The 1763-1788 American Revolution Places ClipArt gallery provides 301 illustrations of the Apollo Room, Carpenter's Hall, Concord, Faneuil Hall, Mount Vernon, the Old South Meeting House, and other locations associated with the American War for Independence.

Head-quarters of Agnew and Erskine. This house is on the south bank of Still River, at the north end of the main street. It was built by Benjamind Knapp, in 1770, and was owned by him at the time of the invasion. His birth-place is also standing, on the north side of the river. They were among the few houses not burned. At the bridge seen on the right the British planted a cannon, and kept a strong guard there until their departure. This house is now (1848) owned by Noah Knapp.

Agnew and Erskine

Head-quarters of Agnew and Erskine. This house is on the south bank of Still River, at the north end…

"The Alden Tavern."—Lossing, 1851

Alden Tavern

"The Alden Tavern."—Lossing, 1851

"View of the place where Andre was captured."—Lossing, 1851

Andre captured

"View of the place where Andre was captured."—Lossing, 1851

"The Apollo Room. The room used for public meetings is in the rear building of the old Raleigh tavern at Williamsburg, and up to the day of my visit it had remained unaltered. Carpenters were then at work remodeling its style, for the purpose of making it a ball-room; and now, I suppose, that apartment, hallowed by so many associations connected with our war for independence, has scarcely an original feature left. Had my visit been deferred a day longer, the style of the room could never have been portrayed. Neat wainscoting of Virginia pine ornamented the sides below and partly between the windows, and over the fire-place, which was spacious. This view is from the entrance door from the front portion of the building. On the left were two large windows; on the right were two windows and a door; and on each side of the fire-place was a door opening into small passage ways, from the exterior. Through the door on the left is seen a flight of stairs leading to the dormitory. The walls were whitewashed, and the wood-work painted a lead color. In this room the leading patriots of Virginia, including Washington, held many secret caucuses, and planned many schemes for the overthrow of royal rule in the colonies. The sound of the hammer and saw engaged in the work of change seemed to me like actual desecration; for the Raleigh tavern, and the Apollo room are to Virginia, relatively, what Faneuil Hall is to Massachusetts."—Lossing, 1851

Apollo Room

"The Apollo Room. The room used for public meetings is in the rear building of the old Raleigh tavern…

"Birth-place of Benedict Arnold."—Lossing, 1851

Arnold birth-place

"Birth-place of Benedict Arnold."—Lossing, 1851

"View of the landing-place of Arnold. This sketch is from the west side of the cove in which the troops under Arnold landed. In the distance, on the extreme right, is the point where the division under Eyre debarked, and near the center is seen the monument on Groton Hill, near Fort Griswold. The shores of the cove are sandy, but the projections which form them are bold promontories of granite rock."—Lossing, 1851

Arnold landing-place

"View of the landing-place of Arnold. This sketch is from the west side of the cove in which the troops…

Place where Arnold was wounded. This view is in a narrow alley near the north end of <em>Sault au Matelot</em> Street, in the rear of St. Paul's Street. At the time in question St. Paul's Street did not exist, and the water, at high tide, came nearly up to the precipice. The first barrier and battery extended from the jutting rock seen in the picture, to the water. The present alley was then the beach. The circular wall on top of the rock is a part of the grand battery, one of the most formidable and commanding defenses in the world.

Arnold wounded

Place where Arnold was wounded. This view is in a narrow alley near the north end of Sault au Matelot

Scene of Arnold's naval battle. This sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat just after leaving Port Jackson. On the left is a point of the main land, and on the right is seen a portion of Valcour's Island. The high ground in the extreme distance, on the left, is Cumberland Head, and that dimly seen in the center of the picture is the Vermont store.

Arnold's Battle

Scene of Arnold's naval battle. This sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat just after…

"Arnold's head-quarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Arnold's head-quarters

"Arnold's head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

Arnold's residence. Arnold lived in Water Street, near the ship-yard. The house is still standing (1848), on the left side of the street going toward the water. It is a handsome frame building, embowered in shrubbery. In the garret of the ho7use the sign was found recently which hung over the door of Arnold's store, in Water Street. It was black, with white letters, and painted precisely alike on both sides.

