The French Buildings and Monuments ClipArt gallery offers 132 illustrations of churches, cathedrals, government buildings, castles, monuments, and other famous French structures.

The house in which Napoleon I was born, located in Ajaccio, France.

Napoleon's Birthplace at Ajaccio

The house in which Napoleon I was born, located in Ajaccio, France.

"Plan of Amiens Cathedral. A, Apsidal aisle. B B, Outer aisles of choir. F G, Transepts. H, Central tower. I J, Western turrets. M, Principal or western doorway. N N, Western side doors. P Q, North and south aisles of choir. R R R, Chapels. T U, North and south aisles of nave." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Amiens Cathedral

"Plan of Amiens Cathedral. A, Apsidal aisle. B B, Outer aisles of choir. F G, Transepts. H, Central…

The cross section of the Amiens Cathedral. (E) triforium, (F) clerestory.

Amiens Cathedral

The cross section of the Amiens Cathedral. (E) triforium, (F) clerestory.

"The remains of Ampitheater of Arles, France. "-Whitney, 1902

Ampitheater

"The remains of Ampitheater of Arles, France. "-Whitney, 1902

"The remains of Ampitheater of Nimes, France. "-Whitney, 1902

Ampitheater

"The remains of Ampitheater of Nimes, France. "-Whitney, 1902

"Roman aqueduct near Nimes, in France."—Colby, 1899

Aqueduct

"Roman aqueduct near Nimes, in France."—Colby, 1899

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France honoring those who fought for France, commissioned during the Napoleonic wars.

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France honoring those who fought for France, commissioned during the Napoleonic…

"In the center of the Place de l'Étoile, from which twelve broad avenues radiate in all directions. Commenced by Napoleon in 1805, but not completed until the reign of Louis Philippe. It is the largest triumphal arch in the world, being 162 feet high and 147 feet wide. The monument is adorned with groups of sculpture representing the military triumphs of the revolutionary and Napoleonic armies."—Webster, 1920

Arc de Triomphe

"In the center of the Place de l'Étoile, from which twelve broad avenues radiate in all directions.…

The Arc de Triomphe de L'etolile in Paris

Arc de Triomphe de L'etolile

The Arc de Triomphe de L'etolile in Paris

A structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. The arch is invariably a free-standing structure, quite seperate from city gates or walls. In its simplest form a triumphal arch consists of two pillars connected by an arch, crowned with a superstructure or attic on which a statue might be mounted or which bears commemorative inscriptions. More elaborate triumphal arches have more than one archway, typically three or five of varying sizes.

Arch of Triumph

A structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. The arch…

The amphitheater of Arles is a roman amphitheater in the southern French town of Arles. It is still in use today.

The Amphitheater of Arles

The amphitheater of Arles is a roman amphitheater in the southern French town of Arles. It is still…

An illustration of the Avenue de Champs Élysées in Paris, France. It is known for its luxury specialty shops and is one of the most famous streets in the world. It was originally a stretch of fields and market gardens.

Avenue de Champs Élysées

An illustration of the Avenue de Champs Élysées in Paris, France. It is known for its luxury…

"The taking of the Bastile, July 14, 1789. The Parisian mob, not satisfied with the formation of the National Assembly, demanded to be armed in their own defense; and when this was refused, rushed off to seize the store of arms kept in the Hotel des Invalides. Angered by the report that the guns of the old prison of the Bastile were to be trained on the people, they suddenly gathered around its walls and began an attack. This ancient prison had been the scene of many oppressions in the past. Its foul dungeons and the sufferings of those who were confined there had made it an object of popular hatred. During Louis XVI's reign, however, it had fallen into disuse, and it can not be said that at that time it was worse than any other prison. Nevertheless, to the mob it still stood as the symbol of despotism. The governor of the prison surrendered, but the mob murdered him, together with some others, and carried the heads of their victims on pikes through the streets. The few prisoners that were within were set free. Although were was nothing especially heroic about the taking of the Bastile, the event was of great significance, for it seemed to say that a new age had begun. Throughout Europe it was looked upon as a triumph of the people over despotism, and by the liberals of all countries it was hailed with joy."—Colby, 1899

Bastile

"The taking of the Bastile, July 14, 1789. The Parisian mob, not satisfied with the formation of the…

The taking of the Bastille

Bastille

The taking of the Bastille

The Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris remembered by the storming of the Bastille in the French Revolution.

