All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in central England, and has been called "perhaps the most imposing architectural memorial of the seventh century yet surviving north of the Alps"

All Saints' Church, Brixworth

All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in…

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the 6th century around c.525 on land given by the king of Gwynedd, Maelgwn Gwynedd. Deiniol is said to have been consecrated as a bishop by Saint David, making him the first Bishop of Bangor. This monastery was sacked in 634 and again in 1073. Nothing of the original building survives.

Bangor Cathedral, Caernarvonshire

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the…

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History of the English People) gained him the title "The father of English history". Bede is regarded as a Doctor of the Church by the Roman Catholic Church, a position of theological significance; he is the only man from Great Britain to achieve this designation.

Bede's Tomb, Durham Cathedral

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum…

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is not a cathedral. Originally a collegiate church, it was not selected as a bishop's seat during the Dissolution of the Monasteries; nevertheless it survived as a parish church, and the chapter house was the only major part of the building to be lost.

Beverly Minster

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is…

Circular and polygonal plans appear in a number of Syrian examples of the early sixth century. Their most striking feature is the inscribing of the circle of polygon in a square which forms the exterior outline, and the use of four niches to fill out the corners. This occurs at Kelat Seman, a small double church, perhaps the tomb and chapel of a martyr; in the cathedral at Bozrah, and in the small domical church of St. George at Ezra. These were probably the prototypes of many Byzantine churches like St. Sergius at Constantinople, and San Vitale at Ravenna.

Cathedral at Bosra

Circular and polygonal plans appear in a number of Syrian examples of the early sixth century. Their…

A French pastor during the Protestant Reformation, who helped develop the system of Christian theology called Calvinism.

John Calvin

A French pastor during the Protestant Reformation, who helped develop the system of Christian theology…

Chapter House and Angel Tower, Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury Cathedral

Chapter House and Angel Tower, Canterbury Cathedral

The cathedral was founded by Augustine in 602 AD and dedicated to St. Saviour. The Cathedral's first Archbishop was St. Augustine of Canterbury, previously abbot of St. Andrew's Benedictine Abbey in Rome. He was sent by Pope Gregory the Great in AD 597 as a missionary to the Anglo-Saxons.

Canterbury Cathedral

The cathedral was founded by Augustine in 602 AD and dedicated to St. Saviour. The Cathedral's first…

Order of friars, characterized by their dark brown robes and white hooded cloaks.

Carmelite

Order of friars, characterized by their dark brown robes and white hooded cloaks.

A Carthusian monk, known for their extreme asceticism.

Carthusian

A Carthusian monk, known for their extreme asceticism.

Norwich Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Norwich in Norfolk, England dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity.

The Cathedral of East Anglia (Norwich)

Norwich Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Norwich in Norfolk, England dedicated to the Holy…

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals". Much of the structure is in the Early English style and is greatly enriched by the deeply sculptural nature of the mouldings and the vitality of the carved capitals in a foliate style known as "stiff leaf". The eastern end has retained much original glass, which is rare in England. The exterior has a splendid Early English façade and a large central tower.

Wells Cathedral, Somerset

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals".…

(742-814) Christian Emperor. Time of rule was known as Carolingian Renaissance during which he built palaces and churches, and promoted Christianity, education, agriculture, the arts, manufacturing and commerce

Charlemagne

(742-814) Christian Emperor. Time of rule was known as Carolingian Renaissance during which he built…

Two priests wearing the garmet.

Chasuble

Two priests wearing the garmet.

Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. The Cathedral was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108.

Chichester Cathedral

Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. The Cathedral was…

"This quaint, rude figure, found in an early Christian tomb in Asia Minor, dates probably from the beginning of the third century. It is the oldest known statue of Christ. He wears the coarse garb of an Oriental peasant; his countenance is gentle and thoughtful; on his broad shoulders rests a lamb."—Webster, 1913

Christ the Good Shepherd

"This quaint, rude figure, found in an early Christian tomb in Asia Minor, dates probably from the beginning…

"More particularly was the new sect of Christians selected as the objects of vengeance. These people had already gained the intense dislike of Rome. The austerity of their manners, the severe tenets of their faith so opposed to the license of paganism, their customs and laws so antagonistic to the usages of the state, all combined to render them odious to the commonwealth."—Ridpath, 1885

Christians Given to the Lions in the Roman Amphitheater

"More particularly was the new sect of Christians selected as the objects of vengeance. These people…

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London. The building originally consisted of a 13th century chancel with chapels to the north and south (c.1325) and a nave and tower built in 1670.