Arnold's residence

Arnold's residence. Arnold lived in Water Street, near the ship-yard. The house is still standing (1848),…

"Colonel Barrett's House. This sketch is from the road leading to the village of Concord by the way of the North Bridge. The home was erected about eighty yeras ago, by Colonel Barrett, and is now owned by his kinsman, Prescott Barrett."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Barrett's House

"Colonel Barrett's House. This sketch is from the road leading to the village of Concord by the way…

This view is taken from near the house of Mr. Neilson, looking northwest. In the foreground, on the right, are seen the remains of the intrenchments which here crossed the road from Fort Neilson, the fortified long barn. The light field in the distance, toward the right of the picture, with a small house within it, is the ld clearing called 'Freeman's Farm.'

Battle-ground

This view is taken from near the house of Mr. Neilson, looking northwest. In the foreground, on the…

Battleground near Fort Anne. This sketch was taken from the rail-road, looking north. The forest upon the left is the 'thick wood' of the Revolution, but on the right cultivated fields have taken the place of the forest to a considerable extent. On the right is seen the Champlain Canal, here occupying the bed of Wood Creek. The fence on the left indicates the place of the public road between Fort Anne and Whitehall. When this sketch was made (1848) the rail-road was unfinished.

Battleground near Fort Anne

Battleground near Fort Anne. This sketch was taken from the rail-road, looking north. The forest upon…

"View at Bauffet's Point."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Bauffet's Point

"View at Bauffet's Point."—Lossing, 1851

Beloeil Mountain, this sketch is taken from the southeast angle of old Fort chambly, showing the rapids in the forground. The mountain is twenty miles distant, near the Sorel. On the highest point of the range the Bishop of Nancy, a French prelate, erected a huge cross in 1843, the pedestal of which was sufficiently large to form a chapel capable of containing fifty persons. In November, 1847, during a severe thundergust, the lightning and wind completely emolished the cross, but spared the pedestal, and that, being white, may be seen at a great distance.

Beloeil Mountain

Beloeil Mountain, this sketch is taken from the southeast angle of old Fort chambly, showing the rapids…

The Bennington battle-ground. This view is from the hill on the southwest bank of the Walloomscoick, a little west of the road from the bridge to Starkville, looking northeast. The road over this hill existed at the time of the battle. The river, which here makes a sudden bend, is seen at two points- near the cattle, and at the bridge, in the distance, on the right. The house on the left, near the bridge, is Mr. Barnet's, and the road that crosses the center of the picture from right to left is the road from Bennington to Van Schaick's or North Hoosick. It passes along the river flat, at the foot of the hills where the battle occurred. The highest point on the distant hills, covered with woods, is the place where the Hessians were intrenched. From that point, along the hills to the left, for about two miles, the conflict was carried on; and upon the slopes, now cultivated, musket-balls and other relics of the battle have been plowed up.

Bennington battle-ground

The Bennington battle-ground. This view is from the hill on the southwest bank of the Walloomscoick,…

"View at Beverly Dock. This view is taken from the Hudson River rail-road, looking north. The dock, covered with cord wood, is seen near the point on the left. It is at the termination of a marsh, near the point of a bold, rocky promontory, through which is a deep rock cutting for the road. The distant hills on the extreme left are on the west side of the Hudson; and through the gorge formed for the road may be seen the military edifices of West Point."—Lossing, 1851

Beverly Dock

"View at Beverly Dock. This view is taken from the Hudson River rail-road, looking north. The dock,…

"Birmingham Meeting-house. This is a view of the southerly front of the meeting-house. The building is very substantially built of stone. Much of it is serpentine, which abounds in that region, and of which several houses are constructed. I was informed that the stains made by the blood of the wounded carried in there at the time of the battle are yet visible on the floor. The Highsite party hold present possession of the house; the Orthodox have built a place of worship near."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Birmingham Meeting-House

"Birmingham Meeting-house. This is a view of the southerly front of the meeting-house. The building…

Bloody Pond. Tradition avers that for many years its waters bore a bloody hue, and it has ever since been called <em>Bloody Pond</em>.

