Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893) was a career United States Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War.

Abner Doubleday

Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893) was a career United States Army officer and…

Richard Stoddert Ewell (February 8, 1817 – January 25, 1872) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Richard Stoddert Ewell

Richard Stoddert Ewell (February 8, 1817 – January 25, 1872) was a career U.S. Army officer and…

"Emmittsburg, Md., Gen. Meade's Army pursuing Gen. Lee."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Meade's Army

"Emmittsburg, Md., Gen. Meade's Army pursuing Gen. Lee."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

Battle of Gettysburg

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

"Battle of Gettysburg, Cemetery Hill during the attack of the Confederates, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863. No attack was made until about half-past three o'clock, when Lee ordered a simultaneous advance against each flank of the Federal army, while demonstrations were being kept up against the centre. The attacks were not, however, made simultaneously, as Lee had intended. Longstreet began by sending Hood's force against Sickles's extreme left, then held by General Ward, of Birney's division, whose three brigades extended their line from the Round Top across the Devil's Den, to and beyond the Peach Orchard, along the Emmittsburg Road. Ward's force was driven back after a bitter contest, and before De Trobriand, who stood next in line, could give him any assistance. Upon turning Ward's left Hood fell upon De Trobriand's flank and rear, leading part of his force between that portion of the field and the Round Top, while McLaws, with Anderson's support, was assaulting De Trobriand's centre. The attack was made with such vigor that Sickles called for re-enforcements, and Burling's brigade of Humphreys's division, as well as the two brigades of Barnes's division, under Tilton and Sweitzer, were therefore sent him. A terrible struggle followed, and the ground was contested bitterly at all points."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Battle of Gettysburg, Cemetery Hill during the attack of the Confederates, Thursday evening, July 2nd,…

"Battle of Gettysburg- charge of the Confederates on Cemetery Hill, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863. The odds against the Federals were great, but in face of heavy losses they fought with a bravery rarely equaled. The Confederates were at last beaten back from the face of the hill, but, passing along the ravines they penetrated between both the Round Tops, thus flanking the Federals. The conflict was renewed more bitterly than before. The Federal ammunition again gave out, but the bayonet was once more made to play such an effective part, that at nightfall the Confederates had entirely withdrawn from Little Round Top. What Warren justly deemed to be, and what really was, at that juncture, the most important position in the field, had thus been successfully maintained, though at a frightful cost of life. While Johnson was operating against Culp's Hill, Early made an attempt to carry Cemetery Hill, after opening upon it with his artillery from Brenner's Hill. He was beaten back and compelled to seek his original position before darkness had fairly set in."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Battle of Gettysburg- charge of the Confederates on Cemetery Hill, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863.…

"Invasion of Pennsylvania- Battle of Gettysburg, Friday, July 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Invasion of Pennsylvania- Battle of Gettysburg, Friday, July 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The Battle of Gettysburg, Friday morning, July 3rd, 1863. In our illustration may be studied the struggle on Friday morning. On the Federal right the battle raged furiously from early dawn. Ewell was determined to advance from the rifle-pits he had taken the night before, and Slocum was equally resolute to recover them. Geary and Birney here met the first assault firmly. For six hours the struggle was desperate on both sides. The Confederates seemed to laugh at death, and again and again charged through the smoke of artillery with shouts that swelled above the uproar. Wheaton's Brigade, of the Sixth, ws hurried up to the rescue, and the Federal line which had been forced back for a moment, again advanced; more troops were pushed forwad, artillery brought up on a gallop, and posted so as to enfilade the hostile ranks. At eleven o'clock the enemy gave it up, and his shattered bleeding battalions fell back in despair."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"The Battle of Gettysburg, Friday morning, July 3rd, 1863. In our illustration may be studied the struggle…

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the battle with the largest number of casualties in the American Civil War.

Where the Battle of Gettysburg Began

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,…

The monument erected to remember the soldiers who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

The Soldiers' Monument at Gettysburg

The monument erected to remember the soldiers who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Little Round Top is the smaller of two rocky hills south of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the site of an unsuccessful assault by Confederate troops against the Union left flank on July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Battleground of Little Round Top

Little Round Top is the smaller of two rocky hills south of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the site…

George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 – November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer involved in coastal construction, including several lighthouses.

George Gordon Meade

George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 – November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer…

George Edward Pickett (January 16, January 25 or January 28, 1825 – July 30, 1875) was a career United States Army officer who became a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

George Edward Pickett

George Edward Pickett (January 16, January 25 or January 28, 1825 – July 30, 1875) was a career…

"General Warren, born in Cold Spring, N. Y., January 8th, 1830, died in Newport, R. I., August 8th, 1882, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1850, and assigned to the Topographical Engineers as brevet second lieutenant. At the beginning of the Civil War he entered active service as lieutenant colonel of the Fifth New York Volunteers, of which regiment he became colonel on August 31st, 1861. His regiment was ordered to Fortress Monroe, and he took part in the battle of Big Bethel. During the remainder of the year he was stationed at Baltimore, where he constructed the fort on Federal Hill. In the spring of 1862 he joined the Army of the Potomac, serving in the Peninsular campaign and at Yorktown. He was given a brigade in the Fifth Army Corps in May, with which he covered the extreme right of the army and took part in the capture of Hanover Courthouse, the pursuit of Confederate cavalry under Stuart, the battle of Gaines's Mill, the affair at Malvern Hill and subsequent battle, and the skirmish at Harrison's Landing. His brigade was then sent to re-enforce General Pope, and he participated in the battle of Manassas, was engaged at Antietam and the battle of Fredericksburg. On September 26th, 1862, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers for his services at Gaines's Mill. On March 3rd, 1863, he was appointed chief of engineers of the Army of the Potomac, and during the Chancellorsville campaign he took part in the action on Orange Pike, the storming of Marye's Heights and the battle of Salem. He continued as chief of engineers under Meade, and was engaged at Gettysburg, where he seized Little Round Top. On August 11th, 1863, he was made major general of volunteers. He participated in the battles of the Wilderness campaign and those around Petersburg. He received the successive brevets in the United States Army up to major general."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Gouverneur K. Warren

"General Warren, born in Cold Spring, N. Y., January 8th, 1830, died in Newport, R. I., August 8th,…