"The Parting of Achilles and Briseis. (Supposed to be from a Greek Painting.)" —D'Anvers, 1895

The Parting of Achilles and Briseis

"The Parting of Achilles and Briseis. (Supposed to be from a Greek Painting.)" —D'Anvers, 1895

The Siege of Alicant, Spain in 1709. Caption bellow illustration: "The mine at last blew up; the rock opened and shut; the whole mountain felt convulsion, the governor and field officers, with their company, ten guns, and two mortars, were buried in the Abyss."

The Siege of Alicant

The Siege of Alicant, Spain in 1709. Caption bellow illustration: "The mine at last blew up; the rock…

An American Rifleman from 1780.

American Rifleman

An American Rifleman from 1780.

Capture of Major Andre

Major Andre

Capture of Major Andre

"In the thirteenth year of the reign of Nabuchodonosor, the two and twentieth day of the first month, the word was given out in the house of Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians, that he would revenge himself. And he called all the ancients, and all the governors, and his officers of war, and communicated to them the secret of his counsel: And he said that his thoughts were to bring all the earth under his empire. And when this saying pleased them all, Nabuchodonosor, the king, called Holofernes the general of his armies, And said to him: Go out against all the kingdoms of the west, and against them especially that despised my commandment. Thy eye shall not spare any kingdom, and all the strong cities thou shalt bring under my yoke. Then Holofernes called the captains and officers of the power of the Assyrians: and he mustered men for the expedition, as the king commanded him, a hundred and twenty thousand fighting men on foot, and twelve thousand archers, horsemen." Judith 2:2-7 DRA
<p>Illustration of the vast armies of Nebuchadnezzar.

Army of King Nebuchadnezzar

"In the thirteenth year of the reign of Nabuchodonosor, the two and twentieth day of the first month,…

A poster of ancient Babylonia: Chaldea, Assyria, Persia, soldiers, religion, writing, and structures.

Babylonia Poster

A poster of ancient Babylonia: Chaldea, Assyria, Persia, soldiers, religion, writing, and structures.

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering their mules in the Rappahannock. General Pleasonton's cavalry was attended by a very efficient forage brigade, consisting of mules and [African American] riders. Our sketch represents their drivers taking them to water at the river. The hard work these animals will endure is something wonderful, and justifies the high estimation in which they are held in the army." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage train

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering…

Column of troops with wagons marching through the woods.

Marching to the Battlefield - Ball's Bluff

Column of troops with wagons marching through the woods.

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, near the Relay House, in 1861. The Relay House was a small railroad station about seven miles from Baltimore, on the Northern Central Railroad. It was of small population and trade, but its position elevated it into considerable importance. Immediately after the troubles in Baltimore this position was seized upon, and General Butler made it his headquarters, and by so doing not only held the control of the railrod to Harper's Ferry and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Patapsco River, but threatened the city of Baltimore with a strong military force. The Relay House was romantically situated in a country of exquisite natural beauty. Our sketch shows the battery stationed to command the viaduct, with the Relay House in the distance." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bouquet Battery

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,…

A modern battle scene

Battle

A modern battle scene

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

Duryea's Zouaves at Big Bethel Brining Off Grebel's Body

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bird's Point

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."—…

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana Zouaves in their bivouac at Cumberland, Maryland. Great interest was attached to this regiment after its brilliant attack at Romney; and as we have presented them in the midst of the action, we have pleasure in showing them to our readers roughing it in their distant camps. The members of this regiment were magnificent specimens of the physical man, and under the Colonel Wallace and his officers, who marched on foot, leading their men, accomplished feats of endurance and daring that had been considered impossible in warfare.

Bivouac of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana…

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates. On Sunday, September 14th, 1862, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass, on the line of the Federal road leading from Frederick City to Hagerstown and the fords of the Upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one, and strongly guarded, but was carried after a severe action by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Blue Ridge Pass

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates.…

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road to Yorktown." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Howard's Bridge and Mill

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road…

An illustration of British soldiers relaxing outdoors near trees.

British Soldiers

An illustration of British soldiers relaxing outdoors near trees.

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

An illustration of a Calvary charging.

Calvary Charge

An illustration of a Calvary charging.

Washington taking command of the army at Cambridge.

Cambridge

Washington taking command of the army at Cambridge.

An illustration of soldiers loading a cannon.

Cannon & Soldiers

An illustration of soldiers loading a cannon.

"Reception of Brigadier General Corcoran by Mayor Opdyke and the citizens of New York, at Castle Garden, August 22nd, 1862. Mayor Opdyke escorting the general to his carriage. The 22nd of August, 1862, will be a memorable day for our Irish citizens, for on that day the people of New York turned out to give a hearty welcome to- not a victorious soldier, but to the true and patient man who had for thirteen months endured the worst of captivities to a brave soldier, compulsory inaction, when he knows his gallant companions are fighting for a great cause almost within cannon shot of his dungeon. And the reception was not given alone to the released general, but to everyone of those patient thousands who have suffered an equally cruel ordeal, although their names are unwept, unhonored and unsung. In this view, the oration which greeted the brave Corcoran was a noble and remarkabe one, and worthy of the great city that gave it."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Castle Garden

"Reception of Brigadier General Corcoran by Mayor Opdyke and the citizens of New York, at Castle Garden,…

Castle Thunder, one of the Confederate prisons known for its abominable conditions.

