The Famous People in Religion ClipArt gallery includes 76 portraits of theologians, clergy, and other religious leaders.

The first archbishop of Canterbury

St. Augustine

The first archbishop of Canterbury

"St. Patrick appears to have been a native of Boulogne, in France, and to have been born about the year 387, A.D. In his sixteenth year, he was made captive in a marauding expedition, conducted by Nial of the Nine Hostages." — Goodrich, 1844

St. Patrick

"St. Patrick appears to have been a native of Boulogne, in France, and to have been born about the year…

Saint Stephen I was Grand Prince of the Magyars (997-1001) and the first King of Hungary (1001-1038). He greatly expanded Hungarian control over the Carpathian Basin during his lifetime, broadly established Christianity in the region, and he is generally considered to be the founder of Hungary. Stephen I was canonized, together with his son and Bishop Gerard of Csanád, on August 20, 1083, becoming one of the most popular saints in Hungary.

Stephen I of Hungary

Saint Stephen I was Grand Prince of the Magyars (997-1001) and the first King of Hungary (1001-1038).…

(1821-1900) American clergyman

Richard S. Storrs

(1821-1900) American clergyman

Josip Juraj Strossmayer (February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a Roman Catholic bishop, benefactor and a politician from Croatia. Josip Juraj Strossmayer died at the age of 90. The university of the city of Osijek is named after him, and a large statue of Strossmayer is located in the park that the Academy building overlooks. The city of Dakovo built in memorial museum in 1991.

Josip Juraj Strossmayer

Josip Juraj Strossmayer (February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a Roman Catholic bishop, benefactor and…

Famous U.S. clergyman.

David Swing

Famous U.S. clergyman.

Jeremy Taylor (1613 – 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame as an author during The Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. He is sometimes known as the "Shakespeare of Divines" for his poetic style of expression and was often presented as a model of prose writing. He was under the patronage of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury. He went on to become chaplain in ordinary to King Charles I as a result of Laud's sponsorship. This made him politically suspect when Laud was tried for treason and executed in 1645 by the Puritan Parliament during the English Civil War. After the Parliamentary victory over the King, he was briefly imprisoned several times.

Bishop Jeremy Taylor

Jeremy Taylor (1613 – 13 August 1667) was a clergyman in the Church of England who achieved fame…

(1832-1920) Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church

Bishop J. H. Vincent

(1832-1920) Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church

(1703-1791) English clergyman and founder of Methodism.

John Wesley

(1703-1791) English clergyman and founder of Methodism.

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was the founder of the (Evangelical) Arminian Methodist movement. Methodism began as an unflattering nickname of the "Holy Club" at Oxford University founded by Charles Wesley but led by brother John. Methodism was well advanced in England through George Whitefield who had taken over the responsibility of the Holy Club while the Wesley brothers were in Savannah, Georgia British North America. On John Wesley's return to England in 1737 he publically criticised Whitefield for his evangelical preaching.

John Wesley

John Wesley (June 28 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was…

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA (1789; 1795–1836), the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania (1787–1836), and the second United States Senate Chaplain (appointed December 9, 1790).

William White

The Most Reverend William White (April 4, 1748 N.S. – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth…

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen. Whitgift's theological views were often controversial.

Archbishop John Whitgift

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted…

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697 and 1755. When he came to the Isle of Man, he found the buildings of the diocese in a ruinous condition. The building of new churches was one of his first acts, and he eventually rebuilt most of the churches of the diocese along with establishing public libraries. Wilson worked to restore ecclesiastical discipline on the island, although he clashed with civil authorities partly because of the reduction of revenue from Wilson mitigating fines in the spiritual court.

Bishop Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697…

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, was an English statesman and a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. Wolsey's affairs prospered and by 1514 he had become the controlling figure in all matters of state and extremely powerful within the Church. The highest political position he attained was Lord Chancellor, the King's chief advisor, enjoying great freedom and often depicted as an alter rex (other king). Within the Church he became archbishop of York, the second most important see in England, and then was made a cardinal in 1515, giving him precedence over even the Archbishop of Canterbury. His main legacy is from his interest in architecture, in particular his old home of Hampton Court Palace, which stands today.

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey

Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (c.1470~1471 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), who was born in Ipswich,…

An American Roman Catholic, prelate, born in Philadelphia, April 27, 1813; died there June 20, 1883.

James Frederick Wood

An American Roman Catholic, prelate, born in Philadelphia, April 27, 1813; died there June 20, 1883.

A sculpture of John Wycliffe, an English theologian, lay preacher, translator and reformist. Wycliffe was an early dissident in the Roman Catholic Church during the 14th century. His followers are known as Lollards, a somewhat rebellious movement which preached a legalistic Gospel. He is considered the founder of the Lollard movement, a precursor to the Protestant Reformation (for this reason, he is sometimes called "The Morning Star of the Reformation"). He was one of the earliest opponents of papal authority influencing secular power.

Sculpture of John Wycliffe

A sculpture of John Wycliffe, an English theologian, lay preacher, translator and reformist. Wycliffe…