The 1861-1865 Civil War Places ClipArt gallery offers 182 illustrations of places that are famous due to battles or other events during the American Civil War.

Headquarters of General Freemont, Jefferson City, Missouri, October 1, 1861. Jefferson City is on the Missouri River, 142 miles from its mouth, and 125 miles from St. Louis. It is on the direct route of the Pacific Railroad. The location of Jefferson City is very striking. On the towering hill which frowns over the Missouri stands the Capitol, built of magnesium limestone. The town site is seamed with sharp ridges and deep hollows running parallel with the river. These had been eagerly taken advantage of in consctructing the fortifications. About a mile to the south of the city was the headquarters of General Fremont, situated upon a beautiful slope, commanding a fine military prospect. It was called Camp Lillie, after his eldest daughter, Lillie Benton Fremont.

Camp Lillie

Headquarters of General Freemont, Jefferson City, Missouri, October 1, 1861. Jefferson City is on the…

The house in which President Abraham Lincoln died.

The House in Which Lincoln Died

The house in which President Abraham Lincoln died.

"Prison at Little Rock."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Little Rock Prison

"Prison at Little Rock."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"View from the summit of Little Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Little Round Top

"View from the summit of Little Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Battle of Chattanooga and included the Battle of Lookout Mountain on November 25, 1863 during the American Civil War.

Top of Lookout Mountain

The Battle of Chattanooga and included the Battle of Lookout Mountain on November 25, 1863 during the…

"View from Loudon Heights, Va., showing Harper's Ferry, Maryland Heights, Bolivar, etc. Harper's Ferry, immortalized by the pen of Jefferson, became too often the scene of stirring events during the Civil War to require a long description, and we give a fine engraving of it to enable our readers to understand fully the operations that took place there. The view shows Maryland Heights, and on the other side Harper's Ferry, with the railroad and pontoon bridges. The place in the foreground is Bolivar, and the river runs in the gorge between it and Maryland Heights. This sketch was made by an artist who spent several days examining the neighborhood so as to give the best possible view of a point deemed so strategically important."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Loudon Heights

"View from Loudon Heights, Va., showing Harper's Ferry, Maryland Heights, Bolivar, etc. Harper's Ferry,…

"Admiral Dupont's machine shop, Station Creek, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Machine Shop

"Admiral Dupont's machine shop, Station Creek, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Remains of a Confederate camp at Manassas."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Manassas

"Remains of a Confederate camp at Manassas."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Manassasas Junction, showing the evacuated Confederate fortifications, abondoned camps and wagons, and the ruins of the railway depot and other buildings burnt by the Confederates. The sight here cannot be portrayed. The large machine shops, the station houses, the commissary and quartermaster store houses, all in ashes. On the track stood the wreck of a locomotive, and not far down the remains of four freight cars which had been burned; to the right 500 barrels of flour had been stored, and 200 barrels of vinegar and molasses had been allowed to try experiments in chemical combinations; some 50 barrels of pork and beef had been scattered around in the mud, and a few hundred yards down the track a dense cloud of smoke was arising from the remains of a factory which had been used for rendering tallow and boiling bones." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Manassasas Junction

"Manassasas Junction, showing the evacuated Confederate fortifications, abondoned camps and wagons,…

"The Marshall House, Alexandria, Va., where Colonel Ellsworth was assassinated by James W. Jackson, May 24th 1861."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Marshall House

"The Marshall House, Alexandria, Va., where Colonel Ellsworth was assassinated by James W. Jackson,…

The Marye House is located near Fredericksburg where skirmishes advanced towards during the Battle of Fredericksburg.

Marye House

The Marye House is located near Fredericksburg where skirmishes advanced towards during the Battle of…

The McLean residence, at the Appomattox Courthouse, where General Lee met with General Grant to sign an act of surrender.

McLean's House: The Place of Lee's Surrender

The McLean residence, at the Appomattox Courthouse, where General Lee met with General Grant to sign…

The Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, also known as the Battle of Mechanicsville or Ellerson's Mill, took place on June 26, 1862, in Hanover County, Virginia as the first major engagement of the Seven Days Battles of the American Civil War.

