The Prisons and Punishments ClipArt gallery offers 50 illustrations of jails and other forms of punishment such as the pillory or dunking stool.

"The taking of the Bastile, July 14, 1789. The Parisian mob, not satisfied with the formation of the National Assembly, demanded to be armed in their own defense; and when this was refused, rushed off to seize the store of arms kept in the Hotel des Invalides. Angered by the report that the guns of the old prison of the Bastile were to be trained on the people, they suddenly gathered around its walls and began an attack. This ancient prison had been the scene of many oppressions in the past. Its foul dungeons and the sufferings of those who were confined there had made it an object of popular hatred. During Louis XVI's reign, however, it had fallen into disuse, and it can not be said that at that time it was worse than any other prison. Nevertheless, to the mob it still stood as the symbol of despotism. The governor of the prison surrendered, but the mob murdered him, together with some others, and carried the heads of their victims on pikes through the streets. The few prisoners that were within were set free. Although were was nothing especially heroic about the taking of the Bastile, the event was of great significance, for it seemed to say that a new age had begun. Throughout Europe it was looked upon as a triumph of the people over despotism, and by the liberals of all countries it was hailed with joy."—Colby, 1899

Bastile

"The taking of the Bastile, July 14, 1789. The Parisian mob, not satisfied with the formation of the…

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to Washington after the destruction of that edifice by the infuriated populace on the 14th of July, 1789. This was the beginning of the French Revolution. The Bastille was originally a royal place, built by Charles the Fifth of France in 1369. It was afterward used as a state prison, like the Tower of London, and became the scene of dreadful sufferings and frightful crimes. When the mob gained possession of it in 1789, they took the governor and other officers to the Place de Greve, where they first cut off their hands and then their heads. With the key, La Fayette sent a plaster model of the old building. The model, somewhat defaced from long exposure in the Alexandria museum, is among the collections of the National Institute, while the key retains its ancient position at Mount Vernon. It is of wrought iron, seven inches long. La Fayette, in his letter to Washington which accompanied the key and picture, dated 'Paris, March 17th, 1789,' said, 'Give me leave, my dear general, to present you with a picture of the Bastile, just as it appeared a few days after I had ordered its demolition, with the main key of this fortress of despotism. It is a tribute which I owe as a son to my adopted father; as an aid-de-camp to my general; as a missionary liberty to its patriarch.'"—Lossing, 1851

Bastile Key

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to…

The Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris remembered by the storming of the Bastille in the French Revolution.

Bastille

The Bastille, a fortress-prison in Paris remembered by the storming of the Bastille in the French Revolution.

"And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, and the high captains, and the chief men of Galilee; and when the daughter of Herodias herself came in and danced, she pleased Herod and them that sat at meat with him; and the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee. And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom. And she went out, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? And she said, The head of John the Baptizer. And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou forthwith give me on a platter the head of John the Baptist. And the king was exceeding sorry; but for the sake of his oaths, and of them that sat at meat, he would not reject her. And straightway the king sent forth a soldier of his guard, and commanded to bring his head: and he went and beheaded him in the prison, and brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the damsel; and the damsel gave it to her mother." Mark 6:21-28 ASV
<p>Illustration of John the Baptist about to be beheaded. The daughter of Herodias stands in the background with a platter.

Beheading of John the Baptist

"And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, and the…

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England, as a punishment for scolds. It consisted of an iron frame which went over the head of the offender, and had in front an iron plate which was inserted in the mouth, where it was fixed above the tongue, and kept it perfectly quiet." &mdash; Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Brank

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England,…

"Appearance of the prison pen at Columbia, S. C., on the arrival of Sherman's army."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison Pen at Columbia

"Appearance of the prison pen at Columbia, S. C., on the arrival of Sherman's army."— Frank Leslie,…

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Prison Camp

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

A county courthouse and jail.

Courthouse and Jail

A county courthouse and jail.

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high granite walls dominate this area of the moor.

Dartmoor Prison

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high…

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which common scolds were formerly tied and plunged into water." -Whitney, 1911

Ducking Stool

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which…

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out of the cucking-stool, which was not, as many have supposed, a mere difference of name for the same thing. The cucking-stool of itself did not admit of the ducking of its occupants. It was a simple chair in which the offender was placed, usually before her or his (for the cucking-stool was not so specially for women as the ducking-stool) own door, to be pelted and insulted by the mob." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out…

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." — Chambers'…

An illustration of a guillotine which was a device used to carry out executions by decapitation. Guillotines consist of a tall, vertical frame where a blade is suspended.

