The Miscellaneous Civil War ClipArt gallery includes 167 illustrations of general topic from the American Civil War, fought between the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy).

(1807-1886) Diplomat and member of the House of Representatives. He was able to lobby to keep Britain neutral during the civil war.

Charles Francis Adams

(1807-1886) Diplomat and member of the House of Representatives. He was able to lobby to keep Britain…

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel Beard, in the United States transport steamer <em>Darlington</em>, picking off Confederate sharpshooters concealed in the trees on the banks of the Sapelo River, Ga."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

African American Volunteers

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel…

The Appomattox Campaign (March 29, 1865 &ndash; April 9, 1865) was a series of battles fought in Virginia that culminated in the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and the effective end of the American Civil War.

After Appomattox

The Appomattox Campaign (March 29, 1865 – April 9, 1865) was a series of battles fought in Virginia…

Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This view is southwest. The attack of General Smith was from the ground behind the house on the right.

Attack of the Gunboats at Fort Donelson

Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This…

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering their mules in the Rappahannock. General Pleasonton's cavalry was attended by a very efficient forage brigade, consisting of mules and [African American] riders. Our sketch represents their drivers taking them to water at the river. The hard work these animals will endure is something wonderful, and justifies the high estimation in which they are held in the army." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage train

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg, which was fought on October 21, 1861, in Loudon County, Virginia. It was the second largest battle of the Eastern Theater in 1861. In the center of the sketch is Colonel Edward Dickinson Baker who was killed during the battle.

Battle of Ball's Bluff

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg,…

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg, which was fought on October 21, 1861, in Loudon County, Virginia. It was the second largest battle of the Eastern Theater in 1861.

Battle of Ball's Bluff

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg,…

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle…

"Interior of Battery Gregg, looking toward Wagner."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battery Gregg

"Interior of Battery Gregg, looking toward Wagner."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, near the Relay House, in 1861. The Relay House was a small railroad station about seven miles from Baltimore, on the Northern Central Railroad. It was of small population and trade, but its position elevated it into considerable importance. Immediately after the troubles in Baltimore this position was seized upon, and General Butler made it his headquarters, and by so doing not only held the control of the railrod to Harper's Ferry and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Patapsco River, but threatened the city of Baltimore with a strong military force. The Relay House was romantically situated in a country of exquisite natural beauty. Our sketch shows the battery stationed to command the viaduct, with the Relay House in the distance." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bouquet Battery

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,…

The Battle of Belmont was fought on November 7, 1861 in Mississippi County, Missouri. This battle was the first combat test in the Civil War for General Ulysses S. Grant, the future Union Army general in chief and eventual U.S. president. The sketch shows the Confederate batteries on the bluff and at its base. The steamboats are drawn up against the western shore.

Battle of Belmont

The Battle of Belmont was fought on November 7, 1861 in Mississippi County, Missouri. This battle was…

"Birney's Division Third Corps"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Birney's Division

"Birney's Division Third Corps"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Peace between the Union and the Confederate States of America.

Blue and Gray

Peace between the Union and the Confederate States of America.

John Brown's Fort (the engine house) from John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry. Brown led a group of 21 men in a raid on the Arsenal on October 16, 1859 in order to initiate a slave uprising throughout the South. The raid was unsuccessful but was a catalyst for the Civil War.

John Brown's Fort in Harpers Ferry

John Brown's Fort (the engine house) from John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry. Brown led a group of 21…

"Sherman's 'Bummers' foraging in South Carolina. Our artist sent us with this sketch of 'Bummers Foraging' a graphic account of their <em>modus operandi</em>. He wrote: 'These active and unscrupulous fellows generally started out every morning mounted on very mean horseflesh, and, as a general rule, they always came back very well mounted, with the animals they rode in the morning laden, even to breaking down, with all the good things of this world. In one place in South Carolina they came to a large plantation owned by a leading Confederate named Fitzgerald. Here the Federal soldiers found, buried in various out-of-the-way places, an immense quantity of gold and silver plate, of the aggregate value of over $70,000; here they also found a large quantity of the finest Madeira wine, which had been stowed away in the old gentleman's wine cellar for nearly thirty years. Indeed, as a general thing, it may be said that the brave fellows had plenty of good wine to drink on their memorable march through Georgia and South Carolina.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bummers

"Sherman's 'Bummers' foraging in South Carolina. Our artist sent us with this sketch of 'Bummers Foraging'…

"Soldiers participating in a burlesque dress parade. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burlesque Dress Parade

"Soldiers participating in a burlesque dress parade. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga.,…

Alfred Burnard's house stood two miles below Fredericksburg, near the river. The Englishman's estate was known as Mansfield, which General Franklin used as his headquarters.

