This illustration shows a tree that has had its branches grafted.

Branch-grafted Tree

This illustration shows a tree that has had its branches grafted.

This illustration shows a tree that has been both branch-budded and grafted. Buds inserted in August. Bud on A lived. Buds on B, B, and B died, and these branches were grafted the following spring.

Bud and Graft

This illustration shows a tree that has been both branch-budded and grafted. Buds inserted in August.…

A small twig, used for grafting in agriculture.

Cion

A small twig, used for grafting in agriculture.

This illustration shows a method of cleft grafting. Part A shows the scion, B, the scions inserted in the cleft, C, the stub and scions waxed.

Cleft Grafting

This illustration shows a method of cleft grafting. Part A shows the scion, B, the scions inserted in…

"Cleft-grafting is another method in common use. The stock a is cleft down from the horizontal cut d, and the scion, when cut to a thin wedge form, as shown at c and e, is inserted into the cleft; the whole is then bound up and clayed as in the former case. This is not so goood a plan as wip-grafting; it is improved by sloping the stock on one side to the size of the graft." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Cleft-Grafting

"Cleft-grafting is another method in common use. The stock a is cleft down from the horizontal cut d,…

"Crown-grafting is preferable to cleft-grafting, inasmuch as it leaves no open spaces in the wood. The stock b is cut off horizontally or nearly so, and a slit is then cut in the bark f, f, a wedge-shaped piece of ivory being inserted to raise the bark; the scion is then cut to the same wedge-shaped form g, h, and inserted in the space opened for it between the albumen and the bark, after which it is tied down and clayed over in the manner already described." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown-Grafting

"Crown-grafting is preferable to cleft-grafting, inasmuch as it leaves no open spaces in the wood. The…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. All grafts inserted outside should be protected, and kept from moving by a stake, which should reach nearly to the top.

Mode of Supporting the Graft

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. Picture A shows the mode of tying the graft adopted with many fruit trees. Picture B shows the work completed by the application of clay.

Mode of Tying and Claying Graft

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Cions properly inserter for a top-graft.

Top-graft

Cions properly inserter for a top-graft.

A top-graft, completed.

Top-graft

A top-graft, completed.

(a) the two branches to be joined; (b) a tounge cut in each; (c) how fitted together; (d) method of wrapping

Grafting

(a) the two branches to be joined; (b) a tounge cut in each; (c) how fitted together; (d) method of…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In grafting by approach the scion intended for inarching must either be a movable pot plant that may be taken to any place desired, or one planted in close proximity to the stock.

Grafting by Approach

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

(a) cut several scions, each having a few buds, making the ends in a wedge shape; (b) insert scions into a split trunk; (c) cover with grafting wax to prevent drying out

Cleft Grafting

(a) cut several scions, each having a few buds, making the ends in a wedge shape; (b) insert scions…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In cleft grafting the stock has to be split open by a chisel or other instrument. The scion is cut wedge shaped and fitted in the cleft so that the inner barks meet each other.

Cleft Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In the form of cleft grafting picture the stock and scion are the same size.

Cleft Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In crown or rind grafting one or more scions may be inserted, according to the size of the stem intended for their reception.

Crown or Rind Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

A cion (smooth, one year old lenth of twig cut into a sex inch length) and root pictured, about to be grafted together.

Root grafting

A cion (smooth, one year old lenth of twig cut into a sex inch length) and root pictured, about to be…

Cion and root united during the grafting process.

Root grafting

Cion and root united during the grafting process.

The grafting process complete (reduced in size)

Roof grafting

The grafting process complete (reduced in size)

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In root grafting good roots should be secured as stocks when the plants bearing them are in a dormant state. Dahlias are good plants for root grafting.

Root Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In saddle grafting the stock and scion must be nearly equal in thickness.

Saddle Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. Side grafting is used to insert scions without cutting away the head of the stock.

Side Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. In wedge grafting the positions of parts are reversed; the scion is wedge shaped and fitted into an incision of similar shape and size cut in the stock.

Wedge Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to grow together. Whip grafting is considered the best method of grafting.

Whip or Tongue Grafting

Grafting is placing two cut surfaces of one or different plants under conditions which cause them to…

Grafting is the process of adding nodes to the inferred decision trees to improve the predicative accuracy. Decision tree is a graphical model that is used as a support tool for decision process.

Grafting Machine

Grafting is the process of adding nodes to the inferred decision trees to improve the predicative accuracy.…

Delicate species of mammillaria thrive when grafted on some cereus stock.

Graft of Mammillaria on Cereus Stock

Delicate species of mammillaria thrive when grafted on some cereus stock.

"Fahlias and paeonies may be grafted by inserting young shoots into the neck of one of the fleshy roots of each kind respectively the best method of doing so being to cut a triangular section near the upper end of the root, just large enough to admit the young shoot when slightly pared away in two sides to give it a similar form." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Root-Grafting

"Fahlias and paeonies may be grafted by inserting young shoots into the neck of one of the fleshy roots…

"In the case of large woody plants thus worked the grafted roots, after the operation is completed, are planted in nursery beds, so that the upper buds only are exposed to the atmosphere, as shown at c in the figure." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Root-Grafting

"In the case of large woody plants thus worked the grafted roots, after the operation is completed,…

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding. The operator should be provided with a budding-knife in which the cutting edge of the blade is rounded off at the point, and which has a thin ivory or bone handle, for raising the bark of the stock. A horizonal incision is made in the bark quite down to the wood, and from this a perpendicular slit is drawn downwards to the extent of perhaps an inch, so that the slit has a resemblance to the letter T, as at a. A bud is then cut by a clean incision from the tree intended to be propagated, having a portion of the wood attached to it, and so that the whole may be an inch and a half long, as at d." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Shield-Budding

"The simplest and most generally practised form of budding is that called Shield budding or T-budding.…

To graft two plants together using the tongue or whip grafting approach, you must first make a sloping cut in the rootstock with a 'tongue' pointing up. Next you must make a matching cut in the scion wood with a 'tongue' pointing downwards. Finally you join the two, ensuring maximum contact of the cambium layers. Bind with rafia or polythene tape and seal with grafting wax.

Tongue Grafting

To graft two plants together using the tongue or whip grafting approach, you must first make a sloping…

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed off by an oblique transverse cut as shown at a, a slice is then pared off the side as at b, and on the face of this a tongue or notch is made, the cut being in a downward direction; the scion c is pared off in a similar way by a single clean sharp cut, and this is notched or tongued in the opposite direction as the figure indicates, the two are then fitted together as shown at d, so that the inner bark of each may come in contact at least on one side, and then tied round with damp soft bast as at c; next some grafting clay is taken on the forefinger and pushed down on each side so as to fill out the space between the top of the stock and the graft, and a portion is also rubbed over the ligatures on the side where the graft is placed." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Whip-Grafting

"Whip-grafting or tongue-grafting is the most usual mode of performing the operation. The stock is headed…