"One end of the cup-adjusting hub, with inward bearings. The cones are formed of one piece with the spindles, and the adjusting cp C is screwed in the end of the hub shell, and locked in position by the screwed locking-ring R. The figure also illustrates a divided spindle for facilitating the removal of the tire for repair when required without disturbing the wheel, bearings, chain or gear-case. The chain side of the hub-spindle, not shown in the figure, is secured to the frame in the usual way; on the left side the spindle S projects very little beyond the adjusting cup. A distance washer W is placed between the end of the spindle S and the fork-end F. A detachable screw-pin, or the footstep, P, passes through the washer W, and is screwed into the end of the spindle S, the hexagod head of the detachable pin drawing all the parts securely together." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Cup-adjusting Hub

"One end of the cup-adjusting hub, with inward bearings. The cones are formed of one piece with the…

A portable drill having a cutting and a feeding motion.

Clamp Drill

A portable drill having a cutting and a feeding motion.

"An ordinary vertical drilling machine, one of comparatively small size and single-geared having been chosen rather than a larger example with greater complication. When once properly started, this machine is self-acting, but for each hole the work has to be adjusted by hand so as to bring the required portion exactly under the drill spindle, and the small size of the table prevents its being at any great distance from the edge." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1903

Drilling Machine

"An ordinary vertical drilling machine, one of comparatively small size and single-geared having been…

"Fusil, In heraldry, a bearing differing from the lozenge in being longer in proportion to its breadth, and named from its shape, which resembles that of a spindle." -Whitney, 1911

Fusil Azure

"Fusil, In heraldry, a bearing differing from the lozenge in being longer in proportion to its breadth,…

"The spindle, was always, when in use, accompanied by the distaff, as an indispensable part of the same apparatus. The wool, flax, or other material, haing been prepared for spinning, was rolled into a ball, which was however, sufficiently loose to allow the fibres to be easily drawn out by the hand of the spinner. The upper part of the distaff was then inserted into this mass of flax or wool, and the lower part was held under the left arm in such a position as was most convenient for conducting the operation. The fibres were drawn out, and at the same time spirally twisted, chiefly by the use of the fore-finger and thumb of the right hand; and the thread so produced was wound upon the spindle until the quantity was as great as it would carry." — Smith, 1873.

Fusus

"The spindle, was always, when in use, accompanied by the distaff, as an indispensable part of the same…

"<em>The involuntary muscles</em> consist of ribbon-shaped bands which surround hollow tubes or cavities in the body. They are never attached to bony levers nor are they furnished with tendons, as are the voluntary muscles." &mdash; Blaisedell, 1904

Spindle cell of involuntary muscle

"The involuntary muscles consist of ribbon-shaped bands which surround hollow tubes or cavities…

"In the ordinary pattern of a lapidary's bench the handle turns in a horizontal plane, where W is the driving-wheel turned by the handle A, and working the pulley P by means of a strap. The pulley is fixed on a vertical spindle, which carries M the disk for slitting or the leaden lap for roughing or polishing. The upper end of this spindle is conical, and rotates in a socket drilled in a horizontal arm of iron which projects from a vertical wooden rod D. A block of wood C fits on to the end of an iron support termed the gim-peg or germ-peg. This support is used to steady the operator's arm when grinding the edges of small stones, and the wooden block, which is fixed by a wedge, is employed for cutting facets at any desired angle, the stone being cemented to the end of a stik S, which is fixed at the requisite angle in one of the holes or notches made in the sides of the socket C." &mdash;The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Lapidary's Mill

"In the ordinary pattern of a lapidary's bench the handle turns in a horizontal plane, where W is the…

"Part of Lapidary's Mill. A, upper summer (cut through); B, lower summer (cut through); C, spindle; D, pulley; E, lap; F, table (cut through); g, g, wooden blocks, adjusted by means of wedges." &mdash;The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Lapidary's Mill

"Part of Lapidary's Mill. A, upper summer (cut through); B, lower summer (cut through); C, spindle;…

Micrometer

Micrometer

Micrometer

"Non-striped spindle-shaped cells which branch and join with one another." &mdash; Richardson, 1906

Non-Striated Muscle

"Non-striped spindle-shaped cells which branch and join with one another." — Richardson, 1906

"The common spindle tree (<em>Euonymus europaeus</em>) is a European shrub, which bears glossy lanceolate leaves, and in late spring clusters of small greenish flowers, followed by fruits which become beautifully rose colored."&mdash;Finley, 1917

Spindle tree

"The common spindle tree (Euonymus europaeus) is a European shrub, which bears glossy lanceolate…

Flower of the spindle tree.

Spindle Tree Flower

Flower of the spindle tree.

Fruit of the spindle tree.

Spindle tree fruit

Fruit of the spindle tree.

"The spindle proper is simply the metal rod and horsehoe-shaped piece of wood with its two rows of little hooks or teeth." - Beard, 1906

Diagram of a spindle

"The spindle proper is simply the metal rod and horsehoe-shaped piece of wood with its two rows of little…

A spindle is a cone shaped weigh that hooked the thread to one end and would allow the person to spin the wool to create thread. The distaff is a tool to keep the thread untangled in the spinning process.

Distaff and spindle

A spindle is a cone shaped weigh that hooked the thread to one end and would allow the person to spin…

"The spinning-wheel." - Beard, 1906

Diagram of a spinning-wheel

"The spinning-wheel." - Beard, 1906

"The use of the spindle and loom, sewing, braiding, etc, form the subjects of many of the paintings, as also the process of cultivating flax, beating and combing it." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Egyptian weaving

"The use of the spindle and loom, sewing, braiding, etc, form the subjects of many of the paintings,…