Mechanicsville, 1862

The Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, also known as the Battle of Mechanicsville or Ellerson's Mill, took…

"The Prison Pen at Millen, Ga., as it appeared previous to the arrival of General Sherman's Army. Our special artist has sketched this Golgotha, and we doubt not it will create in the bosom of our readers the same sentiments of horror which it did in those of the gallant soldiers who viewed with silent rage the scene of their brother soldiers' persecutions and sufferings. Our illustration will prove more eloquent than any description. Here were brave and starved men compelled to burrow like wild beasts, enduring all the pangs of hunger and the insults of their brutal jailers. The stockade was a square of five hundred feet, or an area of nearly fifteen acres. It was among pines, on dry rolling ground, although in a swampy region. The stockade was of pine logs, rising from twelve to fifteen feet above the ground; sentry boxes were placed along the top of the stockade, fifty feet apart, and reached from the outside by ladders. On the eastern part extended a ravine, through which ran a small stream of good water. About three thousand prisoners had been confined here. In this space were their huts, without regularity in arrangement, roofed with loose earth, supported by sticks."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Millen Prison Pen

"The Prison Pen at Millen, Ga., as it appeared previous to the arrival of General Sherman's Army. Our…

"Naval hospital and battery at Portsmouth, VA." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Naval hospital

"Naval hospital and battery at Portsmouth, VA." — Frank Leslie, 1896

"The war in Louisiana- New Iberia."— Frank Leslie, 1896

New Iberia

"The war in Louisiana- New Iberia."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications, Yorktown, VA., April 10th, 1862. On the 5th of April, 1862, the Federal advance neared the centre of the Confederate position, and found that its fortifications commanded the approach to Yorktown. It was here that Captain Martin's Massachusetts battery opened upon the enemy's forts and made several splendid shots. The Confederates returned the fire, killing a Federal gunner; a second shot wounded another, and a third killed one and wounded two more. The excellence of this practice immediately convinced Captain Martin that he had unfortunately placed his battery in front of a Confederate target. He consequently withdrew to the camp in the woods. The scene our artist has sketched is about one mile from Yorktown, and is in that part of the peninsula where it is only eight miles from river to river." —Leslie, 1896

Camp of Ninth Massachusetts

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications,…

"View of the town of Paducah, Ky., at the confluence of the rivers Ohio and Tennessee, the Northern terminus of the Mobile and Ohio railroad. This flourishing city, the capital of McCracken County, is situated at the confluence of the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, and is connected with Mobile by railroad. It had a fine range of warehouses fronting the river, contained five churches, two banks and two newspaper offices; it had also a marine hospital. Its position had given it many commercial advantages, which were fast operating to make it one of the most progressive cities of the West. When, however, the confederates took possession of the Columbus and Hickman, two important points in Kentucky on the Mississippi, it became necessary to hold them in check and to prevent their flanking the Federal stronghold of Cairo; and with his usual sagacity and promptitude, General Grant immediately occupied Paducah. This step, although an apparent invasion of the sacred soil of Kentucky, received the entire approval of that loyal and gallant Sate as expressed through her Legislature; and Paducah was of course retained while the necessity for its occupation existed. Paducah contained about 8,000 inhabitants, very few of whom were tainted with the secession treason. It is 47 miles east from Cairo, and 225 from Louisville. It is named after a famous Indian chief who formerly lived in its vicinity."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Paducah, Kentucky

"View of the town of Paducah, Ky., at the confluence of the rivers Ohio and Tennessee, the Northern…

"Paris, capital of Bourbon County, situated on Stoner Creek, Ky., occupied by Morgan's Guerrillas in 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Paris

"Paris, capital of Bourbon County, situated on Stoner Creek, Ky., occupied by Morgan's Guerrillas in…

"The campaign on the James River- General Butler landing at Fort Pawhatan."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Pawhatan

"The campaign on the James River- General Butler landing at Fort Pawhatan."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Pemberton's Headquarters is a two-story brick house that served as the headquarters for Confederate General John C. Pemberton during most of the 47 day siege of Vicksburg, and the site where he decided to surrender the city to Ulysses S. Grant on July 4, 1863.

