Offering incense at the altar of incense.

Altar of Incense

Offering incense at the altar of incense.

"According to the ancient authorities, it was made of bronze, and its form was oval, but with the two sides receding inward with an even curvature, and so as to make it broader at the ends than in the middle. The original ancile was said to have fallen from the skies in the time of Numa. To secure its preservation, Numa ordered eleven other shields to be made exactly like it. These twelve <em>ancilia</em> were kept in the temple of Mars Gradivus, and were taken from it only once a year, on the kalends of March. The feast of the god was then observed during several days; when the Salii, or priests of Mars, twelve in number, carried the sacred shields about the city, singing songs in praise of Mars, Numa, and Mamurius Veturius, who made the eleven. They at the same time performed a dance, in which they struck the shield with rods, so as to keep time with their voices and with the movements of the dance." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Ancilia

"According to the ancient authorities, it was made of bronze, and its form was oval, but with the two…

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. During the latter's reign, Andrewes served as successively as Bishop of Chichester, Ely and Winchester; and oversaw the translation of the Authorized Version (or King James Version) of the Bible. In the Church of England he is commemorated on 25 September with a Lesser Festival.

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions…

"Brahman Priest." &mdash; Quackenbos, 1882

Brahman

"Brahman Priest." — Quackenbos, 1882

"Buddhist Priest." &mdash; Quackenbos, 1882

Buddhist

"Buddhist Priest." — Quackenbos, 1882

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith. He is most famous for his Fifteen Sermons Preached at the Rolls Chapel (1726) and Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed (1736).

Bishop Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and…

When Henry VIII became king in 1509, Wolsey's affairs prospered. He became Canon of Windsor, Berkshire in 1511, the same year in which he became a member of the Privy Council. His political star was in the ascendant, and he soon became the controlling figure in all matters of state. 1514, he was made Bishop of Lincoln, and then Archbishop of York.

Cardinal Wolsey Served by Noblemen

When Henry VIII became king in 1509, Wolsey's affairs prospered. He became Canon of Windsor, Berkshire…

Hidalgo Castello was a Mexican Roman Catholic priest and revolutionary rebel leader. He is regarded by most Mexican people as the "Father of the Country" and was founder of the Mexican War of Independence movement which fought for independence from Spain in the early 19th century.

Hidalgo Castello

Hidalgo Castello was a Mexican Roman Catholic priest and revolutionary rebel leader. He is regarded…

Irish and Scottish missionaries were instrumental in the spread of Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England and the Frankish Empire during the 6th and 7th centuries.

Celtic Missionaries Starting on a Voyage

Irish and Scottish missionaries were instrumental in the spread of Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England…

Two priests wearing the garmet.

Chasuble

Two priests wearing the garmet.

An illustration of a Native American chief with a priest.

Chief & Priest

An illustration of a Native American chief with a priest.

Morgan Dix (born November 1, 1827 in New York City; died April 29, 1908) was an American priest, "divine" (a theologian) and religious author. The son of John A. Dix and Catherine Morgan, he was educated at Columbia College and the General Theological Seminary. For almost fifty-three years, he was identified with Trinity Church, New York, of which he became assistant minister in 1855 and rector in 1862. As well as being a very active churchman, Dix also wrote widely about the practice of Christianity. Among his major works are Commentaries on Romans and on Galatians and Colossians; The Calling of a Christian Woman; The Seven Deadly Sins; The Sacramental System; and Lectures on the First Prayer-Book of Edward VI.

Morgan Dix

Morgan Dix (born November 1, 1827 in New York City; died April 29, 1908) was an American priest, "divine"…

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 &ndash; 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the posts of Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1570 Grindal became Archbishop of York, where Puritans were few and coercion would be required mainly for Roman Catholics. His first letter from Cawood to Cecil told that he had not been well received, that the gentry were not "well-affected to godly religion and among the common people many superstitious practices remained."

Archbishop Edmund Grindal

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the…

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married Amelia Shipley, daughter of the Dean of St Asaph. He was made prebendary of St Asaph in 1812, appointed Bampton lecturer for 1815, preacher at Lincoln's Inn in 1822, and Bishop of Calcutta in January 1823. Before sailing for India he received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford. In India, Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably - not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East. He toured the country, consecrating churches, founding schools and discharging other Christian duties. Heber was a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy. His fame rests mainly on his hymns.

Bishop Reginald Heber

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married…

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 &ndash; March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went to college with the intention of becoming a priest, but his scholarship attracted the attention of King James I. Herbert served in parliament for two years. In 1630, in his late thirties he gave up his secular ambitions and took holy orders in the Church of England, spending the rest of his life as a rector of the little parish of St. Andrew Bemerton, near Salisbury.

George Herbert's Rector House, Bemerton

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 – March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went…

The Bishop of Sherwood.

Proud Bishop of Hereford

The Bishop of Sherwood.

A Jewish high priest.  His main job was to look over the sanctuary and all that belonged to the sacred service.  His job was also hereditary, meaning it was passed down from father to son.