Bastille

The Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris remembered by the storming of the Bastille in the French Revolution.

One of the earliest square towers near Orleans, France.

Tower of Beaugency

One of the earliest square towers near Orleans, France.

"In Belgium the Roman Renaissance was introduced about the same time as in France: but an unmistakable distinction is visible between the two styles. The buildings in Belgium have a certain stamp by which they essentially differ from those of France; in fact, the whole style might be designated as modern Belgian. The peculiarity of the treatment lies mainly in a predilection for that Renaissance which is called the Roccoco style in conjunction with heavy and often very [skillfully] managed; but still the details are for the most part heavier and more robust than those that belong to the best Renaissance style. [This image] shows this peculiarity, but it is somewhat less marked than in many other instances."

View of the Opera House in Paris

"In Belgium the Roman Renaissance was introduced about the same time as in France: but an unmistakable…

The Court of the Palace at Blois is an example of Renaissance architecture.

Blois Palace

The Court of the Palace at Blois is an example of Renaissance architecture.

Court of the Castle of Blois

Blois, Castle of

Court of the Castle of Blois

The Chateau of Blois is located in the Loire Valley in France. It was the residence of many French Kings, and the place where Joan of Arc was blessed. The Chateau of Blois is built in the middle of town, and consists of several buildings that were built between the 13th and 17th century.

Chateau of Blois

The Chateau of Blois is located in the Loire Valley in France. It was the residence of many French Kings,…

The Cathedral of Bourges is located in Bourges, France. It Cathedral was built in dedication to Saint Stephen. The structure of the Cathedral is designed in a Gothic style with the use of flying buttresses.

Cathedral of Bourges

The Cathedral of Bourges is located in Bourges, France. It Cathedral was built in dedication to Saint…

An illustration of the feudal castle of Rouen. Rouen is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France on the River Seine, and currently the capital of the Haute-Normandie region.

Feudal Castle of Rouen

An illustration of the feudal castle of Rouen. Rouen is the historical capital city of Normandy, in…

The Ameins Cathedral viewed from the front.

Ameins Cathedral

The Ameins Cathedral viewed from the front.

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens (French: Cath&eacute;drale Notre-Dame d'Amiens), or simply Amiens Cathedral, is the tallest complete cathedral in France, with the greatest interior volume (estimated at 200,000 m<sup>3</sup>). The vaults of the nave are 42.30 m high, the tallest nave vaults in any completed French cathedral, and surpassed only by the incomplete Beauvais Cathedral. This monumental cathedral is located in Amiens, the chief city of Picardy, in the Somme River valley a little over 100 kilometers north of Paris.

Amiens Cathedral

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame d'Amiens), or simply Amiens…

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens or simply Amiens Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral and seat of the Bishop of Amiens, Jean-Luc Marie Maurice Louis Bouilleret. The cathedral is the tallest complete cathedral in France, with the greatest interior volume (estimated at 200,000 m&sup3;). The vaults of the nave are 42.30 m high, the tallest nave vaults in any completed French cathedral, and surpassed only by the incomplete Beauvais Cathedral. This monumental cathedral is located in Amiens, the chief city of Picardy, in the Somme River valley a little over 100 kilometers north of Paris.