General Pemberton's Headquarters at Vicksburg

Pemberton's Headquarters is a two-story brick house that served as the headquarters for Confederate…

"Cages of Little Rock Penitentiary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

penitentiary

"Cages of Little Rock Penitentiary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Interior of the outbuilding attached to Marshal Kane's Police Headquarters, Holliday Street, Baltimore- discovery of cannon, muskets and ammunition intended for the service of the Secessionists. General Banks promptly arrested Marshal Kane as the most active Secessionist in Maryland, and incarcerated him in Fort McHenry. He supplied his place by Colonel Kenley, a tried and trustworthy officer. Provost Marshal Kenley actively pursued his search after concealed arms. He took possession of the late marshal's office, the entrance of which was guarded by a cannon planted in the hall and officers with drawn swords, a precautionary measure rendered necessary by the disturbed state of the city. The search after arms was eminently successful. In an old back building of the City Hall, used by Marshal Kane, were found two 6-pounder and two 4-pounder guns, half ton of assorted shot, four hundredweight of ball, eight hundred rifle-ball cartridges, gun carriages, etc. In the office and under the marshal's office, in the floors and in the ceiling, arms and ammunition were found, among them a case of splendid pistols, two hundred and fifty muskets and rifles, twenty-five of which were Minie, besides several muskets which were supposed to belong to the Massachusetts soldiers disarmed by the mob on April 19th." —Leslie, 1896

Police headquarters

"Interior of the outbuilding attached to Marshal Kane's Police Headquarters, Holliday Street, Baltimore-…

"Long Bridge across the Potomac at Washington, D.C." -Gordy, 1916

Potomac River Long Bridge

"Long Bridge across the Potomac at Washington, D.C." -Gordy, 1916

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Camp Princeton, taken from the intenchments constructed by the brigade at the junction of the Alexandria and Columbia Roads." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Princeton

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"The humors of a prison- scene in a station-house cell, Washington, D. C., after the appointment of the provost marshall, General Porter, October 1861. After the appointment of General Porter as provost marshal there was a marked improvement in the public thoroughfares of Washington. Till then too many officers imbibed at Willard's and other fashionable bars, while their men drank at the lower grogshops. The result was a saturnalia of drunkenness and military insurbordination which culminated at Bull Run. Our sketch represents the incongruous elements found one early morning the cell of a station house." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison

"The humors of a prison- scene in a station-house cell, Washington, D. C., after the appointment of…

"The great Prison Pen at Andersonville, Ga. The stockade was orginally eleven acres, which was increased to fifteen on July 2nd, 1864, which made it one thousand six hundred yards around, with fifty-two posts, or sentry boxes, reached by steps from the outside. Parallel with the stockade, and twenty feet distant, was the dead line, which consisted of posts six inches thick, with a strip of scantling nailed on the top to form a rail."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison Pen

"The great Prison Pen at Andersonville, Ga. The stockade was orginally eleven acres, which was increased…

"Wall side of the Prison Pen at Millen, Ga."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison Pen wall

"Wall side of the Prison Pen at Millen, Ga."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United States Government in 1829-31, for the defense of Tybee Roads and the Savannah River approach to the city of Savannah, Georgia. In January, 1861, it was seized and occupied by the military authorities of the State of Georgia, and held by them until transferred to the Confederate Government, by whom it was strongly armed and garrisoned. In form it was pentagonal; its walls were forty feet high, and presented two faces on the sea approach. The full armament of the fort consisted on the lower tier of 65 32-pounders, and the upper tier of 53 24-pounders, 4 18-pounders flanking howitzers, 1 13-inch mortar, 12 8-inch columbiads, and 7 10-inch mortars. The interior of the fort was well supplied with massive furnaces for heating shot, officers' quarters, soldiers' barracks, magazines, and a tolerable supply of shot and powder.

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United…

"The city of Fredericksburg, VA., from the North side of the Rappahannock- from a sketch by our special artist with General McDowell's division in 1862." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Rappahannock

"The city of Fredericksburg, VA., from the North side of the Rappahannock- from a sketch by our special…

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates in their retreat from Falmouth, April 19th, 1862. On April 17th, 1862, General McDowell, with his division of the Federal army, arrived on the banks of the Rappahannock, the Confederates retreating and burning the bridge which connected Falmouth with Fredericksburg. The city capitulated the next day. Our artist wrote, "I send you a sketch of the rebuilding of the railroad bridge across the Rappahannock. The rapidity with which our Northern men rebuilt the burnt bridge, and the strength and excellence of the work, caused the astonishment of the inhabitants of the city. The supports are made of pine logs cut from the adjacent forest, and the time occupied in putting the structure over was about six days."" —Leslie, 1896

Rappahannock bridge

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates…

"The war in Virginia. General Meade recrossing the Rappahannock, October, 1863, before Lee's advance. General Meade, whose forces had been weakened to reinforce the Army of the Cumberland, was no longer in a condition to hold the position so long and so often occupied by the Federal army, and on October 10th began to fall back toward Washington, covering his retrograde movement so completely that General Lee was foiled in all his attempts to gain his rear, annoy his flanks or crush his rear guard. Our artist shows his army recrossing the Rappahannock."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Recrossing the Rappahannock

"The war in Virginia. General Meade recrossing the Rappahannock, October, 1863, before Lee's advance.…

The devastation in Richmond Virginia following the campaign against Richmond.