Old Church at Chelsea

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London.…

The Church Mission Society, known as the Church Missionary Society in Australia and New Zealand, is a group of evangelistic societies working with the Anglican Church and other Protestant Christians around the world. Founded in 1799, CMS has attracted upwards of nine thousand men and women to serve as mission partners during its 200-year history. A religious Mission or Mission station is a location for missionary work.

CMS Mission Station, Island of Deshimo, Japan

The Church Mission Society, known as the Church Missionary Society in Australia and New Zealand, is…

Roman emperor, declared Christianity state religion.

Constantine

Roman emperor, declared Christianity state religion.

Emperor of Rome from 306 to 337. He is best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor.

Constantine the Great

Emperor of Rome from 306 to 337. He is best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor.

"The plain rectangular cross, with a view to its enrichment." — Encyclopedia Brittanica, 1893

Cross

"The plain rectangular cross, with a view to its enrichment." — Encyclopedia Brittanica, 1893

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a <abbr title="United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization">UNESCO</abbr> World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral from the Wear

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located at the side of a cart track near to Eyam. After the plague it was moved to its present location.

Eyam Churchyard Cross

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located…

George Fox (July 1624 &ndash; 13 January 1691) was an English Dissenter and a founder of the Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as the Quakers.

George Fox

George Fox (July 1624 – 13 January 1691) was an English Dissenter and a founder of the Religious…

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest wooden church in the world, and probably the oldest wooden building in Europe still standing, albeit only in part, since few sections of its original wooden structure remain. The oak palisade walls are often classified as remnants of a palisade church or a kind of early stave church, dated either to the mid-9th or mid-11th century.

Greenstead Church

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest…

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made a grant of lands to Wilfrid, Bishop of York c.674. Of Wilfrid's Benedictine abbey, which was constructed almost entirely of material salvaged from nearby Roman ruins, the Saxon crypt and apse still remain.

Hexham Abbey

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made…

"Pope Urban II presiding over the council of Clermont in 1095 and calling the Christian people to the first crusade for the deliverance of the Holy Land, after an engraving of the sixteenth century."&mdash;Gordy, 1912

Pope Urban II

"Pope Urban II presiding over the council of Clermont in 1095 and calling the Christian people to the…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Jarrow Church Tower

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The stone is sandstone and came from a quarry on the south side of Lichfield. The walls of the nave lean outwards slightly, due to the weight of stone used in the ceiling vaulting, some 200&ndash;300 tons of which was removed during renovation work to prevent the walls leaning further.

Lichfield Cathedral

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English…

The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish born Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off the west coast of Scotland to Northumbria at the request of King Oswald around <SMALL>AD</SMALL> 635. It became the base for Christian evangelizing in the North of England and also sent a successful mission to Mercia.

Lindisfarne Priory Ruins before 1860

The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish born Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off…

Llandaff Cathedral is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Llandaff (of the Church in Wales), situated in the suburb of Llandaff in the city of Cardiff, the capital of Wales.

Llandaff Cathedral

Llandaff Cathedral is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Llandaff (of the Church in Wales), situated…

Lyminge is a village in southeast Kent, England.

Lyminge Church

Lyminge is a village in southeast Kent, England.

"Maltese Cross." &mdash; Encyclopedia Brittanica, 1893

Maltese Cross

"Maltese Cross." — Encyclopedia Brittanica, 1893

Now known as Mainz Cathedral. Originally St. John's Church, then St. Salvator, consecrated in 911 by Archbishop Hatto I, served as the cathedral for the Bishop of Mainz until the appointment of Willigis as Archbishop of Mainz in 975.

Mayence Cathedral

Now known as Mainz Cathedral. Originally St. John's Church, then St. Salvator, consecrated in 911 by…

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. In 1544, as English armies raged across Scotland and badly damaged the Abbey which was never fully repaired.

Melrose Abbey Ruins

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks,…

In English usage, Minster is an honorific title attached to certain major medieval churches. Most of the best known were cathedrals in the medieval period.

Minster Church, Isle of Sheppey

In English usage, Minster is an honorific title attached to certain major medieval churches. Most of…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Monkwearmouth Church

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

A Christian merchant who introduced Europeans to Central Asia and China.

Marco Polo

A Christian merchant who introduced Europeans to Central Asia and China.

Pope Sixtus V (December 13, 1521 &ndash; August 27, 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope from 1585 to 1590. The subsequent administrative system of the Church owed much to Sixtus V. He limited the College of Cardinals to seventy; and doubled the number of the congregations, and enlarged their functions, assigning to them the principal role in the transaction of business (1588). He regarded the Jesuits with disfavour and suspicion. He meditated radical changes in their constitution, but death prevented the execution of his purpose. In 1589 was begun a revision of the Vulgate, the so-called Editio Sixtina.