Castle Thunder, Richmond, VA, Where Union Prisoners Were Confined

Castle Thunder, one of the Confederate prisons known for its abominable conditions.

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen horses into virginia by the lower fords of the Potomac, Sunday, October 12th 1862." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Stuart's Cavalry

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen…

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by General Banks and the Confederate Army led by Generals Jackson, Ewell, Winder, etc.- final repulse of the Confederates. General Pope's report of the battle is as follows: "On Saturday, August 9th, 1862, the enemy advanced rapidly to Cedar Mountain, the sides of which they occupied in heavy force. General Banks was instructed to take up his position on the ground occupied by Crawford's brigade, of his command, which had been thrown out the day previous to observe the enemy's movements. He was directed not to advance beyond that point, and if attacked by the enemy to defend his position and send back timely notice. The artillery of the enemy was opened early in the afternoon, but he made no advance until nearly five o'clock, at which time a few skirmishers were thrown forward on each side under cover of the heavy wood in which his force was concealed. The enemy pushed forward a strong force in the rear of his skirmishers, and General Banks advanced to the attack. The engagement did not fairly open until after six o'clock, and for an hour and a half was furious and unceasing. I arrived personally on the field at 7 P.M., and found the action raging furiously. The infantry fire was incessant and severe. I found General Banks holding the position he took up early in the morning. His losses were heavy. Ricketts's division was immediately pushed forward and occupied the right of General Banks, the brigades of Crawford and Gordon being directed to change their position from the right and mass themselves in the centre. Before this change could be effected it was quite dark, though the artillery fire continued at short range without intermission. The artillery fire, at night, by the Second and Fifth Maine batteries in Ricketts's division of General McDowell's corps was most destructive, as was readily observable the next morning in the dead men and horses and broken gun carriages of the enemy's batteries which had been advanced against it. Our troops rested on their arms during the night in line of battle, the heavy shelling being kept up on both sides until midnight. At daylight the next morning the enemy fell back two miles from our front, and still higher up the mountain."" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by…

An illustration of two men standing in a chariot pulled by two small goats.

Men in Chariot Pulled by Goats

An illustration of two men standing in a chariot pulled by two small goats.

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler, detaching itself from General Slocum's division and rushing to the support of the General Kearny's division, which had been driven back, thus turning the fortunes of the day, June 30th, 1862, six o'clock p.m." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Charles City

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler,…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

An illustration of a parade of children in costumes.

Parade of Children in Costumes

An illustration of a parade of children in costumes.

Leiden Christi is a drawing that was printed by German artist Albrecht Pfister in 1470. It depicts Jesus being resurrected from his tomb holding a cross. Below him are two soldiers sleeping.

Leiden Christi

Leiden Christi is a drawing that was printed by German artist Albrecht Pfister in 1470. It depicts Jesus…

Soldiers in a company kitchen.

Company Kitchen

Soldiers in a company kitchen.

"Interior of the principal Confederate fortifications near New Berne, N. C., after their capture by the Federal forces under General Burnside, March 14th, 1862. In our previous parts we have given so complete a narrative of the New Berne Expedition that a very few words will suffice to explain our sketch. Fort Thompson was one of the forts situated on the Neuse to defend the city against a naval force. Of the appearance after its capture our artist said: 'Had the garrison been worthy of the fortification this place might have given our gunboats some trouble; but, after receiving a few of the well-directed shells sent by Commodore Rowan, the place was ours.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Fortifications

"Interior of the principal Confederate fortifications near New Berne, N. C., after their capture by…

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel Baker's Regiment, October 21st, 1861. Conrad's Ferry is situated on the Maryland side of the Upper Potomac, about five miles above Edward's Ferry. It was in possession of the Federal troops. It commands a view of Harrison's Island, the scene of so much disaster at the battle of Ball's Bluff, and is immediately opposite to Leesburg Heights, the town of Leesburg being about five miles from the Ferry, on the south side of the Potomac." —Leslie, 1896

Conrad's Ferry

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel…

A soldier in the Continental Army.

Continental Soldier

A soldier in the Continental Army.

"View of the encampment of the Convention Troops."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Convention Troops

"View of the encampment of the Convention Troops."—Lossing, 1851

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement. We illustrated the opening of this battle on page 159, and now add a sketch of the centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement, described by our correspondent, as follows: "General Melroy had the centre, and pressed steadily forward from the ground where he first took position, planting his guns each time nearer the enemy's batteries. His artillery delivered its fire with a precision truly remarkable. The ground where the enemy's guns were planted was furrowed with our shot and shell as with a plow, and where one battery stood I counted twelve dead horses. General Melroy's infantry deployed through the woods, taking advantage of a deep gully to cross a wheatfield, where they were exposed, and charged gallantly up the hill, where one of the opposing batteries was planted, cutting down the gunners with their fire. Had they been supported they would have captured a battery. They made the crest of the hill too hot to hold on the part of the enemy, and held their position until recalled." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement.…

A cyclops surrounded by soldiers.