Devastation in Richmond

The devastation in Richmond Virginia following the campaign against Richmond.

"View of Rolla, Mo., taken from the fort." —Leslie, 1896

Rolla

"View of Rolla, Mo., taken from the fort." —Leslie, 1896

"Encampment of the Federal army near Rolla, Mo. The city of Rolla has been famous since the death of heroic Lyon, when the scattered forces of that glorious but disastrous day, under the guidance of General Siegel, made their first secure resting place. Our illustration is particularly interesting, as it takes in the last encampment of the Federal Army, showing the positions of the chief divisions of Generals Asboth, Siegel and Wymans. Rolla is on the direct route of the railroad from St. Louis to Springfield, being about midway between those cities. It is about sixty miles from Pilot Knob and fifty from Jefferson City. Our artist said: "The high rolling country around Rolla is admirably adapted for a camping ground. Fine streams of clear water intersect in all directions; the ground is gravelly and dry, and all the hills are covered with oak timber. The camping grounds are all gently sloping, facing the south, and are well protected from the cold north and northwest winds by the high ridges on the north."" —Leslie, 1896

Rolla camp

"Encampment of the Federal army near Rolla, Mo. The city of Rolla has been famous since the death of…

"Round Top in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Round Top

"Round Top in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Visit of Union and Confederate officers to Gettysburg, the ascent of Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Ascent of Round Top

"Visit of Union and Confederate officers to Gettysburg, the ascent of Round Top."— Frank Leslie,…

A Sanitary Commission lodge near Alexandria, Virginia during the Civil War.

Sanitary Commission

A Sanitary Commission lodge near Alexandria, Virginia during the Civil War.

"View of Savannah, Ga., looking east, toward Fort Jackson. Savannah, the entry port of Georgia, is built on a sandy plain, forty feet above low-water mark. It is the centre of a very extensive system of railroads, which contribute greatly to its commercial importance. As a harbor for blockade runners it was not of much importance after Fort Pulaski fell into the Federal hands. Savannah was founded by General Oglethorpe in 1732. The river is navigable for steamers up to Augusta, 230 miles from its mouth, Savannah itself being 18 miles from the sea. Our view was taken from the cupola of the Exchange, looking east, with Fort Jackson on the left."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Savannah

"View of Savannah, Ga., looking east, toward Fort Jackson. Savannah, the entry port of Georgia, is built…

"The war on the Upper Potomac- Wilson's Cavalry foraging at the Selden Estate, Clarke County, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Selden Estate

"The war on the Upper Potomac- Wilson's Cavalry foraging at the Selden Estate, Clarke County, Va."—…

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters during the March to the Sea.

Sherman's Headquarters

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters during the March to the Sea.

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters in Savannah.

Sherman's Headquarters in Savannah

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters in Savannah.

"Carlisle, Pa., showing General Smith's headquarters, and the barracks destroyed by General W. H. F. Lee."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Smith's Headquarters

"Carlisle, Pa., showing General Smith's headquarters, and the barracks destroyed by General W. H. F.…

The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania, was the second battle in Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign of the American Civil War.