Guillotine

An illustration of a guillotine which was a device used to carry out executions by decapitation. Guillotines…

"The guillotine was used during the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. Now that the power of the Girondists was broken, and military successes had strengthened the revolutionary party in control, France entered upon that part of the Revolution known as the Reign of Terror. The characteristic feature of the next few months was the wholesale murder of all persons suspected of hostility toward the Jacobin government or lukewarmness on its behalf. To be sure, the victims enjoyed the show of a judicial trial, but sentence was rendered without regard to justice or the facts of the case and execution followed quickly. The guillotine, named after its inventor, Dr. Guillotin, was a serviceable instrument for disposing quickly of the condemned, and hardly a day passed without seeing a score or more of suspected persons beheaded in the city of Paris alone."&mdash;Colby, 1899

Guillotine

"The guillotine was used during the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. Now that the power of…

"The guillotine is an apparatus for beheading persons at one stroke, adopted by the National Assembly of France during the first Revolution, on the proposals of a Dr. Guillotin, after whom it was named."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Guillotine

"The guillotine is an apparatus for beheading persons at one stroke, adopted by the National Assembly…

Device for beheading during the French Revolution.

Guillotine

Device for beheading during the French Revolution.

The guillotine was a decapitating execution device invented by Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, remembered for its use in the French Revolution.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a decapitating execution device invented by Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, remembered for…

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall upright frame from which a heavy blade is suspended. This blade is raised with a rope and then allowed to drop, severing the victim's head from his or her body. The device is noted for long being the main method of execution in France and, more particularly, for its use during the French Revolution. The guillotine also "became a part of popular culture, celebrated as the people's avenger by supporters of the Revolution and vilified as the preeminent symbol of the Terror by opponents.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall…

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall upright frame from which a blade is suspended. This blade is raised with a rope and then allowed to drop, severing the victim's head from his or her body.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall…

A device used for carrying out executions by decapitation.

The Guillotine

A device used for carrying out executions by decapitation.

A fastening consisting of an iron ring around the wrist, usually connected by a chain with one on the other wrist; a mannacle; used when taking one to jail.

Handcuff

A fastening consisting of an iron ring around the wrist, usually connected by a chain with one on the…

A prison; a place for the confinement of persons arrested for debt or for crime.

Jail

A prison; a place for the confinement of persons arrested for debt or for crime.

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

The Jersey Prison Ship

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is located in Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames a short distance upstream of the Palace of Westminster on the opposite shore. It was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200. The so-called Lollard's Tower, which retains evidence of its use as a prison in the 17th century, dates from 1440.

Lollard Prison, Lambeth Palace

Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is located in Lambeth,…

"Libby Prison, Richmond, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Libby prison

"Libby Prison, Richmond, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The solitary hydrant in Libby prison."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Libby Prison

"The solitary hydrant in Libby prison."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Interior of Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., with prisoners from General Lee's army confined after the surrender. Our sketch represents the interior of Libby Prison filled with Confederate prisoners, among whom were over one hundred of the most desperate criminals in the South, being convicts who were released from jail on condition of serving in the Confederate ranks."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Interior of Libby Prison

"Interior of Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., with prisoners from General Lee's army confined after the…

Libby Prison was a Confederate Prison at Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.

Libby Prison, Richmond

Libby Prison was a Confederate Prison at Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.

"Prison at Little Rock."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Little Rock Prison

"Prison at Little Rock."— Frank Leslie, 1896

An illustration of a man in prison resting his head on arm.

Man in Prison Resting Head

An illustration of a man in prison resting his head on arm.

The gaol was a colonial prison building for York County, Maine and served as a jail from 1719 to 1879.

The Old Jail at York

The gaol was a colonial prison building for York County, Maine and served as a jail from 1719 to 1879.

"Cages of Little Rock Penitentiary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Penitentiary

"Cages of Little Rock Penitentiary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

An illustration of Arkansas State Penitentiary as pictured in 1874. The prisoners housed were the main labor force behind Little Rock's capital building. The capital building was built on the prison grounds.

Arkansas State Penitentiary

An illustration of Arkansas State Penitentiary as pictured in 1874. The prisoners housed were the main…

"And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon him, and a light shined in the prison: and he smote Peter on the side, and raised him up, saying, Arise up quickly. And his chains fell off from his hands." Acts 12:7

Peter Delivered from Prison by an Angel

"And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon him, and a light shined in the prison: and he smote Peter…

A wooden frame designed for the punishment of offenders and criminals. This mode of punishment was formerly of common use in England, but it was abolished there in 1837. It was employed principally for the punishment of those guilty of perjury, forgery, libel, petty larceny, and unjust weights, and for some time it was used in punishing common scolds and brawlers.

Pillory

A wooden frame designed for the punishment of offenders and criminals. This mode of punishment was formerly…

A frame of wood erected on a post or pole, with movable boards resembling those in the stocks, and the holes which were put the head and hands of an offender, which was thus exposed to public derision.

Pillory

A frame of wood erected on a post or pole, with movable boards resembling those in the stocks, and the…

A form of punishment.

Pillory

A form of punishment.

An illustration of a prison.

Prison

An illustration of a prison.