Burnard's House

Alfred Burnard's house stood two miles below Fredericksburg, near the river. The Englishman's estate…

"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders. Never had any expedition in the history of the world to pass through a severer ordeal; everything seemed to conspire against it- nature with her storms, and human nature with her villainy. In addition to the warring elements there was the subtle treachery of Northern traitors who deliberately periled the lives of thousands for the sake of gain. Compared to such men as the New York contractors whom the gallant Burnside anathematized in the bitterness of his heart even Judas Isacriot becomes human. Our correspondent wrote that one of the most exciting scenes during this trying crisis was when, off Hatteras, General Burnside sprang up the rigging of the vessel to give his directions." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burnside Expedition

"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders.…

"The Burnside Expedition- melancholy deaths of Colonel J. W. Allen, Surgeon Waller and the Second Mate of the <em>Ann E. Thompson</em>, on January 15th, 1862, near Hatteras Inlet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Burnside Expedition

"The Burnside Expedition- melancholy deaths of Colonel J. W. Allen, Surgeon Waller and the Second Mate…

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During the Battle of Antietam of the Civil War, the bridge played a key role in September of 1862 when a small number of Confederate soldiers from Georgia for several hours held off repeated attempts by elements of the Union Army to take the bridge by force. The Federals seized it but not before the attack was delayed for several hours beyond what Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside had expected. The bridge now bears Burnside's name.

Burnside's Bridge

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During…

"The war in Virginia. Burnside's corps charging the Confederate position on the right of the enemy's line in front of Petersburg. The first line of Confederate works on the right shown in our sketch were carried by Burnside's Corps. The artillery in the foreground is pouring its steady shower of shot and shell on the enemy's line from the breastworks, while the troops are charging through the brush and fallen trees in double line of battle. The fight was in an open, rolling space of ground, skirted by a belt of timber toward the city. Said an officer: 'It was now about five o'clock P.M. We opened our battery at once and commenced shelling the Confederate fort. We kept on firing for about half an hour, when our infantry, Griffin's brigade, made a charge and captured the fort, taking five guns and about two hundred prisoners. We had, we found, dismounted the Confederate gun by our shells.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burnside's Corps

"The war in Virginia. Burnside's corps charging the Confederate position on the right of the enemy's…

The controversial General Benjamin Franklin Butler declares that the African Americans are "contraband of war" during the Civil War.

General Butler Declaring African Americans "Contraband of War"

The controversial General Benjamin Franklin Butler declares that the African Americans are "contraband…

"The war in Virginia. Caissons and horses on the field at Bristoe Station."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

caissons and horses

"The war in Virginia. Caissons and horses on the field at Bristoe Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Siege of Vicksburg- cannon dismounted inside the Confederate works."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Cannon dismounted

"Siege of Vicksburg- cannon dismounted inside the Confederate works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Soldiers playing 'catch the pig.' Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Catching the Pig

"Soldiers playing 'catch the pig.' Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November…

A sketch of a cavalry engagement during the Civil War.

Cavalry Engagement

A sketch of a cavalry engagement during the Civil War.