Spotsylvania Courthouse

The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania,…

"The operations near Washington, scene of the fight in front of Fort Stevens, July 12th-13th, 1864. When news of the Confederate invasion reached Grant he sent up to City Point the old Sixth Corps, that had so long battled under Sedgwick, whence they embarked for Washington. They went perhaps enjoying the scare of the Washington people, little suspecting that they were to have a brilliant little battle of their own under the eyes of the President. About six o'clock on the 12th the Confederates showed themselves coming down a declivity on both sides of Seventh Street road (Brookville Turnpike) into a little valley running across the road about a mile north of Fort Stevens. General Wright ordered a small brigade of infantry to clear out the enemy from his front. The dwelling on the hill opposite, shelter for sharpshooters, were preliminarily emptied by shells, which set them on fire- shells sent from Forts Massachusetts and Slocum. Then the Federal infantry rose, and, with a fanlike spreading to the right and left, dashed with hurrahs of delight at the two positions on each side of the Seventh Street road. The Confederates slid out of their rifle pits and leaped from behind their fences and trees, and raced. They did not stand a moment. A regiment of cavalry issued from a wood, seemingly Blair's, to the succor of their flying infantry and sharpshooters. The Federals halted to receive the troopers' charge, fired into them at close quarters, checked them, fired again, and kept firing. In three minutes neither Confederate cavalry nor infantry was in sight. The Federals double-quicked in line of battle over the crest of the heights, and disappeared in pursuit, with hurrahs and laughter, on the other wise, driving Rodes's and Gordon's divisions of Ewell's corps in headlong flight before them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Stevens

"The operations near Washington, scene of the fight in front of Fort Stevens, July 12th-13th, 1864.…

"The stone wall at Frederickburg."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Stone Wall

"The stone wall at Frederickburg."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

"Reconnoissance of the Confederate poistion at Strasburg, VA., by a detachment of cavalry under General Bayard, previous to its occupation by General Fremont." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg

"Reconnoissance of the Confederate poistion at Strasburg, VA., by a detachment of cavalry under General…

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General Banks, March 25th, 1862.  Towns which had hitherto remained buried in obscurity and pleasant foilage were suddenly converted into places of national importance. Strasburg, through whose rural streets the resounding tramp of two hostile armies had passed, was a post village of Shenandoah County, Va., on the north fork of Shenandoah River and on the Manassas Gap Railroad, eighteen miles southwest of Winchester. It had three churches and a population of about eight hundred persons. It was occupied by General Banks's division of th Federal army immediately after the battle of Winchester." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General…

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General Banks, March 25th, 1862.  Towns which had hitherto remained buried in obscurity and pleasant foilage were suddenly converted into places of national importance. Strasburg, through whose rural streets the resounding tramp of two hostile armies had passed, was a post village of Shenandoah County, Va., on the north fork of Shenandoah River and on the Manassas Gap Railroad, eighteen miles southwest of Winchester. It had three churches and a population of about eight hundred persons. It was occupied by General Banks's division of th Federal army immediately after the battle of Winchester." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General…

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General Banks, March 25th, 1862.  Towns which had hitherto remained buried in obscurity and pleasant foilage were suddenly converted into places of national importance. Strasburg, through whose rural streets the resounding tramp of two hostile armies had passed, was a post village of Shenandoah County, Va., on the north fork of Shenandoah River and on the Manassas Gap Railroad, eighteen miles southwest of Winchester. It had three churches and a population of about eight hundred persons. It was occupied by General Banks's division of th Federal army immediately after the battle of Winchester." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg

"View of the town of Strasburg, valley of the Shenandoah, occupied by the Federal forces under General…

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates. This exciting pursuit commenced on Saturday, May 31st, 1862, when the first collision occurred between the hostile armies in the lower valley, near Strasburg, to which place Jackson had fallen back from the Potomac upon hearing that Fremont was on the march to intercept him. In this retreat the indomitable and daring Ashby, the "Murat of the Confederates," occupied the post of danger, dashing against the Federal troops whenever they pressed the retreating enemy too closely. At ten o'clock on the 31st the First Jersey Cavalry, led by the gallant Wyndham, and Ashby's men had a desperate skirmish, in which the Confederates were driven back with some loss. Jackson rested his Confederate troops in Strasburg this night, and next morning resumed his retreat, when the Ashby cavalry and the First Jersey had another and heavier conflict, in which artillery was used. That night the enemy occupied Woodstock, having made fourteen miles in their retreat this day. So close was the Federal advance on the Confederates that General Bayard's cavalry, when they entered Strasburg, captured the Confederate provost marshal and two hundred men. At the village of Edinburgh, five miles from Woodstock, the Confederate General Ashby, by Jackson's orders, after seeing the rear guard safely across the bridge over Stony Creek, fired the wooden structure, and it was soon enveloped in flames." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg woods

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates.…

"A sutler's store, Harper's Ferry, Va. The sutler's store at Harper's Ferry represents one of those apparently inevitable evils which attend even the best-arranged armies. The negligence and delay of the government in settling with the troops rendered the sutler's a necessary evil, which a more regular course would have obviated. As a study of human life, a sutler's store is full of the most sorrowful reflections, and demands the most earnest care of the superior officers. A little pure stimulant, when administered with the rations, is capable of warding off many ills which flesh is heir to, more especially when under the prostration of fatigue or privation." —Leslie, 1896

