149 illustrations of trees including: bald cypress, balsam fir, banana, banyan, baobab, basswood, beaked willow, beech, birch, butternut, black ash, black cottonwood, black oak, black walnut, bladdernut, bottle tree, breadfruit, buckeye, bull pine, bur oak, butternut, and buttonwood

Transverse section of a bilocular ovary.

Bread-Fruit Tree

Transverse section of a bilocular ovary.

Breadfruit is a tree and fruit native to the East Indian Ocean and Western Pacific Ocean Islands.

Breadfruit

Breadfruit is a tree and fruit native to the East Indian Ocean and Western Pacific Ocean Islands.

The breadfruit bears an edible fruit and contains milky sap.

Breadfruit

The breadfruit bears an edible fruit and contains milky sap.

"The breadfruit is a large, globular fruit of a pale-green color, about the size of a child's head, marked on the surface with irregular six-sided depressions, and containing a white and somewhat fibrous pulp, which when ripe becomes juicy and yellow. The tree that produces it grows wild in Tahiti and other islands of the South Seas. it is about 40 feet high, with large and spreading branches, and has large bright green leaves, deeply divided into seven or nine spear-shaped lobes. The eatable part of this fruit lies between the skin and the core, and it is as white as snow and somewhat of the consistence of new bread."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Breadfruit

"The breadfruit is a large, globular fruit of a pale-green color, about the size of a child's head,…

"The breadfruit is a large, globular fruit of a pale-green color, about the size of a child's head, marked on the surface with irregular six-sided depressions, and containing a white and somewhat fibrous pulp, which when ripe becomes juicy and yellow. The tree that produces it grows wild in Tahiti and other islands of the South Seas. it is about 40 feet high, with large and spreading branches, and has large bright green leaves, deeply divided into seven or nine spear-shaped lobes. The eatable part of this fruit lies between the skin and the core, and it is as white as snow and somewhat of the consistence of new bread."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Breadfruit Fruit

"The breadfruit is a large, globular fruit of a pale-green color, about the size of a child's head,…

This tree belongs to the pacific coast lands, its stock bears closely grained wood.

Taxus Brevifolia

This tree belongs to the pacific coast lands, its stock bears closely grained wood.

Also known as Picea breweriana. A species of spruce tree native to western North America.

Brewer Spruce Pine Cone

Also known as Picea breweriana. A species of spruce tree native to western North America.

Leaves alternate, not prominently toothed, subcordate at the base.

Breweria

Leaves alternate, not prominently toothed, subcordate at the base.

"1. fruit of Brexia madagascariensis; 2. a cross section of it; 3. a seed; 4. the same divided perpendicularly." -Lindley, 1853

Brexia

"1. fruit of Brexia madagascariensis; 2. a cross section of it; 3. a seed; 4. the same divided perpendicularly."…

Also known as Thrinax microcarpa. A small palm native to Florida and the Caribbean.

Branch of Brittle Thatch Palm

Also known as Thrinax microcarpa. A small palm native to Florida and the Caribbean.

"Dissected bud of buckeye (Aesculus macrostachya), showing transitions from bud-scales to leaves." -Bergen, 1896

Buckeye Bud

"Dissected bud of buckeye (Aesculus macrostachya), showing transitions from bud-scales to leaves." -Bergen,…

The fruit of the Buckeye, Aesculus glabra, (Keeler, 1915).

Buckeye Fruit

The fruit of the Buckeye, Aesculus glabra, (Keeler, 1915).

A buckeye leaf.

Buckeye Leaf

A buckeye leaf.

"The fall of the horse-chestnut leaf." -Bergen, 1896

Buckeye Leaves

"The fall of the horse-chestnut leaf." -Bergen, 1896

"Leaf arrangement of horse-chestnut on vertical shoots." -Bergen, 1896

Buckeye Leaves

"Leaf arrangement of horse-chestnut on vertical shoots." -Bergen, 1896

"Leaf arrangement of horse-chestnut on vertical shoots." -Bergen, 1896

Buckeye Leaves

"Leaf arrangement of horse-chestnut on vertical shoots." -Bergen, 1896

A Florida plant, the buckwheat tree: "Mylocaryum ligustrinum. 1. a flower; 2. stamens; 3. ovary; 4. section of seed." -Lindley, 1853

Buckwheat Tree

A Florida plant, the buckwheat tree: "Mylocaryum ligustrinum. 1. a flower; 2. stamens; 3. ovary; 4.…

This illustration shows a tree that has been both body and branch-budded.

Budding

This illustration shows a tree that has been both body and branch-budded.

Also known as Pinus ponderosa. The pine cone of a Bull Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Bull Pine

Also known as Pinus ponderosa. The pine cone of a Bull Pine tree.

Also known as Quercus macrocarpa. The branch of the Bur Oak tree, native to North America.

