"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square, so that a wooden stock may be fitted temporarily if the iron stock is damaged, and that its proportions and form have been carefully considered and definately fixed." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Admiralty's Anchor

"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square,…

"Alfred the Great." — Lardner, 1885

Alfred the Great

"Alfred the Great." — Lardner, 1885

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and just below the ring is a transverse piece called the stock, s s; the other extremity is the crown, c, from which branch out two arms or blades, g, in directions nearly at right angles to that of the stock; each arm spreads out into a broad palm or fluke, h, the sharp extremity of which is the peak or bill, k." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Anchor

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and…

An ancient crown/turban.

ancient crown/turban

An ancient crown/turban.

A pile of armor pieces including a helm, spears, and maces.

A Knight's Armor

A pile of armor pieces including a helm, spears, and maces.

"The Municipal Arms of Rome." — Young, 1901

Arms of Rome

"The Municipal Arms of Rome." — Young, 1901

The crown of the Earl and Countess of Arundel, 1487.

Earl and Countess of Arundel

The crown of the Earl and Countess of Arundel, 1487.

"Atef-crown borne by the deity Khnum."-Whitney, 1902.

Atef Crown

"Atef-crown borne by the deity Khnum."-Whitney, 1902.

The Imperial crown of Austria, which greatly resembles the Episcopal mitre.

Imperial Crown of Austria

The Imperial crown of Austria, which greatly resembles the Episcopal mitre.

The royal crown of Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond.

Crown of Lady Margaret Beaufort

The royal crown of Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond.

A bird resting on the ground, near some bones.

Bird

A bird resting on the ground, near some bones.

"fig. 25 - Topography of a Bird. 1, forehead (frons). 2, lore. 3, circumocular region. 4, crown (vertex). 5, eye. 6, hind head (occiput). 7, nape (nucha). 8, hind neck (cervix). 9, side of neck. 10, interscapular region. 11, dorsum, or back proper, including 10. 12, notaeum, or upper part of body proper, including 10, 11, and 13. 13, rump (uropygium). 14, upper tail-coverts. 15, tail. 16, under tail-coverts (crissum). 17, tarsus. 18, abdomen. 19, hind toe (hallux). 20, gastraeum, including 18 and 24. 21, outer and fourth toe. 22, middle and third toe. 23, side of the body. 24, breast (pectus). 25, primaries. 26, secondaries. 27, tertiaries; nos. 25, 26, 27 are all coverts. 28, primary coverts. 29, alula, or bastard wing. 30, greater coverts. 31, median coverts. 32, lesser coverts. 33, the "throat," including 34, 37, 38. 34, jugulum or lower throat. 35, auriculars. 36, malar region. 37, gula, or middle throat. 38, mentum, or chin. 39, angle of commissure, or corner of mouth. 40, ramus of under mandible. 41, side of under mandible. 42, gonys. 43, apex, or tip of bill. 44, tomia, or cutting edges of the bill. 45, culmen, or ridge of upper mandible, corresponding to gonys. 46, side of upper mandible. 47, nostril. 48, passes across the bill a little in front of it base." Elliot Coues, 1884

Topography of a Bird

"fig. 25 - Topography of a Bird. 1, forehead (frons). 2, lore. 3, circumocular region. 4, crown (vertex).…

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in place by two chains, a and b, termed the cat-stopper and shank vainter respectively, each of which is fitted with a long link at one end. A bolt b, about 5 or 6 inches long, is fixed on the side of the cathead, on a hinge at its lower end; it is held in the upright position by another bolt c, which passes through the cathead, and is worked by a lever d; d is provided with a hole at the end for a lanyard, so that two or three men can pull it. This whole arrangement is termed a slip-stopper. A somewhat similar combination of bolts and levers is fitted close tot he bill-board D, e being a short bolt secured at its lower end with a hinge to the ship's side; and f a hooked lever which holds it in its upright position; f has a socket at its inboard end, to which a shifting arm, provided with a lanyard like the lever d, is fitted." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bower Anchor

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in…

Vertical section of canine tooth to illustrate the various parts and structures.

Structure of Canine Tooth

Vertical section of canine tooth to illustrate the various parts and structures.