The Cyclops

A cyclops surrounded by soldiers.

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

Dacian Stronghold

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

The Death of Poniatowski

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Beard, repelling the attack of Confederate troops in the vicinity of Doboy River, GA." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Doboy River

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of…

A cartoon drawing of soldiers entering a dark cave where a giant resides.

In Doubting Castle

A cartoon drawing of soldiers entering a dark cave where a giant resides.

Rioting in New York City after passage of an unpopular draft.

The Draft Riots in New York - The Battle in Second Avenue

Rioting in New York City after passage of an unpopular draft.

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's Ferry, on the night of October 23rd, 1861. Of the 1,900 Federals who crossed the river in the morning but a sad remnant reached the island and opposite shore on that awful night. Upward of 500 were taken prisoners; more than 100 were drowned; nearly the same number were killed on the field or shot in the retreat, and upward of 200 were wounded. We shrink from detailing all the incidents of horror which marked this most disastrous action and retreat. It was a fearful blunder from beginning to end. Our illustration represents the successful retreat to the Maryland shore on the night of Wednesday, October 23rd, by moonlight, during a high, cold windstorm." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Edward's ferry

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's…

Ambassadors arrive from the Emperor of Blefuscu, and sue for peace.

Emperor's court

Ambassadors arrive from the Emperor of Blefuscu, and sue for peace.

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages from home. It is only those who had relatives in camp that could tell the feverish anxiety of the troops to hear from those they had left at home. We need hardly describe a scene which so thoroughly explains itself. The name of Adams Express was a household one, both to the donor and receiver of good things sent to the absent soldier." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Adams Express

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages…

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday, July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Review of Federal Army

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday,…

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal Kitchen

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." — Frank Leslie,…

A cartoon image showing some soldiers on horses running to attack a castle.

The Fight

A cartoon image showing some soldiers on horses running to attack a castle.

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton Head, S. C., under Colonel Fessenden, U. S. A., June 25th, 1862. Our correspondent at Hilton Head wrote us: "I witnessed the parade entire, as well as the company drills in the manual of arms, etc., afterward, and I must acknowledge my complete surprise at the discipline and even vim evinced by the sable crowd. Dressed in the regulation uniform of the United States Army, tall and strong men generally speaking, they, considering that the regiment had not been fully armed but about ten days, spoke well for officers and men."" &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First Regiment

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton…

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments at Fort Donelson, February 15th, 1862, resulting in the capture of the works on the following morning. The Iowa Second Regiment led the charge, followed by the rest in their order. The sight was sublime. Onward they sped, heedless of the bullets and balls of the enemy above. The hill was so steep, the timber cleared, that the Confederates left a gap in their lines of rifle pits on this crest of hill. Through this gap they were bound to go. Right up they went, climbing upon all fours, their line of dark-blue clothing advancing regularly forward, the white line of smoke from the top of the works opposed by a line of the Federal troops. "They reach the top. Numbers fall. The surprise was breathless. See, they climb over the works- they fall- they are lost! Another group, and still another and another, close up the gap. All is covered in smoke. The lodgment is made; the troops swarm up the hillside, their bright bayonets glittering in the sun. The firing slackens. Close behind the brigade Captain Stone's batery of rifled 10-pounders was tugging up the hill, the horses plunging, the riders whipping. Upward they go, where never vehicle went before- up the precipitous and clogged sides of the hill. No sooner on the crest than the guns were unlimbered, the men at their posts. Percussion shells and canister were shot spitefully from the Parrott guns at the flying enemy. The day was gained, cheers upon cheers rent the air, and in a few minutes all was hushed."" &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Storming of Fort Donelson

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments…

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862- lowering the Confederate flag."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Macon

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862- lowering the Confederate flag."— Frank Leslie,…

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Fort Pitt

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

An illustration of the defense at Fort Sumter.

Defense at Fort Sumter

An illustration of the defense at Fort Sumter.

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate army- their enthusiastic reception by the inhabitants, September 12th, 1862. Most certainly it was distance that lent enchantment to the view of the eyes of the Marylanders, so far as the Confederate army was concerned, for it appeared that, instead of 50,000 recruits so confidently predicted by Mr. Miles, one of the Confederate Congress of Richmond, they did not actually realize more then 700, and of these nearly 300 refused to carry out their enlistments. All accounts proved that the Confederate army was of the Felstaffian regime, and not at all calculated to make a favorable impression upon the olfactory and pecuniary faculties of the Secessionists of Maryland. When the Confederate generals, with their staffs, entered Frederick City, they were at first welcomed, but when the ragged regiments made their appearance a change came over the spirit of their dream, and the inhabitants woke from their delusion. Our sketch reprsents the rapturous reception given to Gneral McClellan. It was a perfect ovation. Flowers were showered down upon the Federals, while the waving of flags and the cheers of the inhabitants completed the inspiring scene." —Leslie, 1896

Frederick City

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate…

State house in Fredricksburg.

State House, Fredricksburg VA

State house in Fredricksburg.