Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702 until her death in 1714.

Queen Anne of England

Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702 until her death in 1714.

The Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland. She was born on February 6, 1665 and died on August 1, 1714.

Queen Anne of England

The Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland. She was born on February 6, 1665 and died on August 1, 1714.

"Bagpipe, a musical wind-instrument of very great antiquity, having been used among the ancient Greeks, and being a favorite instrument over Europe generally in the fifteenth century." -Vaughan, 1906

Highland Bagpipe

"Bagpipe, a musical wind-instrument of very great antiquity, having been used among the ancient Greeks,…

This brooch is found in Ireland.

Brooch

This brooch is found in Ireland.

This brooch is found in Ireland.

Brooch

This brooch is found in Ireland.

This brooch is found in Ireland.

Brooch

This brooch is found in Ireland.

This brooch is found in Ireland.

Brooch

This brooch is found in Ireland.

The Royal Tara brooch is made out of bronze with niello (black metallic alloy) and gems. It was found in Drogheda, Ireland.

Royal Tara Brooch

The Royal Tara brooch is made out of bronze with niello (black metallic alloy) and gems. It was found…

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles I

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Charles II

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

Charles II

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

This wine cooler is richly designed on all sides. It has bacchanalian (God of festivities) busts on all corners and a figure of Hibernia (classic Latin name for Ireland) on the very top.

Wine Cooler

This wine cooler is richly designed on all sides. It has bacchanalian (God of festivities) busts on…

"Crannoge, the name given in Ireland and in Scotland to the fortified islands in lakes which were in common use as dwelling-places and places of refuge among the Celtic inhavitants. The etymology of the word is uncertain, but it is believed to refer to the timber which was employed either in the fortification of the island, or in the construction of the houses which were placed upon it." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crannoge

"Crannoge, the name given in Ireland and in Scotland to the fortified islands in lakes which were in…

This monumental cross was made in Ireland. It depicts scenes from the Gospel as described in the Old Testament. These scenes are "Moses and the Brazen Serpent", "The Translation of Elijah", "Noah entering the Arc", "Abel's Sacrifice". The busts on the lower end of the cross are prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel.

Monumental Cross

This monumental cross was made in Ireland. It depicts scenes from the Gospel as described in the Old…

The Dangan Castle.

Dangan

The Dangan Castle.

Davitt was an Irish campaigner and politician who was a nationalist. He founded the National Land League.

Michael Davitt

Davitt was an Irish campaigner and politician who was a nationalist. He founded the National Land League.

"Bank of Ireland, Dublin." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Dublin Bank

"Bank of Ireland, Dublin." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The gap of Dunloe.

Dunloe

The gap of Dunloe.

Edward VI (12 October 1537 - 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547 and was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine. The son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, Edward was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first Protestant ruler. During Edward’s reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council, because he never reached maturity. The Council was led from 1547 to 1549 by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, and from 1550 to 1553 by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick, who in 1551 became 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Edward VI of England and Ireland

Edward VI (12 October 1537 - 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547 and…

The King of Great Britain and Ireland from August 1, 1714 until he died on June 11, 1727.

George I, King of England

The King of Great Britain and Ireland from August 1, 1714 until he died on June 11, 1727.

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 - 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until his death. This is the usual appearance of George III.

Usual Appearance of George III. About 1776 (From a sketch by Gear.)

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 - 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King…

The King of Great Britain and King of Ireland until their union in 1801. He continued his reign over the two countries until his death in 1820.

George III

The King of Great Britain and King of Ireland until their union in 1801. He continued his reign over…

The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. It is located on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about two miles (3 km) north of the town of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986, and a National Nature Reserve in 1987 by the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the Giant's Causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the cliff foot and disappear under the sea. Most of the columns are hexagonal, although there are also some with four, five, seven and eight sides. The tallest are about 12 meters (36 ft) high, and the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 meters thick in places.

Giant's Causeway

The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient…

"Obverse. Gun-money. Half-crown, 1689. GUN-MONEY. Money of the coinage issued by James II in Ireland when he attempted to recover his kingdom in 1689 and 1690." -Whitney, 1911

Obverse Side of Gun Money

"Obverse. Gun-money. Half-crown, 1689. GUN-MONEY. Money of the coinage issued by James II in Ireland…

"Reverse. Gun-money. Half-crown, 1689. GUN-MONEY. Money of the coinage issued by James II in Ireland when he attempted to recover his kingdom in 1689 and 1690." -Whitney, 1911

Reverse Side of Gun Money

"Reverse. Gun-money. Half-crown, 1689. GUN-MONEY. Money of the coinage issued by James II in Ireland…

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

The Ruins of Iona

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

The Bank of Ireland.