Bloody Pond

Bloody Pond. Tradition avers that for many years its waters bore a bloody hue, and it has ever since…

Bloody Run, a stream which comes leaping in sparkling cascades from the hills, and affords fine trout fishing. It derives its name from the fact that, while the English had possession of the fort in 1759, a party of soldiers from the garrison went out to fish at the place represented in the picture. The hills, now cultivated, were then covered with dense forests, and afforded the Indians excellent ambush. A troop of savages, lying near, sprang silently from their covert upon the fishers, and bore off nine reeking scalps before those who escaped could reach the fort and give the alarm.

Bloody Run

Bloody Run, a stream which comes leaping in sparkling cascades from the hills, and affords fine trout…

"Boone's Fort. This sketch is from a drawing by Colonel Henderson, and published in Collin's <em>Historical Collections of Kentucky</em>, page 417. It was composed of a number of long-houses disposed in the form of an oblong square. Those at each corner, intended particularly for block-houses, were larger and stronger than the others. The length of the fort was about two hundred and fifty feet, and the width about one hundred and fifty feet."—Lossing, 1851

Boone's Fort

"Boone's Fort. This sketch is from a drawing by Colonel Henderson, and published in Collin's Historical

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

Boone's Fort

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

"View of Boston from Dorchester Heights in 1774. This picture is from an English print of the time. Then the principal portion of the town was upon the eastern slope and flats. There were a few houses upon the higher ground in the vicinity of Beacon Hill, around the Common, among which was that of John Hancock. In this picture, Beacon Hill is designated by the pole, which, with its barrel, is noticed in a preceding chapter. The peninsula originally contained about seven hundred acres. The hills have been razed and the earth carried into the water, by which means the peninsula is so enlarged that it now comprises about fourteen hundred acres."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Boston

"View of Boston from Dorchester Heights in 1774. This picture is from an English print of the time.…

"View of the lines on Boston neck."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Boston Neck

"View of the lines on Boston neck."—Lossing, 1851

The home in which General Washington used for his headquarters on the eve of the Battle of Brandywine. He and his generals held a council of war and planned their strategy.

Washington's Headquarters at Brandywine

The home in which General Washington used for his headquarters on the eve of the Battle of Brandywine.…

"The Breakfast Room. This is a view of the room in the Robinson House in which Arnold was at breakfast when he received Colonel Jameson's letter announcing the arrest of Andre. It is preserved in its original style, which is quite antique. The ceiling is low; the heavy beams are bare; the fire-place surrounded with neat panel-work, without a mantel-shelf. The door on the right opens into a small room which Arnold used as an office; the windows on the left open upon the garden and lawn on the south."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Breakfast Room

"The Breakfast Room. This is a view of the room in the Robinson House in which Arnold was at breakfast…

View of the place where the British laid down their arms. The sketch here presented, of the place where the British army surrendered, was made from one of the canal bridges at Schuylerville, looking east-northeast.

British surrender

View of the place where the British laid down their arms. The sketch here presented, of the place where…

"View at the foot of Broadway. General Charles Lee's troops marched to New York."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Broadway

"View at the foot of Broadway. General Charles Lee's troops marched to New York."—Lossing, 1851

"Place where the British crossed the Bronx. This view is from the southeastern side of the Bronx, a little more than half a mile below the rail-way station at White Plains, looking north. The rail-way bridge is seen on the extreme right. Between that and the barn on the left the British ascended. In the field, seen a little to the left of the telegraph posts, toward the center, and the one on the summit beyond, the hottest of the engagement occurred. The latter is on the land of Mr. Cornelius Horton. In a hollow, near a large hickory-tree, on the southwest side of Chatterton's Hill, are the graves of many of the slain."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Bronx