Amiens Cathedral

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens or simply Amiens Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral and seat…

An illustration of the floor plan of Angouleme Cathedral. A first cathedral was built on the site a primitive, pre-Christian sanctuary, in the 4th century AD. The edifice was destroyed when the town was taken by Clovis after the Battle of Vouill&eacute; (507). Another cathedral was consecrated in 560, but this was also set on fire by the Vikings/Normans some two centuries later. A third cathedral was then constructed under bishop Grimoard, abbot of Saint-Pierre de Brant&ocirc;me. The new church was consecrated in 1017. However, at the beginning of the 12th century the citizens started to consider it too small for to the wealth of the county. The designer was bishop Gerard II, one of the most important French figures of the time, who was a professor, Papal legate for four popes and also a notable artist. Works began about 1110 and finished in 1128.

Angouleme Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Angouleme Cathedral. A first cathedral was built on the site a…

An illustration of the floor plan of Chartres Cathedral. The Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, (French: Cath&eacute;drale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 80 kilometres (50 mi) southwest of Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture.

Chartres Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Chartres Cathedral. The Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, (French:…

The Chartres cathedral viewed from the front.

Chartres Cathedral

The Chartres cathedral viewed from the front.

An illustration of the floor plan of Sens Cathedral. Sens Cathedral, Cathedral of St. &Eacute;tienne or St. Stephen's Cathedral, Sens (Cath&eacute;drale Saint-&Eacute;tienne de Sens) is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Sens, Bourgogne. One of the earliest Gothic buildings in France, it was begun in 1140 and belongs mainly to the 12th century, but was not complete until early in the 16th century. The architecture of its choir influenced, through the architect William of Sens, that of the choir of Canterbury Cathedral.

Sens Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Sens Cathedral. Sens Cathedral, Cathedral of St. Étienne…

The Ch&acirc;teau de Beaumesnil was begun in 1633 by Jacques de Nonant for his wife Marie Dauvet Desmaret. Construction lasted until 1640.Today, Beaumesnil is a commune, the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic, in the Eure department in Haute-Normandie in northern France."Although Du Cerceau was obligated to leave France in the year 1604, the impulse which he had given in the direction of the above-mentioned manner led to its being generally adopted. The new buildings were more correct, but less picturesque than those built during the earlier period of the French Renaissance, and a certain insipidity seems to characterize the various structures erected during the reigns of Henry IV., and especially Louis XIII. As is shown [here], a combination of free-stone and brick was restored to in such a way that the former was employed for the mouldings, and for the quoins and dressings of the doors and windows, whilst brick was used for the spaces between. In the case of the windows the free-stone introduced assumed the forms of quoins. If ornamentation had been previously excessive, it now retired into the background, and was only employed in moderation; and the method of its treatment began to be distinguished from that of the former period. The forms of the details above all began to lose in purity: rustications were inappropriately introduced in the walls and columns, and the roofs were made high and steep, which gave the rest of the building a heavy and squat appearance, whilst the numerous turret-shaped chimneys, which were necessitated by these high roofs, formed a peculiar feature in the construction. The Roccoco, or Baroque Style, was beginning at the same time to exert its influence. Commencing from the second half of the seventeenth century, this new architectural deviation became prevalent in all civilized countries, owing to the splendor and influence of the French power and manners, and the influence of Italian art was consequently paralyzed. [This image] gives a characteristic example of French architecture of this period of the Later Renaissance, showing the peculiarities which have been described above."

Château de Beaumesnil

The Château de Beaumesnil was begun in 1633 by Jacques de Nonant for his wife Marie Dauvet Desmaret.…

The royal Ch&acirc;teau de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France is one of the most recognizable ch&acirc;teaux in the world because of its very distinct French Renaissance architecture that blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Italian structures."The artistic influence of Italy came into operation in France sooner than in other European countries, for as early as the fifteenth century the Renaissance style was introduced there by Italian architects, as, for instance, by Fra Giocondo, who was summoned thither by Louis XII. But at the epoch the Flamboyant style was still in its vigour, and the buildings then erected could not extricate themselves from its influence. The consequence was that a blending of the two styles temporarily prevailed, as, for instance in the Ch&acirc;teau de Blois, which Louis XII. caused to be built, and which has lately been restored by Duban. It was in these country residences of the nobility, especially on the banks of the Loire, that this architectural activity was displayed during the earlier period of the Renaissance; amongst their number the Ch&acirc;teau de Chambord [shown here] is most worthy of notice. The pilasters and their mouldings of the Renaissance style were, it is true, somewhat rudely carried out, and in the earlier period were combined with certain elements of the Flamboyant style. Highly ornamental gables and dormer-windows. especially, were executed in the latter style. Buildings were contemporaneously constructed entirely in the Flamboyant style, as, for instance, the Cathedral, the Palais de Justice, and the H&acirc;tel Bourgtheroulde, all at Rouen, and the H&acirc;tel de Ville at Compi&egrave;gne."