Sutler's store

"A sutler's store, Harper's Ferry, Va. The sutler's store at Harper's Ferry represents one of those…

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

The prison at Millen

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

"View of New Berne, N. C., from the interior of Fort Thompson after its capture by the Federal forces- burning of Rosin Works, railway bridge and naval stores, and showing vessels sunk in the channel of the Neuse River, to prevent the approach of Federal gunboats. Captain Rowan, in his account of the doings of his gunboats, after modestly narrating the important services he rendered General Burnside the day previous in the debarkation of the land forces, thus recounts his own separate share of the expedition to New Berne: "At 6:30 A.M. on Friday, April 14th, 1862, the fleet steadily moved up and gradually closed in toward the batteries. The lower fortification was discovered to have been abandoned by the enemy. A boat was dispatched to it, and the Stars and Stripes planted on the ramparts. As we advanced the upper batteries opened fire upon us. The fire was returned with effect, the magazine of one exploding. Having proceeded in an extended line as far as the obstructions in the river would permit, the signal was made to follow movements of the flagship, and the whole fleet advanced in order, concentating our fire on Fort Thompson, mounting 13 guns, on which rested the enemy's land defenses. The army having with great gallantry driven them out of these defenses, the fort was abandoned."" —Leslie, 1896

Fort Thompson

"View of New Berne, N. C., from the interior of Fort Thompson after its capture by the Federal forces-…

"Thoroughfare Gap, Va., a pass in the mountains on the Manassas Gap Railroad, near Strasburg, held by General Geary. This famous natural break in that part of the mountain ridge called Bull Run Mountain is about nine miles northeast of Warrenton, forty-seven miles southwest of Washington, and one hundred and twenty-four miles from Richmond. The western side is of granite, covered with soil, on which trees grow up to the summit. On the east side is the Gap, which has been called the Virginia Thermopylae, since a few determined men might hold it against thousands. This splendid defense caught the eye of General Geary, and had there been a necessity to act on the defensive he had resolved there to make his stand. The rocks lie scattered around in such wild confusion as to suggest the idea of being the result of some convulsion of nature. Near the Gap is a spring, issuing from under an immense rock, of the purest and coldest water, which is neither increased nor diminished in any season. It stands on the roadside, and is called by travelers 'The Diamond Spring in Palestine.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Thoroughfare Gap

"Thoroughfare Gap, Va., a pass in the mountains on the Manassas Gap Railroad, near Strasburg, held by…

"Tuscumbia, Ala., one of the scenes of Colonel Grierson's exploits."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Tuscumbia

"Tuscumbia, Ala., one of the scenes of Colonel Grierson's exploits."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"View from the interior of Fort Walker, Hilton Head, S. C. looking inland, showing the defenses from the land side. We have given so full a description of this fort that we have now merely to add that our view was taken inside the fortification, looking to the interior of Hilton Head Island. Fort Walker was nearly surrounded on its land side by the Federal camp, which had been strengthened by earthworks extending across the island. Camp Sherman was, therefore, protected by Scull's Creek on the west, Fort Welles (lately called Fort Walker) on the north, the Atlantic on the east, and by this intrenchment on the south."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Walker

"View from the interior of Fort Walker, Hilton Head, S. C. looking inland, showing the defenses from…

"Reconnoissance of Warsaw Sound, December 5th, 1861, by a detachment of gunboats under Captain Rodgers, Savannah in the distance." —Leslie, 1896

Warsow Sound

"Reconnoissance of Warsaw Sound, December 5th, 1861, by a detachment of gunboats under Captain Rodgers,…

"Water Battery at Fort Morgan, in Mobile Bay, Alabama."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Water Battery

"Water Battery at Fort Morgan, in Mobile Bay, Alabama."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Waterhouse's Battery, Sherman's Corps, before Vicksburg. The interior view of Waterhouse's battery, in Tuttle's division, shows the guns in position and the huts in which the men are crowded. These were built of canes tied together and covered with branches, the soldiers resorting to the style of dwelling of the Indians who dwelt there two centuries ago."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Waterhouse's Battery

"Waterhouse's Battery, Sherman's Corps, before Vicksburg. The interior view of Waterhouse's battery,…