"Mygale cæmentaria, typical of Araneida. A, female, natural size: At, cheliceræ; IV', pedipalpi; V', VI' maxillary feet; VII', VIII', thoracic feet; Cth, cephalothorax. B, last joint of pedipalpus of male, much magnified."-Whitney, 1902

Araneida

"Mygale cæmentaria, typical of Araneida. A, female, natural size: At, cheliceræ; IV', pedipalpi;…

"Atypus sulzeri. (Vertical line shows natural size.)"-Whitney, 1902.

Atypus

"Atypus sulzeri. (Vertical line shows natural size.)"-Whitney, 1902.

"The Cheese-mite, <em>Acarus domesticus</em>, and others are parasitic upon or beneath the skin of man and other animals." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Cheese-mite

"The Cheese-mite, Acarus domesticus, and others are parasitic upon or beneath the skin of man…

"Some spiders, like the <em>Ctenizae</em>, close the mouth of their subterranean resdence with a most ingeniously-constructed trap-door, which the inhabitant closes with the utmost pertinacity when any attempt is made to invade the privacy of his domicile. Hence these, of which several species are found in the south of Europe and on the shores of the Mediterranean, are generally known as <em>Trap-door spiders</em>." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Garden-spider and trap-door spider

"Some spiders, like the Ctenizae, close the mouth of their subterranean resdence with a most…

"Some, of which the Common Garden Spider, <em>Epeira diadema</em> is an excellent example, construct a beautiful net, composed of stout radiating lines, intersected at tolerably regular intervals by circular filaments." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Garden-spiders

"Some, of which the Common Garden Spider, Epeira diadema is an excellent example, construct…

"The true ticks attach themselves parasitically to the bodies of various mammals, as sheep, oxen, dogs, etc." &mdash; Williams, 1889

Harvest-tick

"The true ticks attach themselves parasitically to the bodies of various mammals, as sheep, oxen, dogs,…

"Of the true mites, the domestic or cheese mite and the itch-mite are examples." &mdash; Williams, 1889

Itch-mite

"Of the true mites, the domestic or cheese mite and the itch-mite are examples." — Williams, 1889

The mandibles of the common garden spider.

Mandible

The mandibles of the common garden spider.

"Of the true mites, the domestic or cheese mite and the itch-mite are examples." &mdash; Williams, 1889

Cheese mite

"Of the true mites, the domestic or cheese mite and the itch-mite are examples." — Williams, 1889

The Flour Mite (Acarus siro) is an arachnid that is a pest of stored grain and flour.

Flour Mite

The Flour Mite (Acarus siro) is an arachnid that is a pest of stored grain and flour.

The cotton rust mite (Tetranychus gloveri) is a spider mite known for causing damage to cotton leaves.

Cotton Rust Mite

The cotton rust mite (Tetranychus gloveri) is a spider mite known for causing damage to cotton leaves.

"The spiders with which we in temperate climates are most acquainted are of small size, but in hot regions there are several species whose extended legs occupy a circle of six or seven inches in diameter. Some of these, belonging to the genus <em>Mygale</em>, found in South America and Mexico, are said to attack young humming-birds, and to climb trees for this purpose." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Mygale

"The spiders with which we in temperate climates are most acquainted are of small size, but in hot regions…

Scorpions are found in warm climates, reaching their greatest size in tropical America and Africa.

Scorpion

Scorpions are found in warm climates, reaching their greatest size in tropical America and Africa.

"This order, sometimes called the <em>Pedipalpi</em>, or <em>feet-feelers</em>, and which derives its name from the Greek <em>polus</em>, many <em>mera</em>, divisions, and <em>somata</em>, bodies, includes two families, the first of which is the <em>Scorpiondae</em>, characterized by their elongated tail-like abdomen, armed at its extremity with a sort of hooked claw, which, when the creatures are in motion, is always carried over the back in a most threatening attitude." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Scorpion

"This order, sometimes called the Pedipalpi, or feet-feelers, and which derives its…

"Diagram of structure of Scopionidae (most of the appendages removed). IV. to XX., fourth to twentieth somite; IV., basis of the pedipalpi or great claws; V., VI., of two succeeding cephalic segments; T, telson of sting; a, mouth; b, alimentary canal; c, anus; d, heart; e, a pulmonary sac; f, line of ventral ganglionated cord; g, cerebroganglia." -Whitney, 1911

Scorpion Diagram

"Diagram of structure of Scopionidae (most of the appendages removed). IV. to XX., fourth to twentieth…

The Black Rock Scorpion (Scorpio (Buthus) Afer), "seen from above. At, the chelicerae, or chelate antennae; the large claws are chelate pedipalpi; Cth, cephalothorax; the first two legs are cephalic appendages, the next two thoracic; Tn, the telson or sting." -Whitney, 1911

Black Rock Scorpion

The Black Rock Scorpion (Scorpio (Buthus) Afer), "seen from above. At, the chelicerae, or chelate antennae;…

A Spider's spinning apparatus is peculiar. A reservoir inside contains gummy matter from which silk is made. It dries as fast as it is drawn out (Hooker, 1882).

Spider

A Spider's spinning apparatus is peculiar. A reservoir inside contains gummy matter from which silk…

Spider, with cocoon attached to spinnerets.

Spider

Spider, with cocoon attached to spinnerets.

A spider.

Spider

A spider.

"Another remarkable member of the Araneidae is the Diving Spider, <em>Argyroneta aquatica</em>, which weaves itself a curious little bell-shaped dwelling at the bottom of the water, to which it retires to devor its prey." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Spider, diving

"Another remarkable member of the Araneidae is the Diving Spider, Argyroneta aquatica, which…

A garden spider (<em>Epetra diadema</em>) and its web.

Garden spider

A garden spider (Epetra diadema) and its web.

A common house spider, <em>tegenaria domestica</em>.

House spider

A common house spider, tegenaria domestica.

The body of a spider consists of two parts, connected by a constricted waist, the unsegmented cephalpthorax and a large, soft, unsegmented abdomen.

Jumping Spider

The body of a spider consists of two parts, connected by a constricted waist, the unsegmented cephalpthorax…

The Golden Silk Spider (Nephila clavipes) is an arachnid species in which the female (above) is much larger than the male (below).

Golden Silk Spider

The Golden Silk Spider (Nephila clavipes) is an arachnid species in which the female (above) is much…

The Tarantula Wolf Spider (Lycosa tarantula) is an arachnid in the Lycosidae family of wolf spiders. f, falces.

Tarantula Wolf Spider

The Tarantula Wolf Spider (Lycosa tarantula) is an arachnid in the Lycosidae family of wolf spiders.…

the spinnerets of the common garden spider that are used to spin webs.

Spinnerets

the spinnerets of the common garden spider that are used to spin webs.

"The most remarkable organs perceptable on the abdomen of the spiders are the <em>spinnerets</em>, by means of which they spin their curious and often beautiful webs, which have attracted the attention and excited the admitation of mankind in all ages. These spinnerets are little teat-like organs, placed close to the extremity of the abdomen, on its lower surface." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Spinnerets of a spider

"The most remarkable organs perceptable on the abdomen of the spiders are the spinnerets, by…

"The most celebrated of the Lycosidae is the Tarantula, <em>Lycosa tarantula</em>, of Southern Europe, whose bite is supposed by the natives of Italy to cause death, unless the patient be relieved by music and violent dancing." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Tarantula

"The most celebrated of the Lycosidae is the Tarantula, Lycosa tarantula, of Southern Europe,…