The Fluid Mechanics ClipArt gallery offers 64 images of the study of fluids, how they move, and how they react to forces on them.

"Suppose the cistern a to be capable of holding one hundred gallons, and into its bottom there be fitted the tube b, bent, as seen in the figure, and capable of containing one gallon. The top of the cistern, and that of the tube, being open, pour water into the tube at c, and it will rise up through the perpendicular bend into the cistern, and if the process be continued, the cistern will be filled by pouring water into the tube. Now it is plain, that the gallon of water in the tube presses against the hundred gallons in the cistern, with a force equal to the pressure of the hundred gallons, otherwise, that in the tube would be forced upwards higher than that in the cistern, whereas, we find that the surfaces of both stand exactly at the same height." —Comstock, 1850

Water Pressure

"Suppose the cistern a to be capable of holding one hundred gallons, and into its bottom there be fitted…

"Suppose a number of vessels, of different shapes and sizes to have a communication between them, by means of a small tube, passing from the one to the other. If, now, one of these vessels be filled with water, or if water be poured into the tube A, all the other vessels will be filled at the same instant, up to the line B C. Therefore, the pressure of the water A, balances that in 1, 2, 3, while the pressure in each of these vessels is equal to that in the other, and so an equilibrium is produced throughout the whole series." —Comstock, 1850

Water Pressure

"Suppose a number of vessels, of different shapes and sizes to have a communication between them, by…

The instrument called the water-level illustrates the principle of equilibrium in vessels communicating with each other.

Water-level

The instrument called the water-level illustrates the principle of equilibrium in vessels communicating…

"Enlarged sectional view of a ripple or train of waves." —Croft 1917

Wave

"Enlarged sectional view of a ripple or train of waves." —Croft 1917