"Place where the British crossed the Bronx. This view is from the southeastern side of the Bronx, a…

"Brower's Mill. This is a view of the old mill of the Revolution, as it appeared when I made the sketch in 1850, before it was destroyed. The view is from the west side of Gowanus Creek, looking southeast. In the extreme distance is seen the 'Yellow Mill' between which and the one in the foreground so many of the patriots perished."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Brower's Mill

"Brower's Mill. This is a view of the old mill of the Revolution, as it appeared when I made the sketch…

The Buckley House. This building stood upon the eastern side of the Green, fronting the church. It was demolished three or four years ago, having stood more than a century and a half. Tryon lodged in the upper room on the right of the main building.

Buckley House

The Buckley House. This building stood upon the eastern side of the Green, fronting the church. It was…

"This picture was drawn by a British engineer a few days after the battle. The view is from the north side of the hill, looking south from the spot occupied by the New Hampshire troops, under Colonel Stark and Colonel Reed. Portions of the rail-fence are to be seen. The Connecticut troops, under Colonel Knowlton, occupied the ground between the three in the centre of the view and the fort. The ground between the tree and the fort, and toward the left of the picture, was thickly strewed with the killed and wounded British soldiers. The Americans retreated past the trees at the right of the picture."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Bunker Hill After the Battle

"This picture was drawn by a British engineer a few days after the battle. The view is from the north…

Burgoyne's encampment on the West Bank of the Hudson, September 20, 1777.

Burgoyne's encampment

Burgoyne's encampment on the West Bank of the Hudson, September 20, 1777.

"Burr's head-quarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Burr's head-quarters

"Burr's head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

The Butler House. John Butler was one of the leading Tories of Tyron county during the whole war of the Revolution.

Butler House

The Butler House. John Butler was one of the leading Tories of Tyron county during the whole war of…

"The view is taken from the American intrenchments on Butt's Hill. he windmill is on Quaker Hill. The hill at the right is Anthony's. The British artillery fired from both hills. Sullivan replied from the ditch in the foreground. The battle was down by the third fence, at the left hand of the view. A small brook winds along near the fence, and in the ravine was a belt of woods, where Greene posted his men."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Butt's Hill, Looking South

"The view is taken from the American intrenchments on Butt's Hill. he windmill is on Quaker Hill. The…

"The view shows the intrenchments in the foreground. The Americans retreated past the houses in the center of the picture."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

View Looking North from Butt's Hill

"The view shows the intrenchments in the foreground. The Americans retreated past the houses in the…

Mansion of Judge Campbell. This pleasant dwelling is upon the northern verge of the town, on the road leading from Cherry Valley to the Mohawk. The sketch was taken from the road.

Campbell Mansion

Mansion of Judge Campbell. This pleasant dwelling is upon the northern verge of the town, on the road…

Cape Diamond, this is a view of the spot where Montgomery was killed. The cliff is Cape Diamond, crowned with the citadel. The street at the foot of it is called Champlain, and is inhabited chiefly by a mixed population of French, Canadians, and Irish. It extends from Mountain Street south almost to Wolfe's Cove. This view is from Champlain Street, a few rods south of <em>Pres de Ville</em>, looking north. High upon the rocks Alfred Hawkins, Esq., of Quebec, has placed a board with this inscription: "Here Major-General Montgomery Fell, December 31st, 1775."

Cape Diamond

Cape Diamond, this is a view of the spot where Montgomery was killed. The cliff is Cape Diamond, crowned…

"The Old Capitol."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Old Capitol

"The Old Capitol."—Lossing, 1851

Carpenter's Hall, where the First Congress met

Carpenter's Hall

Carpenter's Hall, where the First Congress met

An illustration of Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia, where the First Continental Congress assembled.

Outside View of Carpenter's Hall

An illustration of Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia, where the First Continental Congress assembled.

