The Admiralty Flag is a flag of Great Britain.

Admiralty Flag

The Admiralty Flag is a flag of Great Britain.

The Banner is a flag of Great Britain.

Banner

The Banner is a flag of Great Britain.

This is a flag of Great Britain.

Blazon of Union Flag

This is a flag of Great Britain.

The Blue Ensign is a flag of Great Britain. It is the distinctive ensign of the royal naval reserve.

Blue Ensign

The Blue Ensign is a flag of Great Britain. It is the distinctive ensign of the royal naval reserve.

Boat with paddlewheel on side.

Boat with paddlewheel

Boat with paddlewheel on side.

"British flag. This is a representation of one of the flags surrendered at Yorktown, and presented to Washington. I made this sketch of the flag itself, then in the Museum at Alexandria, in Virginia. It belonged to the seventh regiment. The size of the flag is six feet long, and five feet four inches wide. The ground is blue; the central stripe of the cross red; the marginal ones white. In the center is a crown, and beneath it a garter with its inscription, 'Honi soit qui mal y pense,' inclosing a full-blown rose. These are neatly embroidered with silk. The fabric of the flag is heavy twilled silk."—Lossing, 1851

British Flag

"British flag. This is a representation of one of the flags surrendered at Yorktown, and presented to…

An illustration of a parade of children in costumes.

Parade of Children in Costumes

An illustration of a parade of children in costumes.

The colonial flags from 1775.

Colonial Flags

The colonial flags from 1775.

The Confederate Flag

Confederate Flag

The Confederate Flag

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew Jackson Smith. This fort was captured, March 14th, 1864, by the Federal forces under General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Vicksburg on March 10th, landed at Summerville, La., on the 13th, and marched to Bayou Glace, where General Scurri's Confederate brigade had been encamped, which fled on the approach of the transports, leaving considerable camp equipage and commissary stores. General Smith pushed forward to Yellow Bayou, where strong fortifications had been erected; but the Confederates again fled. As he came up the enemy was pressed, and some skirmishing occurred, resulting in the capture of several prisoners and a small wagon train. At daylight the entire command started for Fort de Russy, twenty-eight miles distant, hotly pursued by General Dick Taylor, who hoped to save the fort; but Smith had the lead, and at four o'clock in the afternoon the Third and Ninth Indiana Batteries opened on the fort, which replied vigorously with three of its heaviest guns. The cannonade continued an hour, when General Smith ordered the First and Second illinois Regiments, Sixteenth Corps, under General Mower, to charge the enemy's rifle pits and storm the fort. The Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Nineteenth Indiana and Twenty-fourth Missouri Regiments charged over deep ditches and a thick abatis in the face of a galling fire, and within twenty minutes after the order was given the [African American] sergeant of the Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteers planted the American flag upon the enemy's works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort de Russy

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew…

"Flag of the Dutch West India Company. When the rights of the company ceased, a new and more powerful company was forced in Holland in 1621, called the West India Company, with full control of New Netherland. It was a trading company like the others, but it was intended also to dispute the Spanish power in America. The Dutch captains, like the English, found a profitable business in capturing Spanish vessels. The West India Company encouraged people to settle on its lands; it explored the North River and the South River, now known as the Delaware; and villages grew up about Fort Orange, and at New Amsterdam, as the Dutch called the settlement on Manhattan Island."—Scudder, 1897

Dutch West India Flag

"Flag of the Dutch West India Company. When the rights of the company ceased, a new and more powerful…

An iconic symbol of the United States: the bald eagle with olive branches and arrows.

Eagle

An iconic symbol of the United States: the bald eagle with olive branches and arrows.

An ensign or colors; a banner; a standard.

Flag

An ensign or colors; a banner; a standard.

The Flag of St. George is a flag of Great Britain. It shows the red cross of St. George on a white field, and survives only as a flag of command in the royal navy.

Flag of St. George

The Flag of St. George is a flag of Great Britain. It shows the red cross of St. George on a white field,…

In heraldry, an ordinary in the form of St. Andrew's cross, formed by two bends, dexter and sinister, crossing each other.

Saltire Flag

In heraldry, an ordinary in the form of St. Andrew's cross, formed by two bends, dexter and sinister,…

The Gonfanon is a flag of Great Britain.

Gonfanon

The Gonfanon is a flag of Great Britain.

"View of the front of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

Hessian Flag

"View of the front of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

"View of the back of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

Hessian Flag

"View of the back of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

Horsemen, Three Abreast, with Banners, from the engraving 'The Triumphal Procession' by Hans Burgkmair.

Horsemen, Three Abreast, with Banners

Horsemen, Three Abreast, with Banners, from the engraving 'The Triumphal Procession' by Hans Burgkmair.

