The official seal of the U.S. state of Arkansas in 1889.

Arkansas

The official seal of the U.S. state of Arkansas in 1889.

The United States seal of Arkansas.

Arkansas

The United States seal of Arkansas.

The state banner of Arkansas, the bear state.

Arkansas

The state banner of Arkansas, the bear state.

Seal of the state of Arkansas, 1876

Arkansas seal

Seal of the state of Arkansas, 1876

Seal of the state of Arkansas, 1876

Arkansas seal

Seal of the state of Arkansas, 1876

An view of Hot Springs, Arkansas which is nestled in a valley between two mountains. Hot Springs is traditionally known for the natural spring water that gives it its name, flowing out of the ground at a temperature of 147 degrees Fahrenheit. Also is the home town of former President Bill Clinton.

Hot Springs, Arkanasas

An view of Hot Springs, Arkansas which is nestled in a valley between two mountains. Hot Springs is…

George Izard (21 October 1776 - 22 November 1828) was a General in the United States Army during the War of 1812 and a Governor of the Arkansas Territory.

George Izard

George Izard (21 October 1776 - 22 November 1828) was a General in the United States Army during the…

First Governor of Arkansas

John Law

First Governor of Arkansas

James Miller (25 April 1776 - 7 July 1851) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New Hampshire, the first Governor of Arkansas Territory, and a Brigadier General in the United States Army during the War of 1812.

James Miller

James Miller (25 April 1776 - 7 July 1851) was a member of the United States House of Representatives…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: "On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

An illustration of Arkansas State Penitentiary as pictured in 1874. The prisoners housed were the main labor force behind Little Rock's capital building. The capital building was built on the prison grounds.

Arkansas State Penitentiary

An illustration of Arkansas State Penitentiary as pictured in 1874. The prisoners housed were the main…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

The Arkansas State capital Building, located in Little Rock, is the seat of government of the state of Arkansas. The exterior of the Capital is made of limestone, which was quarried in Batesville, AR. Total construction was $2.2 million with today's value of the building being $320 million. The front entrance doors are made of bronze, which are ten feet tall, four inches thick, and were purchased from Tiffany's in New Tork for $10,000. The cupola is covered in 24 karat gold leaf. Construction took 16 years -- from 1899 to 1915.

Arkansas State Capital

The Arkansas State capital Building, located in Little Rock, is the seat of government of the state…