Château de Chambord

The royal Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France is one of the most recognizable…

"This fine structure was built in the eighteenth century as a palace for members of the Bourbon-Cond&eacute; family. It became national property during the French Revolution. The fa&ccedil;ade, which faces the Pont de la Concorde, is in the style of an ancient temple."&mdash;Webster, 1920

Chamber of Deputies (Paris)

"This fine structure was built in the eighteenth century as a palace for members of the Bourbon-Condé…

The Chateau of Chambord is located in the commune of Chambord in the Loire Valley, France. The castle is famous for its French Renaissance architecture that blends French Medieval with classical Italian styles. It was constructed by King Francois I, and is the largest castle in Loire Valley.

Chateau of Chambord

The Chateau of Chambord is located in the commune of Chambord in the Loire Valley, France. The castle…

The Sainte Chapelle viewed from the front.

Sainte Chapelle

The Sainte Chapelle viewed from the front.

The cathedral of Chartres is a roman catholic cathedral in Chartres, France. Built in a Gothic style, the Cathedral has two different spires.

Cathedral of Chartres

The cathedral of Chartres is a roman catholic cathedral in Chartres, France. Built in a Gothic style,…

The romantisit, J. William Turner, was famous for his drawings of landscapes such as: lakes, castles, ruins, ships and coast lines. In this picture he displays his technique. The piece is from the "Rivers of France".

Chateau D'Amboise

The romantisit, J. William Turner, was famous for his drawings of landscapes such as: lakes, castles,…

The Chateau D'If in Marseilles, France.

Chateau D'If

The Chateau D'If in Marseilles, France.

The Ch&acirc;teau de Coucy is a French castle in the commune of Coucy-le-Ch&acirc;teau-Auffrique, in the d&eacute;partement of Aisne, built in the 13th century and renovated by Viollet-le-Duc in the 19th. In 1917, the German army dynamited the keep and the four towers using 28 tons of explosives.

Chateau de Coucy

The Château de Coucy is a French castle in the commune of Coucy-le-Château-Auffrique, in…

A well preserved building, in which Gothic forms are everwhere perceptible, under the veil of the Renaissance decoration.

Chenonceaux Chateau

A well preserved building, in which Gothic forms are everwhere perceptible, under the veil of the Renaissance…

"Romanesque church of Chatel-Montagne in the department of Allier, France." -Breasted, 1914

Chatel-Montagne

"Romanesque church of Chatel-Montagne in the department of Allier, France." -Breasted, 1914

The Chateau of Chenonceaux is a castle in the small village of Chenonceaux in the Loire Valley, France. It was built around the 11th century and the current manor was designed by French Renaissance Architect Philibert Delorme. The castle was inhabited by many French Kings.

Chateau of Chenonceaux

The Chateau of Chenonceaux is a castle in the small village of Chenonceaux in the Loire Valley, France.…

The Bergues Clock Tower. Bergues, a town in the Department of Nord, France, on the Colme river.

Clock Tower

The Bergues Clock Tower. Bergues, a town in the Department of Nord, France, on the Colme river.

The Column of July, commemorating the Revolution of 1830.

Column of July

The Column of July, commemorating the Revolution of 1830.

A public square in Paris, France. It is the largest square in the French capital.

The Place de la Concorde

A public square in Paris, France. It is the largest square in the French capital.

