The 1861-1865 Civil War Land Battles ClipArt gallery offers 262 illustrations of land battles that were fought between the Union and the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

"Siege of Vicksburg-the Twenty-third Indiana and Forty-fifth Illinois Regiments, Leggett's Brigade, Logan's Division, McPherson's Corps, storming Fort Hill, after the explosion of the mine, June 26th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Vicksburg

"Siege of Vicksburg-the Twenty-third Indiana and Forty-fifth Illinois Regiments, Leggett's Brigade,…

"The War in Virginia. Capture of three Confederate guns, near Culpepper, by General Custer's cavalry brigade, September 14th, 1863. Our sketch represents General Custer's brilliant capture of Confederate cannon near Culpepper. General Pleasonton, on the 14th of September, 1863, drove the Confederates back on Culpepper, and General Custer with his brigade came up with Stuart's horse artillery, which he charged twice, himself at the head, and the second time took guns, limbers, horses and men. His horse was killed by a round shot, which wounded the general in the leg and killed a bugler behind him. Our artist gives a spirited view of this brilliant affair which cannot fail to be of interest."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The War in Virginia. Capture of three Confederate guns, near Culpepper, by General Custer's cavalry…

"The war in Virginia- officers and men of Meade's army discovering unburied Federal dead on the old battlefield of Bull Run. Our sketch was taken on the ground where the Fifth Corps was repulsed on the second day of the battle of Groveton in 1862. The old railroad embankment and cut where the Confederates held their position, defying the efforts of the Federals, who lost so terribly in the attempt, appear on the right, while in front a group of officers and men are gazing on the unburied remains of gallant men, which claim a sepulchre soon given them. Our correspondent wrote: 'In the long, luxuriant grass one strikes his foot against skulls and bones, mingled with the deadly missiles that brought them to the earth. Hollow skulls lie contiguous to the hemispheres of exploded shells. The shallow graves rise here and there above the grass, sometimes in rows, sometimes alone, or scattered at irregular intervals.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia- officers and men of Meade's army discovering unburied Federal dead on the old…

"The war in Virginia. Battery on the left of the enemy's line, in front of Petersburg, captured by the Eighteenth Army corps. The Confederate works on the left are shown in our sketch. These were carried after a desperate fight. Duncan bears the glory of the achievement. This battery taken gave a view of Petersburg and its spires. Our correspondent said: 'The suddenness and celerity of Grant's movements baffle all calculations. Fertile in resources, untiring, persistent to the obstinacy, his movements are seldom anticipated or met. Yet here, in the struggle at Petersburg he found no loophole. His splendid transfer of his army to the south of the James seemed to lay Petersburg at his feet, but he found himself met by all the scientific resources of modern engineering.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia. Battery on the left of the enemy's line, in front of Petersburg, captured by the…

"The war in Virginia- Confederate signal station near Beverley Ford."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia- Confederate signal station near Beverley Ford."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The war in Virginia. General Butler's lines south of the James, Va., with troops in position near the Federal centre, awaiting an attack previous to the arrival of General Grant's army, June 3rd, 1864. The sudden transfer of operations by General Grant from the old battle ground on the Chickahominy, historic from the bloody campaign of 1862, and laden with the deadly miasm of the Chickahominy swamps, to the point south of the James River occupied by General Butler, gave that comparatively fresh locality additional interest to the public. We lay before our readers a sketch of the fortifications between the James and the Appomattox. Our view is taken from within, showing the shelter tents inside the works, and the men manning the line, awaiting an attack of the enemy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia. General Butler's lines south of the James, Va., with troops in position near the…

"The war in Virginia- railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Virginia

"The war in Virginia- railroad bridge over the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station."— Frank…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

A wilderness battle during the Civil War.

Wilderness Battle

A wilderness battle during the Civil War.

"An incident of the Battle of the Wilderness. Lieutenant General Grant and Major General Meade in consultation, as seen by our special artist. Our correspondent sent us the following interesting account of Grant during the battle of the Wilderness: 'A stranger to the insignia of military rank would have little dreamed that this plain, quiet man, apparently heedless and unmoved, was the one upon whom the fortunes of the day, if not of the age and country, were hinging. It was only when some aid or orderly rode up in hot haste with a communication from some portion of the battlefield that his eyes upturned to seek in those of the messenger the purport of the message. The consultation with General Meade, or the direct suggestion or command- all took place with that same imperturbability of countenance for which he has always been remarkable. No movement of the enemy seemed to puzzle or disconcert him. Fertile in resources, the petition for reinforcements was speedily answered, and while all this transpired he stood calmly in the group, at times smoking his favorite cigar.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of the Wilderness

"An incident of the Battle of the Wilderness. Lieutenant General Grant and Major General Meade in consultation,…