"Extempore musical and terpischorean entertainment at the United States arsenal, Baton Rouge, La., under the patronage of the Forty-First Massachusetts, the one hundred and Thirty-First New York and the Twenty-Fifth Connecticut Volunteers- contraband children dancing the breakdown. If anything were necessary to show the sensuous nature of music, it would be found in the eagerness with which the contraband race pursued it. The Federals, with that love of fun which ever distinguishes the brave soldier off duty, got up, a few evenings after their arrival at Baton Rouge, an extempore musical and terpsichorean entertainment, in which the darky element was largely and loudly represented. The hall was one of the extensive rooms in the United States Arsenal building, and prominent among the promoters were the Forty-first Massachusetts, One Hundred and Thirty-first New York and the Twenty-fifth Cennecticut Volunteers. One of the features was a breakdown, which was dance, or rather jumped, with great vigor by a couple of contraband juveniles."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Civil War entertainment

"Extempore musical and terpischorean entertainment at the United States arsenal, Baton Rouge, La., under…

"Soldiers climbing up a greased pole. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Climbing Pole

"Soldiers climbing up a greased pole. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November…

This sketch depicts the famous New Cold Harbor where the Battle of Cold Harbor took place. This was the final battle of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign during the American Civil War, is remembered as one of American history's bloodiest battles.

Battle of Cold Harbor

This sketch depicts the famous New Cold Harbor where the Battle of Cold Harbor took place. This was…

Arrival of a Federal Column at a Planter's House in Dixie.

Column Arrival at a Planter's House

Arrival of a Federal Column at a Planter's House in Dixie.

A Confederate soldier

Confederate

A Confederate soldier

"The Confederate army, under early, surprising the Federal forces at Cedar Creek, on the morning of the 19th of October 1864."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Army

"The Confederate army, under early, surprising the Federal forces at Cedar Creek, on the morning of…

"Fredericksburg, Va., and the Confederate batteries and pickets, as seen from Falmouth Heights, headquarters of General Burnside. Our picture of Fredericksburg gives of course but a very small portion of the famous city, in sight of which our great founder was born, the family homestead being about two miles east of Falmouth where the view was taken. Here stood the famous cherry tree which the infant George cut and confessed to when his indignant father questioned him about it. About a mile to the north of the Rappahannock there is a short range of hills, called Falmouth Heights, which gradually slope to a point where the gully commences, in the centre of which runs the stream, which in dry weather is easy fordable."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate batteries

"Fredericksburg, Va., and the Confederate batteries and pickets, as seen from Falmouth Heights, headquarters…

The British ran a blockade of Southern ports with vessels carrying arms, ammunitions, and other supplies to the Confederates.

A Confederate Blockade-Runner

The British ran a blockade of Southern ports with vessels carrying arms, ammunitions, and other supplies…

"Confederate cavalry driving stragglers and skulkers back to their duty at the Battle of Antietam. One of the greatest evils in a volunteer army is the practice of straggling. This decreases under the elevating process of discipline; but all our artists agree in declaring that they have seen nearly one-fourth of a regiment, including officers, dropping off one by one at convenient opportunities. In some cases this may have proceeded from sheer exhaustion, but generally it was for the purpose of cooking their rations, taking a nap, or for shirking a battle. Federal discipline was very lax in this respect, and more stringent regulations were imperatively demanded. The Confederate generals, whom no consideration of humanity ever restrained from making the most cruel examples, treated stragglers without mercy, and hundreds of these miserable men were cut down or shot by their own officers in their attempts to evade the stern necessity of battle. The result was that the Confederate troops very often fought with a desperation unknown in the modern warfare. Our artist, who from a hill at Antietam had a capital view of the field of battle, saw many instances in which some mounted Confederate officers rode amid a body of stragglers and drove them back into the conflict. Our sketch illustrates this peculiar mode of Southern drilling."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate cavalry

"Confederate cavalry driving stragglers and skulkers back to their duty at the Battle of Antietam. One…

"Confederate position near Centreville, Va., at the crossing of the Orange and Alexandria Railway over Bull Run, showing Confederate encampment, fortifications, etc. Our illustration of the Confederate position near Centreville, the scene of the first battle of Bull Run, cannot fail to interest our readers. The advance of the Federal army into Virginia is thus described by our correspondent: 'About noon Generals McClellan and McDowell, with their staffs, and two thousand cavalry for an escort, came up and took the road to Manassas. All along, to the left of the road, was one continuous string of huts, tents and forts, all empty now. The tree-tops bear the evidence of the way the shot and shell flew around. Large limbs were cut off, and tree-tops twisted in a hundred directions, as though struck by lightning."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Position

"Confederate position near Centreville, Va., at the crossing of the Orange and Alexandria Railway over…