Pope Sixtus V

Pope Sixtus V (December 13, 1521 – August 27, 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope…

People have been coming to worship and pray at Ripon for more than 1,350 years. The Cathedral building itself is part of this continuing act of worship, begun in the 7th century when Saint Wilfrid built one of England’s first stone churches on this site, and still renewed every day.

Ripon Cathedral

People have been coming to worship and pray at Ripon for more than 1,350 years. The Cathedral building…

The present building is widely regarded as one of the finest Norman cathedrals in the country, with a particularly fine doorway at its western (main) entrance. The tympanum depicts Christ sitting in glory in the centre, with Justus and Ethelbert flanking him on either side of the doorway.

Rochester Cathedral, West Door

The present building is widely regarded as one of the finest Norman cathedrals in the country, with…

The lighthouse on the Eastern Heights still stands in the grounds of Dover Castle to 80 foot (24 m) high close to its original height, and has been adapted for use as the bell tower of the adjacent castle church of St Mary de Castro.

Roman Lighthouse, and Part of St. Mary's Church, Dover

The lighthouse on the Eastern Heights still stands in the grounds of Dover Castle to 80 foot (24 m)…

A doodad with scepters, a shield, and a crown.

Royal Doodad

A doodad with scepters, a shield, and a crown.

The Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin at Sherborne in the English county of Dorset, is usually called Sherborne Abbey. It has been an Saxon cathedral (705&ndash;1075), a Benedictine abbey (998&ndash;1539) and is now a parish church.

Sherborne Minster

The Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin at Sherborne in the English county of Dorset, is usually called…

A man struggling through a pond while carrying the Bible.

In the Slough of Despond

A man struggling through a pond while carrying the Bible.

The church was originally built by the Saxons around 960, then was adapted by the Normans when William de Braose granted it to the Knights Templar in the 12<sup><small>th</small></sup> century. The church later passed to the Knights Hospitaller in the 15<sup><small>th</small></sup> century.

Sompting Church Tower

The church was originally built by the Saxons around 960, then was adapted by the Normans when William…

This is the only building to survive. It was built c.1365 after its predecessor had been destroyed in the great storm of 1362. Originally the roof was of lower pitch than that of today and covered in lead.

St. Alban's Monastery Gate

This is the only building to survive. It was built c.1365 after its predecessor had been destroyed in…

St Asaph Cathedral, (Welsh: Eglwys Gadeiriol Llanelwy) at St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales, is sometimes claimed to be the smallest Anglican cathedral in Britain.

St. Asaph Cathedral

St Asaph Cathedral, (Welsh: Eglwys Gadeiriol Llanelwy) at St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales, is sometimes…

St. Martin's was the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th Century before Augustine arrived from Rome. Queen Bertha was a Christian when she arrived in England with her Chaplain, Bishop Liudhard, and King Ethelbert, her husband.

St. Martin's Church, Canterbury

St. Martin's was the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th Century before Augustine arrived…

St Pancras Old Church is a Church of England parish church on Pancras Road in North London. It is believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in London and in England.

St. Pancras Church Ruins, Canterbury

St Pancras Old Church is a Church of England parish church on Pancras Road in North London. It is believed…

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The cathedral sits on the edge of London's oldest region, the City, which originated as a Roman trading post along the edge of the River Thames.

St. Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat…

First Lady of the United States of America from 1841 until her death in 1842.

Letitia Christian Tyler

First Lady of the United States of America from 1841 until her death in 1842.

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe. Construction of the cathedral began in 1079 under bishop Walkelin, and on April 8, 1093, in the presence of nearly all the bishops and abbots of England.

Winchester Cathedral

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the…

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern Europe. It is the seat of the Archbishop of York, and cathedral for the Diocese of York, and is run by a Dean and Chapter under the Dean of York. Its formal title is The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St. Peter in York.

West Front of York Minster

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern…

Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf und Pottendorf, Imperial Count of Zinzendorf and Pottendorf, (May 26, 1700 &ndash; May 9, 1760), German religious and social reformer and bishop of the Moravian Church, was born at Dresden. Zinzendorf had a naturally alert and active mind, and an enthusiastic temperament that made his life one of ceaseless planning and executing. Like Martin Luther, he was often carried away by strong and vehement feelings, and he was easily upset both by sorrow and joy. He is commemorated as a hymnwriter and a renewer of the church by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America on their Calendar of Saints on May 9.

Nicolaus Ludwig Zinzendorf

Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf und Pottendorf, Imperial Count of Zinzendorf and Pottendorf, (May 26,…