Branch of Bur Oak

Also known as Quercus macrocarpa. The branch of the Bur Oak tree, native to North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; lobed (the edge of the lobes entire, or of the larger ones sometimes wavy). Outline - reverse egg-shape. Apex - of the lobes, rounded. Base - wedge-shape. Leaf - six to fifteen inches long (the longest of the oak-leaves); smooth above, downy beneath; the lobes usually long and rather irregular, the middle ones longest and often extending nearly to the middle rib. Bark - of the young branches always marked with corky wings or ridges. Acorns - large, with short stems. Cup - two thirds to two inches across, roughly covered with pointed scales, and heavily fringed around the nut. Nut - very large (one to one and a half inches long); broad egg-shape; one half to two thirds or often wholly enclosed by the cup. Found - along the coast of Maine southward as far as the Penobscot, in Western New England, in Western New York, in Pennsylvania, and thence westward to the foot-hills of the Rocky Mountains of Montana, and from Central Nebraska and Kansas southwest to the Indian Territory and Texas. It is found farther west and northwest than any other oak of the Atlantic forests. In the prairie region it forms a principal growth of the "Oak Openings." General Information - One of the most valuable and widely distributed oaks in North America, growing sixty to eighty feet in height, or more, with hard, tough wood resembling that of the White Oak. "The most interesting thing about this tree, perhaps is its power, quite unknown in the other White Oaks, of adapting itself to very different climatic conditions, which enables it to live in the humid climate of Maine and Vermont, to flourish in the somewhat drier climate of the Mississippi Valley, and to exist (still farther west) in the driest and most exposed region in habited by any of the Eastern America Oaks." - Sargent. Q. m. olivaformis is a variety found only in a few districts (near Albany and in Pennsylvania), having narrower and rather more deeply lobed leaves. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; lobed (the edge of the lobes entire, or of the larger ones sometimes wavy).…

"Combretum (or Poivrea) purpureum. 1. a flower cut open; 2. a section of the ovary." -Lindley, 1853

Bushwillow

"Combretum (or Poivrea) purpureum. 1. a flower cut open; 2. a section of the ovary." -Lindley, 1853

Butternut branch, with accessory buds, the uppermost above the axil.

Butternut Branch

Butternut branch, with accessory buds, the uppermost above the axil.

A butternut leaf.

Butternut Leaf

A butternut leaf.

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, fifteen to seventeen); alternate; edge of leaflets sharp-toothed. Outline - of leaflet, long egg-shaped or long oval. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - rounded. Leaf/Stem - downy and sticky. Leaf - twelve to twenty inches long. Leaflet - three inches or more in length; downy, especially beneath. Bark - of the branches, light gray and smoothish. Twigs - as well as leaf-stems and fruit, very sticky. Fruit - long (two to three inches), pointed. Husk - very sticky; green at first; brown when ripe, becoming very dark; not splitting in sections. Nut - deeply and roughly furrowed and sharp-ridged, with a sweet oily kernel. September.Found - in Southern Canada, and common in New England and the Middle and Western States. General Information - A tree twenty to fifty feet high, with a short, stout trunk and very wide-reaching, horizontal branches. The heart-wood is reddish or light brown, not as dark nor as hard as in the Black Walnut. It is used for ornamental cabinet-work and interior finish.

Genus Juglans, L. (Walnut)

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, fifteen to seventeen); alternate; edge of leaflets sharp-toothed.…

Some wood-cells from Buttonwood, Platanus, a whole cell and lower end of another on the left; a cell cut half away lengthwise, and half of another on the right; some pores or pits (a) seen on the left; while <em>b b</em> mark sections through these on the cut surface. When lving and young the protoplasm extends into these and by minuter perforations connects across them. In age the pits become open passages, facilitating the passage of sap and air.

Buttonwood

Some wood-cells from Buttonwood, Platanus, a whole cell and lower end of another on the left; a cell…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge variable, either coarse-toothed or somewhat lobed; with the teeth or lobes sharp, and the hollows between them rounded. Outline - rounded. Apex - pointed. Base - more or less heart-shaped, squared, or rounded. Leaf/Stem - downy when young, smoothish when old; and covering the leaf-bud with its swollen base. Leaf - three and a half to eight inches wide, and usually broader than long; downy beneath when young, becoming smooth. Bark - the thin outer bark peels off each year in hard and brittle strips, leaving the branches and parts of the trunk with a mottled, whitish, polished-looking surface. Flowers - small, in compact, round balls (about one inch in diameter) like round buttons, which dry and harden, and cling to the branches by their slender stems (three to four inches long), and swing like little bells during a good part of the winter. Found - from Southern Main, southward and westward, in rich, moist soil, oftenest along streams. Its finest growth is in the bottom lands of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers. General Information - The largest of the trees of the Atlantic forests, commonly sixty to eighty feet high; along the western rivers often eighty to one hundred and thirty feet high, sometimes more, with a circumference of forty to fifty feet. A tree in Eaton, N. J., is one of the largest in the Sate. It is eighty-five feel high. At a point eight fee from the ground its circumference is fourteen feet three inches. The largest trunks are usually hollow.  The wood is hard and compact, difficult to split and work, of a reddish-brown color within. Its principle use is in the making of tobacco boxes. There is a fine and somewhat noted group of these trees on the grounds of James Know, in Knoxboro, N. Y. In old times they formed a favorite camping place for the Indians in their trading expeditions. They all measure not far from three feet in diameter. The name "sycamore," though a common one, should be dropped - it belongs to another and very different tree. From a Greek word meaning broad, in reference to the breadth of the buttonwood's shade or of its leaf.

Genus Platanus, L. (Buttonwood)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge variable, either coarse-toothed or somewhat lobed; with the teeth or…

"Byrsanthus Brownii. 1. diagram of the flower; 2. section of a flower; 3. section across the ovary; 4. section of a seed." -Lindley, 1853

Byrsanthus

"Byrsanthus Brownii. 1. diagram of the flower; 2. section of a flower; 3. section across the ovary;…

Abies Balsamea (Balsam Fir) or Balm of Gilead Fir, lvs. dark green and lustrous above, pale below, rounded or obtusely short pointed and occasionally emarginate, acute or acuminate on fertile branches: cones oblong, cylindrical, purple, 2&1/2-4 in. long; bracts shorter or rarely slightly longer than their scales." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Balsam Fir Tree Cone

Abies Balsamea (Balsam Fir) or Balm of Gilead Fir, lvs. dark green and lustrous above, pale below, rounded…