Decorative letter 'a', with a hooded figure reading a book.

A

Decorative letter 'a', with a hooded figure reading a book.

"A coarse woolen stuff, woven of goats, or camels' or other hair or wool in Syria, Arabia, and neighboring countries. An outer garment made of the above simple in form, worn by the Arabs of the desert."—Wright, 1902

Aba

"A coarse woolen stuff, woven of goats, or camels' or other hair or wool in Syria, Arabia, and neighboring…

A cloak chiefly worn by soldiers, and thus opposed to the toga, the garb of peace. The abolla was used by by the lower classes at Rome, and consequently by the philosophers who affected severity of manners and life.

Abolla

A cloak chiefly worn by soldiers, and thus opposed to the toga, the garb of peace. The abolla was used…

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

Abolla

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

"A mourning-cloak butterfly near a branch." — Goodrich, 1859

Mourning-Cloak Butterfly

"A mourning-cloak butterfly near a branch." — Goodrich, 1859

"The chlamys was a species of cloak or scarf, oblong instead of square, its length being generally about twice its breadth." — Anthon, 1891

Chlamys

"The chlamys was a species of cloak or scarf, oblong instead of square, its length being generally about…

"An ecclesiastical vestment, worn during the celebration of mass, at processions, vespers, and other soleminities. The cope was originally a cloak worn for ordinary purposes. In form it is a semicircle, without sleeves and with a hood." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Cope

"An ecclesiastical vestment, worn during the celebration of mass, at processions, vespers, and other…

A side robe of homely or course clothe.

Cope

A side robe of homely or course clothe.

An illustration of a mantle, a type of loose garment usually worn over indoor clothing to serve the same purpose as an overcoat, on a guard.

Mantle

An illustration of a mantle, a type of loose garment usually worn over indoor clothing to serve the…

"A thick cloak, cheifly used by the Romans in traveling, instead of the toga, as a protection against the cold and rain. It appears to have had no sleeves, and only an opening for the head, as shown in the preceding figure." — Smith, 1873

Paenula

"A thick cloak, cheifly used by the Romans in traveling, instead of the toga, as a protection against…

"The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys no accurate conception of the form, material, or use of that which they denoted. The article designated by them was always a rectangular piece of cloth, exactly, or at least nearly square. It was indeed used in the very form in which it was taken from the loom, being made entirely by the weaver, without any aid from the tailor except to repair the injuries which it sustained by time. Whatever additional richness and beauty it received from the art of the dyer, was bestowed upon it before its materials were woven into cloth or even spun into thread. Most commonly it was used without having undergone any process of this kind. The raw material, such as wool, flax, or cotton, was manufactured in its natural state, and hence pallia were commonly white, although from the same cause brown, drab, and gray, were also prevailing colours." — Smith, 1873

Palium

"The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys no accurate conception…

"The <em>palla</em>, as well as the <em>pallium</em> and <em>palliolum</em>, was always a rectangular piece of cloth, exactly, or, at least, nearly square. It was, indeed, used in the very form in which it was taken from the loom, being made entirely by the weaver. Among the Greeks and Romans the most common material for the <em>palla</em> was wool. It was often folded about the body simply with a view to defend it from cold, and without any regard to gracefulness of appearance, as in the following cut, taken from an ancient intaglio." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Palla

"The palla, as well as the pallium and palliolum, was always a rectangular…

"The cloak worn by a Roman general commanding an army, his principal officers and personal attendants, in contradistinction to the sagum of the common soldiers, and the toga or garb of peace. It was the practice for a Roman magistrate, after he had received imperium from the comitia curiata and offered up his vows in the capitol, to march out of the city arrayed in the paludamentum, attended by his lictors in similar attire, nor could he again enter the gates undil he had formally divested himself of this emblem of military power. The paludamentum was open in front, reached down to the knees or a litle lower, and hung loosely over the shoulders, being fastened across the chest by a clasp. The colour of the paludamentum was commonly white or purple, and hence it was marked and remembered that Crassus no the morning of the fatal battle of carrhae went forth in a dark-coloured mantle." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Paludamentum

"The cloak worn by a Roman general commanding an army, his principal officers and personal attendants,…

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of the sagum worn by the northern nations of Europe may be seen in the following cut from the column of Trajan, representing three Sarmatians with saga." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Sagum

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of…