The hall where the National Convention took place, which held executive power in France during the French First Republic.

The Hall of the Convention

The hall where the National Convention took place, which held executive power in France during the French…

French castle of Coucy-le-Chateau built in the thirteenth century. The parts are: (A) moat, (B) round donjon, (C) inner court, and (D) the residence of the lord.

Coucy le Chateau

French castle of Coucy-le-Chateau built in the thirteenth century. The parts are: (A) moat, (B) round…

The center of the courtyard of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

Ecole des Beaux-Arts Courtyard

The center of the courtyard of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

A gothic cathedral located in Paris, France. Viewed from the southeast.

Notre Dame

A gothic cathedral located in Paris, France. Viewed from the southeast.

"The Eiffel Tower is a notable structure in Paris, France. The plans for the Paris exposition of 1889 included a monstrous iron tower, to be raised on the Champs-de-Mars, 1,000 feet high. The designer, Gustave Eiffel, constructed it of iron lattice-work, with three sets of elevators giving access to the summit."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Eiffel Tower

"The Eiffel Tower is a notable structure in Paris, France. The plans for the Paris exposition of 1889…

The Eiffel Tower, a global icon on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France stands 984 feet high.

Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower, a global icon on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France stands 984 feet high.

The west corner dome of the main exposition building in Paris.

Exposition Building

The west corner dome of the main exposition building in Paris.

"The same licence in the treatment and application of forms is also displayed in secular buildings. The fa&ccedil;ades and their details were especially treated with the greatest freedom, and the original construction intention of the latter was no longer a matter of consideration. [This image] gives an example of the Roccoco style as applied to dwelling houses."

Façade at Paris in the style of Louis XV

"The same licence in the treatment and application of forms is also displayed in secular buildings.…

A castle in the town of Foix, France, which is the center of the Cathars.

Castle of Foix

A castle in the town of Foix, France, which is the center of the Cathars.

"Gable of the South Transept Door of Notre Dame, Paris; 13th century." -Whitney, 1911

Gable at Notre Dame de Paris

"Gable of the South Transept Door of Notre Dame, Paris; 13th century." -Whitney, 1911

"Galleries of the west front of the Cathedral of Amiens, 13th century, illustrating treatment of galleries as a decorative feature." -Whitney, 1911

Galleries of Cathedral of Amiens

"Galleries of the west front of the Cathedral of Amiens, 13th century, illustrating treatment of galleries…

The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct and bridge that was built over the Gard River by the Roman Empire. It is located in Southern France, in the Vers-Pont-du-Gard and Remoulins area. The bridge is built on three levels. The lower level has 6 arches and carries a road, the middle level has 11 arches, and the upper level has 35 arches and was used as a water conduit.

Pont du Gard

The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct and bridge that was built over the Gard River by the Roman Empire. It…

The Church of St. Genevieve

Genevieve

The Church of St. Genevieve

An illustration of the Hotel de Cluny in Paris, France. The Hotel de Cluny is a small palace from the Middle Ages which is now a museum containing objects relating to the medieval times.

Hotel de Cluny

An illustration of the Hotel de Cluny in Paris, France. The Hotel de Cluny is a small palace from the…

An illustration of the Church of the Hotel des Invalides located in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France. This complex of buildings contains museums and monuments all relating to the military history of France.

Church of the Hotel des Invalides

An illustration of the Church of the Hotel des Invalides located in the 7th arrondissement of Paris,…

The same gothic principles controlled the designing of houses, farm buildings, barns, granaries, and the like. The finest palaces are well represented by the Ducal Palace at Nancy (1476), the Hotel de Cluny at Paris (1485), and the Hotel Jacques at Bourges. These palaces are elaborately planned, with large halls, many staircases, and handsome courts; they are also extremely picturesque with their square and circular towers, slender turrets, elaborate dormers, and rich carved detail.

Hotel Jacques Coeur, Bourges

The same gothic principles controlled the designing of houses, farm buildings, barns, granaries, and…