericles

An influential and important leader of Athens during the Athenian Golden Age.

"An anklet or bangle, worn by the Orientals, the Greeks, and the Roman ladies also. It decorated the leg in the same manner as the bracelet adorns the wrist and the necklace the throat. The word, however, is sometimes used in the same sense as the Latin feminalia, that is, drawers reaching from the navel to the knees." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Periscelis

"An anklet or bangle, worn by the Orientals, the Greeks, and the Roman ladies also. It decorated the…

"This was a low boot of untanned hide, worn by ploughman and shepards." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Pero

"This was a low boot of untanned hide, worn by ploughman and shepards." — Anthon, 1891

The fate of the Persian Embassadors at Sparta.

Persian Embassador

The fate of the Persian Embassadors at Sparta.

"A mask. Masks were worn by Greek and Roman actors in nearly all dramatic representations. This custom arose undoubtedly from the practice of smearing the face with certain juices and colours, and of appearing in disguise, at the festivals of Bacchus. Now as the Greek drama arose out of these festivals, it is highly probable that some mode of disguising the face was as old as the drama itself. Choerilus of Samos, however, is said to have been the first who introduced regular masks. Other writers attribute the invention of masks to Thesuis or Aeschylus, though the latter had probably only the merit of perfecting and completing the whole theatrical apparatus and costume. Some masks covered, like the masks of modern times, only the face, but they appear more generally to have covered the whole head down to the shoulders, for we always find the hair belonging to a mask described as being a part of it; and this must have been the case in tragedy more especially, as it was necessary to make the head correspond to the stature of an actor, which was heightened by the cothurnus. The annexed cut represents the grotesque mask of a Satyr, together with a tragic mask, which are contined in the British Museum. some of the oldest manuscripts of Terence contain representations of Roman masks, and from these manuscripts they have been copied in several modern editions of that poet. The cut annexed contains representations of four of these masks prefixed to the Andria." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Persona

"A mask. Masks were worn by Greek and Roman actors in nearly all dramatic representations. This custom…

"A mask. Masks were worn by Greek and Roman actors in nearly all dramatic representations. This custom arose undoubtedly from the practice of smearing the face with certain juices and colours, and of appearing in disguise, at the festivals of Bacchus. Now as the Greek drama arose out of these festivals, it is highly probable that some mode of disguising the face was as old as the drama itself. Choerilus of Samos, however, is said to have been the first who introduced regular masks. Other writers attribute the invention of masks to Thesuis or Aeschylus, though the latter had probably only the merit of perfecting and completing the whole theatrical apparatus and costume. Some masks covered, like the masks of modern times, only the face, but they appear more generally to have covered the whole head down to the shoulders, for we always find the hair belonging to a mask described as being a part of it; and this must have been the case in tragedy more especially, as it was necessary to make the head correspond to the stature of an actor, which was heightened by the cothurnus. The annexed cut represents the grotesque mask of a Satyr, together with a tragic mask, which are contined in the British Museum. some of the oldest manuscripts of Terence contain representations of Roman masks, and from these manuscripts they have been copied in several modern editions of that poet. The cut annexed contains representations of four of these masks prefixed to the Andria." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Persona

"A mask. Masks were worn by Greek and Roman actors in nearly all dramatic representations. This custom…

"The Petasus differed from the pileus or simple skull-cap in having a wide brim: the etymology of the word, expressed the distinctive shape of these hats. It was preferred to the skull-cap as a protection from the sun." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Petasus

"The Petasus differed from the pileus or simple skull-cap in having a wide brim: the etymology of the…

"A quiver, was principally made of hide or leather, and was adorned with gold, painting, and braiding. it had a lid, and was suspended from the right shoulder by a belt passing over the breast and behind the back. Its most common position was on the left hip, and is so seen in the annexed figures, the right-hand one representing an Amazon, and the left-hand an Asiatic archer." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Phaetra

"A quiver, was principally made of hide or leather, and was adorned with gold, painting, and braiding.…

"Phidias was the chief glory of the administration of Pericles. To him was committed the work of making the Parthenon sublime. From his studio went forth trophy after trophy to adorn the crowning glory of the Acropolis."

Phidias in His Study

"Phidias was the chief glory of the administration of Pericles. To him was committed the work of making…

"Coin of Phidon" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Phidon Coin

"Coin of Phidon" — Morey, 1903

"Philip II. (Coin)" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Philip

"Philip II. (Coin)" — Morey, 1903

"Philip V." &mdash; Morey, 1903

Philip

"Philip V." — Morey, 1903

"A more graceful mode of wearing the <em>palla</em> was to attach it by means of a brooch, and allow it to hang down from the shoulders, as in the following cut, representing the statue of Phocion in the Vatican." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Statue of Phocion

"A more graceful mode of wearing the palla was to attach it by means of a brooch, and allow…

"Any piece of felt; more especially, a skull-cap of felt, a hat. These seems no reason to doubt that felting is a more ancient invention than weaving, not that both of these arts came into Europe from Asia. From the Greeks, who were acquainted with this article as early as the age of Homer, the use of felt passed together with its name to the Romans. Its principal use was to make coverings of the head for the male sex, and the most common one was a simple skull-cap." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pileus

"Any piece of felt; more especially, a skull-cap of felt, a hat. These seems no reason to doubt that…

A woman plays a Greek funeral pipe in the funeral procession of Hector.

Greek funeral pipe

A woman plays a Greek funeral pipe in the funeral procession of Hector.

"A cart or wagon. It had commonly two wheels, but sometimes four, and it was then called the plaustrum majus. Besides the wheels and axle the plaustrum consisted of a strong pole (temo), to the hinder part of which was fastened a table of wooden planks. The blocks of stone, or other things to be carried, were either laid upon this table without any other support, or an additional security was obtained by the use either of boards at the sides, or of a large wicker basket tied upon the cart. The annexed cut exhibits a cart, the body of which is supplied by a basket. The commonest kind of cart-wheel was that called tympanum, the "drum," from its resemblance to the musical instrument of the same name. It was nearly a foot in thickness, and was made either by sawing the trunk of a tree across in a horizontal direction, or by nailing together boards of the requisite shape and size. These wheels advanced slowly, and made a loud creaking, which was heard to a great distance." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Plaustrum

"A cart or wagon. It had commonly two wheels, but sometimes four, and it was then called the plaustrum…

"Shows the bema, or platform, from which orators addressed the assembled citizens."&mdash;Webster, 1913

Pnyx

"Shows the bema, or platform, from which orators addressed the assembled citizens."—Webster, 1913

"Porch of the Maidens (Caryatides)" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Porch Maidens

"Porch of the Maidens (Caryatides)" — Morey, 1903

"Temple of Poseidon at Paestum." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Poseidon Temple

"Temple of Poseidon at Paestum." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910