"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: "On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"General Asboth and staff at the Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., March 6th-8th, 1862. The gallantry displayed by General Asboth in the victory of Pea Ridge gives great interest to the spirited sketch of himself and staff which we present to our readers. Among the officers in the sketch were Acting Brigadier General Albert, Brigade Quartermaster McKay, the young commander of the Fremont Hussars, Major George E. Waring, Jr., from New York city, formerly major of the Garibaldi Guards, and the general's aids-de-camp, Gillen and Kroll, etc. Among General Asboth's most constant attendants was his favorite dog, York, a splendid speciment of the St. Bernard species." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"General Asboth and staff at the Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., March 6th-8th, 1862. The gallantry displayed…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…