The inauguration of President William McKinley led by the Black Horse Cavalry down Pennsylvania Avenue.

Inauguration of William McKinley

The inauguration of President William McKinley led by the Black Horse Cavalry down Pennsylvania Avenue.

Iris is a genus of between 200-300 species of flowering plants with showy flowers. It takes its name from the Greek word for a rainbow, referring to the wide variety of flower colors found among the many species. As well as being the scientific name, iris is also very widely used as a common name; for one thing, it refers to all Iris species, but some plants called thus belong to closely related genera. In North America, a common name for irises is flags, while the subgenus Scorpiris is widely known as junos, particularly in horticulture.

Iris

Iris is a genus of between 200-300 species of flowering plants with showy flowers. It takes its name…

"Flag of Morgan's Rifle Corps."—Lossing, 1851

Morgan's Flag

"Flag of Morgan's Rifle Corps."—Lossing, 1851

The secessionists tore up the railroad but the men of the eighth Massachusetts knew how to build railroads. Together with the New York Seventh Regiment, they began to spike down the rails and relaid the rails and made their way to Washington.

New York Seventh Regiment Marching Down Broadway

The secessionists tore up the railroad but the men of the eighth Massachusetts knew how to build railroads.…

The Pennon is a flag of Great Britain.

Pennon

The Pennon is a flag of Great Britain.

The Pennoncel is a flag of Great Britain.

Pennoncel

The Pennoncel is a flag of Great Britain.

"PENNONS. Small flags borne at the end of a lance of an esquire or gentleman bearing his paternal arms. The end of the pennon was cut off upon the person being created a knight banneret." -Hall, 1862

Pennons

"PENNONS. Small flags borne at the end of a lance of an esquire or gentleman bearing his paternal arms.…

The Royal Standard is a flag of Great Britain.

Royal Standard

The Royal Standard is a flag of Great Britain.

"Battle of Secessionville, James Island, S. C.- bayonet charge of Federal troops, commanded by General Stevens, upon the Confederate batteries on James Island, June 16th, 1862. Our sketch represents the desperate bayonet charge of the Federal troops which drove back the Confederates; but the Federals were so exhausted with their victory that the reconnoissance for the next day was postponed and some heavy guns having arrived, it was proposed to put them in battery in advance of General Steven's camp and try their effect upon the Confederate fort before renewing the project of an assault. The battery produced no effect upon the Confederate fort; and as its shells and shot commanded the Federal position and rendered its camp insecure, it became necessary to recur again to the old plan of the reconnoissance, and to attempt to reduce it by assault. The Federals were met by a murderous fire of grape and canister. Two regiments only reached the front, much cut up- the Eighth Michigan and the Seventy-ninth New York "Highlanders." The Twenty-eighth Massachusetts broke and scattered, while the Forty-sixth New York did little better. The first two drove the gunners from their guns; some mounted the parapet, and some even penetrated the work; but the other regiments, there being two besides those named, not rushing up to their support, they were obliged to retire after having really held it for nearly twenty minutes." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Secessionville

"Battle of Secessionville, James Island, S. C.- bayonet charge of Federal troops, commanded by General…

The Union Flag is the national flag of Great Britain. It is more properly called the 'Great Union', established by royal proclamation of April 12, 1606. It was formed by a combination of the crosses of St. George and St. Andrew; at the union with Ireland in 1801, the cross of St. Patrick was added. It is essentially the military flag of England. It is flown as the war jack on the jackstaff of English warships.

Union (National) Flag of Great Britain

The Union Flag is the national flag of Great Britain. It is more properly called the 'Great Union',…

The Union Flag after the Union of Ireland and Great Britain, and the addition of the cross of St. Patrick.

Union Flag: Crosses of St. George, St. Andrew, and St Patrick

The Union Flag after the Union of Ireland and Great Britain, and the addition of the cross of St. Patrick.

"The Act of Union with Scotland (1707) required that England and Scotland should have one flag made of the crosses of St. George and St. Andrew combined. After the union with Ireland (1801) the cross of St. Patrick was incorporated in the flag. The name 'Jack' comes from the French Jacques, referries to James I, the first sovereign of Great Britain."—Webster, 1920

The Union Jack

"The Act of Union with Scotland (1707) required that England and Scotland should have one flag made…

This capital letter W is decorated with flags and floral vines.

Capital W with Flags

This capital letter W is decorated with flags and floral vines.

The White Ensign is a flag of Great Britain. It is the peculiar flag of the royal navy.

White Ensign

The White Ensign is a flag of Great Britain. It is the peculiar flag of the royal navy.