"Carpenters' Hall. This building is constructed of small imported bricks, each alternate one glazed, and darker than the other, giving it a checkered appearance. Many of the old houses of Philadelphia were built of ike materials. It was originally erected for the hall of meeting for the society of house-carpenters of Philadelphia. It stands at the end of an alley leading south from Chestnut Street, between Third and Fourth Streets."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Carpenters' Hall

"Carpenters' Hall. This building is constructed of small imported bricks, each alternate one glazed,…

The Cascades, on St. Ann's Rapids. These rapids are so called from the cirumstance that a village of the same name is near. This was considered by the Canadian voyageurs the place of departure when going from Montreal on fur-trading excursions, as here was the last church upon the island. This fact suggested to Moore the thoughts expressed in the first verse of his <em>Canadian Boat Song</em>.

Cascades

The Cascades, on St. Ann's Rapids. These rapids are so called from the cirumstance that a village of…

"View of the Great Falls of the Catawba. This view is from the west side of the Catawba, looking northeast, toward Lancaster District."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Catawba

"View of the Great Falls of the Catawba. This view is from the west side of the Catawba, looking northeast,…

Caughnawaga church. This old church, now (1848) known as the <em>Fonda Academy</em>, under the management of Rev. Douw Van Olinda, is about half a mile east of the court-house, in the village of Fonda. It is a stone edifice, and was erected in 1763 by voluntary contributions. Sir William Johnson contributed liberally. Its first pastor was Thomas Romayne, who was succeeded in 1795 by Abraham Van Horn, one of the earliest graduates of King's (now Columbia) College, in the city of New York. He was from Kingston, Ulster county, and remained its pastor until 1840. During his ministry he united in marriage 1500 couples. The church was without a bell until he confiscated property of Sir John Johnson was sold in the Revolution, when the <em>dinner-bell</em> of his father was purchased and hung in the steeple. The bell weighs a little more than one hundred pounds, and bears the following inscription: "S. R. William Johnson, baronet, 1774. Made by Miller and Ross, in Eliz. Town."

Caughnawaga Church

Caughnawaga church. This old church, now (1848) known as the Fonda Academy, under the management…

Cedars Rapids, at St. Timothy.

Cedars Rapids

Cedars Rapids, at St. Timothy.

"View at Chad's Ford. This view is from the east bank of the Brandywine, looking southwest. The ford was about ten rods above the present bridge. Its place is indicated in the picture by the hollow in front of the tree on the extreme left. The wooded height seen on the opposite side of the river is the place where Knyphausen's artillery was planted."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Chad's Ford

"View at Chad's Ford. This view is from the east bank of the Brandywine, looking southwest. The ford…

"Charleston in 1780."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Charleston

"Charleston in 1780."—Lossing, 1851

"Charlestown in 1775. No. 1 is Bunker Hill; 2, Breed's Hill; 3, Moulton's Point; 4, a causeway near the Neck, at the foot of Bunker Hill; 5, Charlestown, at the foot of Breed's Hill. Charlestown neck is on the extreme left."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Charlestown

"Charlestown in 1775. No. 1 is Bunker Hill; 2, Breed's Hill; 3, Moulton's Point; 4, a causeway near…

"This picture was drawn by a British engineer at the time of the battle. The view is from Copp's Hill, in Boston, looking north. A British battery on Copp's Hill fired across the water and set the town on fire. The smoke of the battle is seen on the hill behind the town. The wind was south-west, and carried the smoke eastward over the Mystic River."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Burning of Charlestown

"This picture was drawn by a British engineer at the time of the battle. The view is from Copp's Hill,…

"A profile view of the Heights of Charlestown, in the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Heights of Charlestown

"A profile view of the Heights of Charlestown, in the American Revolution."—E. Benjamin Andrews,…

"Chatterton's Hill, from the rail-way station. This is a view of the southeastern side of Chatterton's Hill, from the rail-way station. They crossed the Bronx at a point seen on the extreme right. On the top of the hill, in the edge of the woods on the left, Hamilton's cannons were placed."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Chatterton's Hill

"Chatterton's Hill, from the rail-way station. This is a view of the southeastern side of Chatterton's…

While Washington was inspecting the terrain, seeing where it was best to station his troops, he ran into several light horseman and told him that the British were advancing. Washington rode back to camp to prepare his men. He quickly stationed a couple hundred Continentals and a couple of artillery pieces onto Chatterton Hill, to support the militia. The skirmishers, who had the job of slowing the British advance, retired soon after Washington reinforced Chatterton Hill.