"The battle of the Wilderness, between General Grant and General Lee, May 5th and 6th, 1864. Our sketch of the first of the great battles of General Grant in Virginia will give a striking idea of the battleground, to be henceforth forever famous, like Manassas, Gettysburg, Pittsburg Landing or Fair Oaks. The eye can take in the five-mile line of battle, which for two days advanced and met hostile advances, gaining ground to be lost in a moment, but holding steadily to their lines till the furious Confederate charge on the Sixth Corps swept away Seymour's and Shaler's brigade of the Third Division and had well-nigh won the day. Sedgwick, soon to fall, saved the right; but the Federal loss in two days was not far from 15,000. Our correspondent gives this interesting account of General Grant during the battle: 'General Grant's headquarters were located in a field between the plank road and a small road leading to a little hamlet known as Parker's Store. During the fight, however, he was principally with General Meade, whose headquarters were on a piny knoll in the rear of Warren's corps. I had seen Grant at Vicksburg and in Tennessee, and his appearance was familiar; but as I strolled through the group of officers reclining under the trees at headquarters, I looked for him some time in vain, such was his insignificant, unpretending aspect and conduct while the battle was raging in all its fury. A stranger to the insignia of military rank would have little dreamed that the plain, quiet man who sat with his back against a tree, apparently heedless and unmoved, was the one upon whom the fortunes of the day, if not of the age and country, were hanging. It was only when some aid or orderly rode up in hot haste with a communication from some portion of the battlefield that his eyes upturnd to seek in those of the messenger the purport of the message. The consultation with General Meade, or the direct suggestion or command, all took place with the same imperturbability of countenance for which he has always been remarkable. No movement of the enemy seemed to puzzle or disconcert him. Fertile in resources, the petition for re-enforcement was speedily answered. And while all this transpired he stood calmly in the group, at times smoking his favorite cigar, a more vigorous or a more frequent puffing only indicating the inward working of his mind.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of the Wilderness

"The battle of the Wilderness, between General Grant and General Lee, May 5th and 6th, 1864. Our sketch…

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General Hancock's sudden charge decided the battle, for it left the real key of the position in Federal hands. With the re-enforcements with McClellan had caused to be sent him immediately upon reaching the scene, late in the afternoon. Hancock took possession of all the ground he had previously occupied, and night closed upon what proved to be a dearly bought victory for the Federals. They had, in fact, gained it after substaining a loss of 2,228 in killed and wounded, the Confederate loss being only about half that number. Early on the 6th of May Williamsburg was occupied by the Federals, while Johnston's army was again beyond the Chickahominy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Williamsburg

"Battle of Williamsburg, Va., on the peninsula between York and James Rivers, May 6th, 1862. General…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Sheridan's Campaign. Battle of Winchester- charge of Crook's Eighth Corps, September 19th, 1864- the right. Our sketches of this signal victory show the operations of the Eighth Corps on the right. In the foreground are Crook's veterans advancing to attack the forts on the right, which command Winchester, and which they took so gallantly by the aid of Averill's cavalry. The Federals, it will be perceived, charged under the fire of these forts as well as of the fire of the Confederates posted behind the broken stone wall and rail fence on the left, behind which may be seen the distant summit of Strasburg Mountain. Nor was this the only fighting. The centre nobly did its share, driving the Confederates from the woods to the right of our second sketch, and when they regained it forcing them again into the deadly grasp of Crook, literally filling the woods with dead."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Winchester Charge

"Sheridan's Campaign. Battle of Winchester- charge of Crook's Eighth Corps, September 19th, 1864- the…

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by General Tyler. The contest raged furiously till three o'clock in the afternoon, the fighting being done chiefly by the artillery and the musketry, at a range of not more than three or four hundred yards, and often much less. The Confederate infantry opposite the right now debouched from the woods, and attempted to capture Doan's battery by a charge. The first effort was nearly successful, but the heavy discharge of grape compelled them to retire in confusion. A second and weaker attempt likewise failed, and the enemy fell back, with heavy loss, behind the stone parapet. General Tyler then ordered his brigade to charge the enemy's batteries on the left, and a most deadly encounter followed. Twice the Federals reeled under storm; but in the third effort they routed the Confederates with tremendous slaughter, amid loud cheering, capturing two of their guns and four caissons." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Winchester

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by…

"Sheridan's Campaign- Battle of Winchester- position of the Nineteenth Corps, General Emory, September 19th, 18640 the centre."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Winchester

"Sheridan's Campaign- Battle of Winchester- position of the Nineteenth Corps, General Emory, September…

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield, Mo., on October 25th, 1861. After the first charge of Major Zagonyi, described on another page, Captain McNaughton reached the scene with fifty men. The order to follow retreating Confederates was given, and all dashed ahead for a second charge through the woods. Many of the fugitives were overtaken there, as well as in the streets of Springfield and in the forest beyond the city. Only when further pursuit seemed useless did the Federals return. Zagonyi's brave followers suffered a loss of eighty-four dead and wounded in this engagement, which, for the boldness of its undertaking and the rapidity of its execution under the great disparity of numbers, certainly has but few parallels in any history."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Zagonyi

"Second charge upon the Confederates by General Fremont's bodyguard, under Major Zagonyi, near Springfield,…