High Priest

A Jewish high priest. His main job was to look over the sanctuary and all that belonged to the sacred…

Also known as Kohen Gadol or Kohen ha-Gadol. The High Priest of Israel could officiate sacrifices and enter the Holy of Holies on Yom Kippur.

High Priest of Israel

Also known as Kohen Gadol or Kohen ha-Gadol. The High Priest of Israel could officiate sacrifices and…

"And it came to pass on the seventh day, that they rose early at the dawning of the day, and compassed the city after the same manner seven times: only on the day they compassed the city seven times. And it came to pass at the seventh time, when the priests blew the trumpets, Joshua said unto the people, Shout; for Jehovah hath given you the city. And the city shall be devoted, even it and all that is therein, to Jehovah: only Rahab the harlot shall live, she and all that are with her in the house, because she hid the messengers that we sent. But as for you, only keep yourselves from the devoted thing, lest when ye have devoted it, ye take of the devoted thing; so would ye make the camp of Israel accursed, and trouble it. But all the silver, and gold, and vessels of brass and iron, are holy unto Jehovah: they shall come into the treasury of Jehovah. So the people shouted, and the priests blew the trumpets; and it came to pass, when the people heard the sound of the trumpet, that the people shouted with a great shout, and the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they took the city." Joshua 6:15-20 ASV
<p>Illustration of the walls of Jericho falling as the Israelites surround the city. The ark of the covenant and priests blowing trumpets are seen on the left side of the picture.

Falling of the Walls of Jericho

"And it came to pass on the seventh day, that they rose early at the dawning of the day, and compassed…

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 &ndash; September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On 20 September 1871 he was murdered on the island of Nukapu in the Solomon Islands, where he had landed alone. Natives killed him as revenge against the abduction of some natives by white men months earlier. His death became a cause celebre in England and increased interest both in missionary work and in improvement of the working conditions in Melanesia. His life is celebrated in the Church of England as a saintly one.

Bishop Patteson's House, Norfolk Island

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr.…

An illustration of a priest greeting small children.

Priest

An illustration of a priest greeting small children.

"Statue of an Assyrian Priest." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Assyrian priest

"Statue of an Assyrian Priest." —D'Anvers, 1895

An illustration of a Spanish priest.

Spanish Priest

An illustration of a Spanish priest.

A pulpit (from Latin pulpitum "scaffold", "platform", "stage") is a small elevated platform from which a member of the clergy delivers a sermon in a house of worship.

Pulpit

A pulpit (from Latin pulpitum "scaffold", "platform", "stage") is a small elevated platform from which…

Reynard the Fox tricking Kyward the hare into believing he could teach him how to be a good priest. But the fox wanted to eat the hare until Panther caught him.

Reynard the Fox: Tricking the Hare

Reynard the Fox tricking Kyward the hare into believing he could teach him how to be a good priest.…

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

An Italian Dominican priest of Florence, Italy. He is best known for his acts of book burning.

Savonarola

An Italian Dominican priest of Florence, Italy. He is best known for his acts of book burning.

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar used by priests and deacons.

Sedilia

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar…

Jeremy Taylor (1613 &ndash; 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame as an author during The Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. He is sometimes known as the "Shakespeare of Divines" for his poetic style of expression and was often presented as a model of prose writing. He was under the patronage of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury. He went on to become chaplain in ordinary to King Charles I as a result of Laud's sponsorship. This made him politically suspect when Laud was tried for treason and executed in 1645 by the Puritan Parliament during the English Civil War. After the Parliamentary victory over the King, he was briefly imprisoned several times.

Bishop Jeremy Taylor

Jeremy Taylor (1613 – 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame…

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. &ndash; July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA (1789; 1795&ndash;1836), the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania (1787&ndash;1836), and the second United States Senate Chaplain (appointed December 9, 1790).

William White

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth…

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen. Whitgift's theological views were often controversial.

Archbishop John Whitgift

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted…

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697 and 1755. When he came to the Isle of Man, he found the buildings of the diocese in a ruinous condition. The building of new churches was one of his first acts, and he eventually rebuilt most of the churches of the diocese along with establishing public libraries. Wilson worked to restore ecclesiastical discipline on the island, although he clashed with civil authorities partly because of the reduction of revenue from Wilson mitigating fines in the spiritual court.

Bishop Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697…

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 &ndash; November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, was an English statesman and a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. Wolsey's affairs prospered and by 1514 he had become the controlling figure in all matters of state and extremely powerful within the Church. The highest political position he attained was Lord Chancellor, the King's chief advisor, enjoying great freedom and often depicted as an alter rex (other king). Within the Church he became archbishop of York, the second most important see in England, and then was made a cardinal in 1515, giving him precedence over even the Archbishop of Canterbury. His main legacy is from his interest in architecture, in particular his old home of Hampton Court Palace, which stands today.

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich,…