Chatterton's Hill, From the Railway Station

While Washington was inspecting the terrain, seeing where it was best to station his troops, he ran…

"View at the Cherokee Ford. This view is from the east bank of the river. Toward the extreme right is seen the dam, made to supply water-power for the iron-works delineated toward the left of the picture. The fording-place, which crosses a small island in the middle of the steam, is indicated by the slight fall toward the left."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Cherokee Ford

"View at the Cherokee Ford. This view is from the east bank of the river. Toward the extreme right is…

Distant view of Cherry Valley. Cherry Valley derived is name, according to Campbell, from the following circumstance: "Mr. Dunlop [the venerable pastor whose family suffered at the time of the massacre in 1778], engaged in writing some letters, inquired of Mr. Lindesay [the original proprietor of the soil] where he should date them, who proposed the name of a town in Scotland. Mr. Dunlop, pointing to the fine wild cherry-trees and to the valley, replied, 'Let us give our place an appropriate name, and call it Cherry Valley,' which was readily agreed to."

Cherry Valley

Distant view of Cherry Valley. Cherry Valley derived is name, according to Campbell, from the following…

Chimney Point Landing. This view is taken from the green in front of the inn at Chimney Point, looking west-southwest. The first land seen across the lake is Crown Point, with the remaining barracks and other works of the fortress, and the dwellings and outhouses of Mr. Baker, and a resident farmer. Beyond the point is Bulwaggy Bay, a broad, deep estuary much wider than the lake at Chimney Point. Beyond the bay, and rising from its western shore, is a Bulwaggy mountain, varying in perpendicular height from four to nine hundred feet, and distant from the fort between one and two miles. A little to the right of the larger tree on the shore is the site of Fort St. Frederic, and at the edge of the circle on the left, along the same shore, is the locality of the <em>Grenadiers' Battery.</em> The wharf and bridge in the foreground form the steam-boat and ferry landing at Chimney Point.

Chimney Point

Chimney Point Landing. This view is taken from the green in front of the inn at Chimney Point, looking…

Ruins of the Citadel of Fort George.

Citadel

Ruins of the Citadel of Fort George.

"Clark's House, Lexington. This building was standing when I visited Lexington in 1848. It was built by Thomas Hancock, Esq., of Boston, as a parsonage for his father, the Reverend John Hancock, of Lexington, about 130 years ago. Mr. Hancock was a minister at Lexington fifty-two years, and was succeeded by the Reverend Jonas Clark, the occupant of the house at the time of the skirmish at Lexington. Mr. Clark lived in the house fifty-two years. The room in which the two patriots, Samuel Adams and John Hancock, were sleeping on the night before the skirmish at Lexington, is retained in its original condition. The wainscoting is of Carolina pine, and the sides of the room are covered with a heavy paper, with dark figures, pasted upon the boards in rectangular pieces about fourteen inches square. In an adjoining room is one of those ancient fire-places, ornamented with pictorial tiles, so rarely found in New England."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Clark's House

"Clark's House, Lexington. This building was standing when I visited Lexington in 1848. It was built…

Distant view of Compo. This view is from the top of a high hill northeast of the dwelling of Mr. Ebenezer Smith, near Norwalk. Its long sand-bar is seen stretching into the Sound on the right, and over the lowest extemity of the point the shade trees of Fairfield are visible. The water on the left is the mouth of the Saugatuck River, and that in the distance, on the right, is Long Island Sound.

Compo

Distant view of Compo. This view is from the top of a high hill northeast of the dwelling of Mr. Ebenezer…