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed in bed blankets, pieces of carpeting, etc. The Confederate prisoners who lounged around the fort the day after its surrender presented a state of haggard misery which took all the romance out of rebellion and made it seem the horrible thing it was. The prisoners had the double aspect of wretchedness- that of the countenance and of the garb." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate prisoners

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed…

"Confederate Prisoners brought in after the Battle of Chancellorsville."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Prisoners

"Confederate Prisoners brought in after the Battle of Chancellorsville."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Confederate rams from Charleston Harbor attacking the Federal blockading squadron, January 31st, 1863. Official report of Rear Admiral Dupont: 'About four o'clock on the morning of the 31st of January, during the obscurity of a thick haze, two ironclad gunboats came out of Charleston by the main ship channel, unperceived by the squadron, and commenced a raid upon the blockading fleet. The <em>Mercedita</em> was the first vessel attacked. Captain Stellwagen had gone to his room for a short time, leaving Lieutenant Commanding Abbott on deck, when one of the ironclads suddenly appeared. Her approach was concealed by the haze and mist of the atmosphere. The vessel was immediately hailed and an order given to fire; but the ironclad being close aboard, and lying low in the water, no guns could be brought to bear. A heavy rifle shell was fired from the enemy, which entered the starboard side of the <em>Mercedita</em>, passed through her condenser, the steam drum of her port boiler, and exploded against her port side, blowing a hole in its exit some four or give feet square, killing the gunner, and, by the escape of steam, a number of the men, and rendering her motive power apparently useless. Unable to use his guns, and being at the mercy of the enemy, which was lying alongside on his starboard quarter, all further resistance was deemed hopeless by Captain Stellwagen, and he surrendered.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate rams

"Confederate rams from Charleston Harbor attacking the Federal blockading squadron, January 31st, 1863.…

The Confederate rosette and badge was worn by supporters of the Southern Confederation.

Confederate Rosette and Badge

The Confederate rosette and badge was worn by supporters of the Southern Confederation.

The proposed seal of the Confederate States of America.

Confederate States Seal

The proposed seal of the Confederate States of America.

The seal of the Confederate States.

Confederate States Seal

The seal of the Confederate States.

A Treasury note of the Confederate States.

Confederate Treasury Note

A Treasury note of the Confederate States.

This sketch depicts the Confederates crossing the Potomac during the Maryland Campaign or the Antietam Campaign (September 4-20, 1862). The Maryland Campaign is considered one of the major turning points of the Civil War.

Confederates Crossing the Potomac

This sketch depicts the Confederates crossing the Potomac during the Maryland Campaign or the Antietam…

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel Baker's Regiment, October 21st, 1861. Conrad's Ferry is situated on the Maryland side of the Upper Potomac, about five miles above Edward's Ferry. It was in possession of the Federal troops. It commands a view of Harrison's Island, the scene of so much disaster at the battle of Ball's Bluff, and is immediately opposite to Leesburg Heights, the town of Leesburg being about five miles from the Ferry, on the south side of the Potomac." —Leslie, 1896

Conrad's Ferry

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel…

"A New Year's Day Contraband Ball at Vicksburg, Miss. The [African Americans] preserve all their African fondness for music and dancing, and in the modified form which they have assumed here have given rise to [African American] dancing and melodies in our theatres, a form of amusement which has enriched many."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Contraband Ball

"A New Year's Day Contraband Ball at Vicksburg, Miss. The [African Americans] preserve all their African…

"The war in Virginia- contrabands coming into the Federal camp. The [African American] furnishes, in his various phases of existence, wonderful studies for the artist and philosopher. Never, perhaps, has a race seen such a moment as during the Civil War, when the chains of bondage were breaking from the limbs of 4,000,000 of men. The distant roar of battle was to them a sound of deliverance. With all the uncouth, odd and queer manifestations of joy they prepared to reach the camp of the delivering Yanks. Yoking together most incongruous teams before the farm wagons of their fled masters, with ass and ox and horse, with household gear queerly assorted, with useless truck and little that could rarely serve them, they started for the Promised Land, and might often have been seen coming in as our artist, a most close student of nature, depicted them, with his usual felicity of portraiture."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

contrabands

"The war in Virginia- contrabands coming into the Federal camp. The [African American] furnishes, in…