In some temples the pillars have, in lieu of capital, the face of a goddess, probably of Isis, with a drooping sacerdotal hood, and supporting a temple on the head. This face is repeated on four sides of the circular shaft.

Capital in the Temple at Denderah

In some temples the pillars have, in lieu of capital, the face of a goddess, probably of Isis, with…

The capitals of the columns display an immense variety. The most beautiful have a crater-like form, and appear like the projecting bell of a flower, with leaves standing out from the surface (here). In other instances the pillars are imitations of a palm tree, and have a smooth slender shaft, a neck-moulding of several rings, and then, without any intermediate architectural division, a capital formed of the graceful leaves of the palm.

Capital in the Temple at Edfu

The capitals of the columns display an immense variety. The most beautiful have a crater-like form,…

The capitals of the columns display an immense variety. The most beautiful have a crater-like form, and appear like the projecting bell of a flower, with leaves standing out from the surface. In other instances the pillars are imitations of a palm tree, and have a smooth slender shaft, a neck-moulding of several rings, and then, without any intermediate architectural division, a capital formed of the graceful leaves of the palm (here).

Capital in the Temple at Edfu

The capitals of the columns display an immense variety. The most beautiful have a crater-like form,…

"Argent, a chaplet proper. CHAPLET. An ancient ornament for the head, granted to gallant knights for acts of courtesy. It is frequently borne as a charge in a shield of arms, and always tinted in its natural colours." -Hall, 1862

Chaplet

"Argent, a chaplet proper. CHAPLET. An ancient ornament for the head, granted to gallant knights for…

The capital of a pillar or pilaster which supports an arch; more commonly called impost.

Chaptrel

The capital of a pillar or pilaster which supports an arch; more commonly called impost.

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and the shackle are attached; d is the crown; de and df the arms; gg the palms or flukes; the pee, the bill or the point is the extreme end of the arm beyond the palm; the blade is the part of the arm at the back of the palm; h is the shackle or ring to which the cable is attahed; kl is the stock, placed at right angles to the plane or the arms and shank." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Common Anchor

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and…

The crown of the Prince Consort.

Coronet of the Late Prince Consort

The crown of the Prince Consort.

"A crown, that is, a circular ornament of metal, leaves, or flowers, worn by the ancients round the head or neck, and used as a festive as well as funeral decoration, and as a reward of talent, military or naval prowess, and civil worth." — Smith, 1873 This image shows a Corona Civica.

Corona

"A crown, that is, a circular ornament of metal, leaves, or flowers, worn by the ancients round the…

"A crown, that is, a circular ornament of metal, leaves, or flowers, worn by the ancients round the head or neck, and used as a festive as well as funeral decoration, and as a reward of talent, military or naval prowess, and civil worth." — Smith, 1873 This image shows a Corona Triumphalis.

Corona

"A crown, that is, a circular ornament of metal, leaves, or flowers, worn by the ancients round the…

An illustration of a coronet. A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring. Unlike a crown, a coronet never has arches.

Coronet

An illustration of a coronet. A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring.…

A coronet of an English Duke.

Coronet

A coronet of an English Duke.

A baron's crown.

Coronet

A baron's crown.

"Coronet of the prince of Wales." -Hall, 1862

Crown of the Prince

"Coronet of the prince of Wales." -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of a baron." -Hall, 1862

Baron Coronet

Coronet "of a baron." -Hall, 1862

The official coronet of a European baron.

Baron's Coronet

The official coronet of a European baron.

Coronet "of a duke." -Hall, 1862

Duke Coronet

Coronet "of a duke." -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of a royal duke." -Hall, 1862

Royal Duke Coronet

Coronet "of a royal duke." -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of an earl." -Hall, 1862

Earl Coronet

Coronet "of an earl." -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of a marquis." -Hall, 1862

Marquis Coronet

Coronet "of a marquis." -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of a princess of England" -Hall, 1862

Princess Coronet

Coronet "of a princess of England" -Hall, 1862

Coronet "of a viscount." -Hall, 1862

Viscount Coronet

Coronet "of a viscount." -Hall, 1862

The official coronet of a viscount, a member of the European nobility.