"The humors of a prison- scene in a station-house cell, Washington, D. C., after the appointment of the provost marshall, General Porter, October 1861. After the appointment of General Porter as provost marshal there was a marked improvement in the public thoroughfares of Washington. Till then too many officers imbibed at Willard's and other fashionable bars, while their men drank at the lower grogshops. The result was a saturnalia of drunkenness and military insurbordination which culminated at Bull Run. Our sketch represents the incongruous elements found one early morning the cell of a station house." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Prison

"The humors of a prison- scene in a station-house cell, Washington, D. C., after the appointment of…

The Gratiot Street Prison was an American Civil War prison located in St. Louis, Missouri and was the largest war prison in Missouri. Run by the Union Army, it housed Confederate prisoners-of-war. The prison building was previously a medical school named McDowell's College, which was confiscated by the Union Army and converted to a prison in December 1861. Its official capacity 1,200 but at times it had 2,000 prisoners.

Gratiot Street Prison

The Gratiot Street Prison was an American Civil War prison located in St. Louis, Missouri and was the…

An illustration of a prisoner drilling a hole in the wall of his prison cell.

Prisoner Drilling Hole

An illustration of a prisoner drilling a hole in the wall of his prison cell.

The New Jail was made a Provost Prison during the Revolutionary War and here officers and men of note were confined.

Provost Jail

The New Jail was made a Provost Prison during the Revolutionary War and here officers and men of note…

"A rogue is caught - if him you'd safely find, / Fetter each limb, and then securely bind. / Dealing with slippery man that may do wrong, / Fast bind your bargain, make it sure and strong, / So that the wriggling, twisting he may make / Is vain, the contract strong, he cannot shake."—Barber, 1857

Safe Bind, Safe Find

"A rogue is caught - if him you'd safely find, / Fetter each limb, and then securely bind. / Dealing…

"A Ducking Stool is a chair in which scolding and vixenish wives were formerly securely fastened, to receive the punishment of being ducked in the water."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Ducking Stool

"A Ducking Stool is a chair in which scolding and vixenish wives were formerly securely fastened, to…

Perhaps the worst of all the New York prisons during the American Revolution was the third Sugar House, which occupied the space on Liberty Street.

Sugar House in Liberty Street

Perhaps the worst of all the New York prisons during the American Revolution was the third Sugar House,…

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

The Prison at Millen

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England, on the north bank of the River Thames. The Tower of London is often identified with the White Tower, the original stark square fortress built by William the Conqueror in 1078. However, the tower as a whole is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. The tower's primary function was a fortress, a royal palace, and a prison (particularly for high status and royal prisoners).

Procession to the Tower of London

Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically…

The name Traitors' Gate has been used since the early seventeenth century, prisoners were brought by barge along the Thames, passing under London Bridge, where the heads of recently executed prisoners were displayed on pikes. Anne Boleyn, Sir Thomas More, Queen Catherine Howard, and Anne Boleyn's daughter, Elizabeth I, all entered the Tower by Traitors' Gate.

Traitor's Gate, Tower of London

The name Traitors' Gate has been used since the early seventeenth century, prisoners were brought by…

No prison is big enough for Boss William Tweed.

Boss Tweed is Too Big for Prison

No prison is big enough for Boss William Tweed.

"The Walnut Street Prison. This edifice was erected in 1774, and taken down in 1836. The beautiful new Athenaeum occupies a portion of the ground on Sixth Street, and the remainder is covered by elegant dwellings. It is a singular fact that the architect who constructed it was the first person incarcerated in it. He was a Whig, and, having incurred the displeasure of the British, he was locked up in that prison. The <em>Public Ledger</em> of June 26th, 1837, gives an account of an armorial drawing, representing, in bold relief, a cuirass, casque, gorget, and Roman battle-ax, with radiating spears, which was made upon an arch of one of the second story cells, by Marshall, an English engraver, who was confined there for many years for counterfeiting the notes of the United States Bank. He was the son of the notorious 'Bag and Hatchet Woman,' of St. Giles's, London, who followed the British army in its Continental campaigns, and gathered spoils from the slain and wounded on the field of battle. Those who were dead, were readily plundered, and the wounded as readily dispatched. This woman and son were master-spirits in the purlieus of St. Giles's, among robbers and counterfeiters. The gang were at length betrayed, and the parent and child fled to this country, bringing with them considerable wealth in money and jewels. They lived in splendid style in Philadelphia, riding in a gorgeous cream-colored phaeton, drawn by richly-caparisoned horses, driven tandem. Their means were soon exhausted, when the son married, and commenced business as an engraver. He counterfeited notes of the United States Bank, was detected, and in 1803 was sentenced to eighteen years' confinement and hard labor in the Walnut Street Prison, then the State Penitentiary. While he was in prison, his mother, who had wondered away from Philadelphia in poverty and destitution, was executed in another state for a foul murder and arson."—Lossing, 1851

Walnut Street Prison

"The Walnut Street Prison. This edifice was erected in 1774, and taken down in 1836. The beautiful new…