Slaves on a cotton plantation

Cotton Plantation

Slaves on a cotton plantation

"The army of the Cumberland- Wilder's mounted infantry passing a blockhouse on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad. Among the strange anomalies of the war was the active corps of mounted infantry, of which the portion commanded by Colonel Wilder, and which appears in our engraving passing a blockhouse on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, was the most important. The mounted infantry brigade consisted of Colonel Wilder's regiment, the Seventeenth Indiana, the Seventy-second and Seventy-fifth Indiana, and Ninety-eighth Illinois; they were mounted by Colonel Wilder in order to enable him to cope with Morgan and other Confederate guerrillas. But the step cost the government nothing, his horses and accoutrements being all captured from the enemy."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Cumberland army

"The army of the Cumberland- Wilder's mounted infantry passing a blockhouse on the Nashville and Chattanooga…

Jefferson Davis', the President of the Confederate States of America, first message.

Jefferson Davis's First Message

Jefferson Davis', the President of the Confederate States of America, first message.

Known as "The Daughter of the Confederacy."

Varna Davis

Known as "The Daughter of the Confederacy."

John Adams Dix, of New York, was appointed Secretary of the Treasury. He sent Mr. Jones to New Orleans with an order to Captain Breshwood, commanding the revenue-cutter at that port, to sail to New York. The captain was a secessionist and proposed to turn the vessel over to the Confederates, whereupon Secretary Dix sent this dispatch: "If any man attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot!"

Fac-smile of General John A. Dix's Dispatch

John Adams Dix, of New York, was appointed Secretary of the Treasury. He sent Mr. Jones to New Orleans…

The method of filling the ordered army draft during the Civil War.

The Drafting Wheel

The method of filling the ordered army draft during the Civil War.

"Encampment of Colonel Max Weber's German Turner Rifle Regiment, Twentieth New York Volunteers, at Hampton Creek, Va.- officers' quarters at the summer residence of Ex-President Tyler."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

encampment

"Encampment of Colonel Max Weber's German Turner Rifle Regiment, Twentieth New York Volunteers, at Hampton…

"Maryland and Pennsylvania farmers visiting the battlefield of Antietam, while the Federal troops were burying the dead, Friday, September 19th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Farmers Visiting

"Maryland and Pennsylvania farmers visiting the battlefield of Antietam, while the Federal troops were…

"Federal Cavalry Leaders. Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham making a reconnoissance, near Fredericksburg, Va. Our sketch of Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham makes a truly brilliant group. Having previously given the biography of Generals Pleasonton and Bayard, we need only mention Colonel Wyndham. Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, a well-known English officer, entered the cavalry service of his country at a very early age. He has seen service in the Crimea and India. He became one of Garibaldi's staff in 1859, and was with him all through his campaign around Como and in the Tyrol and Brescia. He also was with him during his famous campaign of 1860, and was present from Magenta to Volturno and Gaeta. At the commencement of the war of the rebellion in 1861, he offered his services to the Federal Government, and was appointed to the colonelcy of the First Regiment of New Jersey cavalry, with which he served with distinction."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal cavalry leaders

"Federal Cavalry Leaders. Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham making a reconnoissance,…

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans, LA., April 19th, 1862. The bombardment of the forts lasted six days, commencing on Friday, April 18th, and practically closing on the 24th, when Flag Officer Farragut passed up with his fleet, Captain Bailey, in the <em>Cayuga</em>, leading. First Division- Captain Bailey commanding: <em>Cayuga, Pensacola, Mississippi, Oneida, Varuna, Katahdin, Kineo, Wissahickon, Portsmouth</em>, towed by <em>J. P. Jackson</em>. Second Division- Flag Officer Farragut commanding: <em>Hartford, Brooklyn, Richmond</em>. Third Division- Captain Bell, commanding: <em>Scioto, Iroquois, Pinola, Itasca, Winona, Kennebec</em>. On Friday, April 25th, at twenty-two minutes past one, this magnificent fleet brought up before the renowned city of New Orleans in battle array. A flag of truce was immediately dispatched by Flag Officer Farragut, demanding an immediate and unconditional surrender." —Leslie, 1896

Federal fleet

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans,…