Bank of Ireland

The Bank of Ireland.

Ireland, St. Patrick's Banner. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland.

Ireland, St. Patrick's Banner

Ireland, St. Patrick's Banner. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland.

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

James II

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

(1838-1903) Irish historian and philosopher

William E. H. Lecky

(1838-1903) Irish historian and philosopher

Marmorization of chalk beds by basalt. Island of Rathlin on coast of Antrim, Ireland.

Marmorization of Chalk Beds

Marmorization of chalk beds by basalt. Island of Rathlin on coast of Antrim, Ireland.

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 19 July 1553 until her death. The fourth crowned monarch of the Tudor dynasty, she is remembered for restoring England to Roman Catholicism after succeeding her short-lived half brother, Edward VI, to the English throne. In the process, she had almost 300 religious dissenters burned at the stake in the Marian Persecutions, earning her the sobriquet of "Bloody Mary". Her re-establishment of Roman Catholicism was reversed by her successor and half-sister, Elizabeth I.

Mary I of England

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 19…

(1830- ) Irish historian and novelist

Justin McCarthy

(1830- ) Irish historian and novelist

A memorial cross found in Monasterboice, Ireland.

Monasterboice

A memorial cross found in Monasterboice, Ireland.

(1779-1852) Irish poet

Thomas Moore

(1779-1852) Irish poet

"Moore, Thomas, the national poet of Ireland, was born in 1799 in Dublin, where his father was a grocer; died near Devizes in 1852. From Trinity College, Dublin, he passed in 1799 to the Middle Temple in London, nominally to study law; but he almost immediately formed a connection with the fashionable and literary society of which he was so long an ornament, and in 1800 he was permitted to dedicate his Translation of the Odes of anacreon to the Prince of Wales." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Thomas Moore

"Moore, Thomas, the national poet of Ireland, was born in 1799 in Dublin, where his father was a grocer;…

The Nelson Monument, Sackille Street, Dublin.

Nelson

The Nelson Monument, Sackille Street, Dublin.

The monument to Daniel O'Donnell.

O'Donnell

The monument to Daniel O'Donnell.

An Irish political leader

Charles Stewart Parnell

An Irish political leader

The founder and leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party.

Charles Stewart Parnell

The founder and leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party.

Mother of Charles Stewart Parnell and is called an "American lady." She is the daughter of Commodore Stewart, of the United States navy. She was a supporter of the liberty of Ireland and was an active worker in the Irish National League.

Mrs. Parnell

Mother of Charles Stewart Parnell and is called an "American lady." She is the daughter of Commodore…

The waterfall, Phoula-phouca.

Phoula-Phouca

The waterfall, Phoula-phouca.

Poor Irish family.

Poor family

Poor Irish family.

A potato.

Potato

A potato.

"A Round Tower, located in Devenish, Ireland." — Chambers, 1881

Round Tower

"A Round Tower, located in Devenish, Ireland." — Chambers, 1881

"The national emblem of Ireland, is a plant with a leaf formed from three leaflets. It is thought to be the wood-sorrel, a native of Ireland, by some, and by others the name is given to the bird's-foot trefoil." — Beach, 1900

Shamrock

"The national emblem of Ireland, is a plant with a leaf formed from three leaflets. It is thought to…

Prehistoric Irish spearheads, made of bronze.

Prehistoric Irish spearheads

Prehistoric Irish spearheads, made of bronze.

"St. Patrick appears to have been a native of Boulogne, in France, and to have been born about the year 387, A.D. In his sixteenth year, he was made captive in a marauding expedition, conducted by Nial of the Nine Hostages." — Goodrich, 1844

St. Patrick

"St. Patrick appears to have been a native of Boulogne, in France, and to have been born about the year…

"St. Patrick, or Patricius, is the apostle or patron saint of Ireland; said to have been born near the site of Kilpatrick, Scotland. His zeal prompted him to cross the channel for the conversion of the pagan Irish. His arrival in Ireland took place probably between 440-460. His endeavors were crowned with great success, and he established there a number of schools and monasteries. He died at an advanced age."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Badge of the Order of St. Patrick

"St. Patrick, or Patricius, is the apostle or patron saint of Ireland; said to have been born near the…

Section of volcanic plug (basalt) in chalk. Coast of Antrim, Ireland.

Volcanic Plug

Section of volcanic plug (basalt) in chalk. Coast of Antrim, Ireland.

Walker's Pillar in Londonderry.

Walker's Pillar

Walker's Pillar in Londonderry.