Viscount's Coronet

The official coronet of a viscount, a member of the European nobility.

The true crows are large passerine birds that comprise the genus Corvus in the family Corvidae. Ranging in size from the relatively small pigeon-sized jackdaws (Eurasian and Daurian) to the Common Raven of the Holarctic region and Thick-billed Raven of the highlands of Ethiopia, the 40 or so members of this genus occur on all temperate continents (except South America) and several offshore and oceanic islands (including Hawaii). In the United States, the word "crow" is used to refer to the American Crow.

Crow

The true crows are large passerine birds that comprise the genus Corvus in the family Corvidae. Ranging…

Crown

Crown

Crown

"The crown of William I and his successors was a plain circlet heightened with four spikes having trefoil heads." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown of William I and his successors was a plain circlet heightened with four spikes having trefoil…

"Henry I enriched the plain circlet with gems, and on his great seal the trefoils of his fathers crown assume a form resembling that of fleurs-de-lys." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"Henry I enriched the plain circlet with gems, and on his great seal the trefoils of his fathers crown…

"The effigies of Henry II, Richard I, John, and their queens, show the crown to have made such an advance in the dignity of its aspect." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The effigies of Henry II, Richard I, John, and their queens, show the crown to have made such an advance…

"The crown of Henry III has a plain circlet heightened with trefoils, a slightly raised point intervening between each pair of the leaves." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown of Henry III has a plain circlet heightened with trefoils, a slightly raised point intervening…

"The truly beautiful crown of Edward II as it is represented in his effigy, was formed of four large and as many smaller leaves of a deeply serrated type, rising with graceful curves from the jewelled circlet, and haing eight small flowers alternating with the leaves." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The truly beautiful crown of Edward II as it is represented in his effigy, was formed of four large…

"It would seem from the crown, sculptured with elaborate care upon the head of his effigy at Canterbury, that Henry IV determined to distinguish the accession of a Lancastrian prince by displaying an unprecedented magnificence in the emblem of his sovereignty. The splendidly jewelled circlet of this crown is heightened with eight large and rich leaves, and as many true fleurs-de-lys." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"It would seem from the crown, sculptured with elaborate care upon the head of his effigy at Canterbury,…

"The arched crown in its earliest form was introduced by Henry V.; and, with the arches crosses, which from the time of Henry VI always have been crosses patees, appeared to supersede the earlier foliage upon the circlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The arched crown in its earliest form was introduced by Henry V.; and, with the arches crosses, which…

"Upon his seal as earl of Chester, the same sovereign has the circlet of his open crown heightened with fleurs-de-lys only, alternating with small clusters of pearls." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"Upon his seal as earl of Chester, the same sovereign has the circlet of his open crown heightened with…

"A crown which appears on the great seal of Henry VIII." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"A crown which appears on the great seal of Henry VIII." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"The crown of the Stuart sovereigns, the first kings of Great Britain, James I and Charles I, had four arches, each of the eight semi-arches springing from the alternating crosses and fleurs-de-lys of the circlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown of the Stuart sovereigns, the first kings of Great Britain, James I and Charles I, had four…

"Drawn from the royal achievement of Henry VII, sculptured with great spirit above the south entrance to King's College Chapel, Cambridge, the royal motto is inscribed upon the circlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"Drawn from the royal achievement of Henry VII, sculptured with great spirit above the south entrance…

"The form of the arches shown appear for the first time upon the great seal of Edward VI." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The form of the arches shown appear for the first time upon the great seal of Edward VI." — Encyclopedia…

"The crown made for Charles II and also worn by James II, William III, and Anne, closely resembled an earlier type; and, indeed, it differed only in its proportions from the crown of more recent times." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown made for Charles II and also worn by James II, William III, and Anne, closely resembled an…

"The crown made for Charles II and also worn by James II, William III, and Anne, closely resembled an earlier type; and, indeed, it differed only in its proportions from the crown of more recent times." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown made for Charles II and also worn by James II, William III, and Anne, closely resembled an…

A recent form of the English Crown.

Crown

A recent form of the English Crown.

"The crown made for the coronation of Queen Victoria, has its entire surface completely covered with jewels, its circlet, crosses, fleurs-de-lys, arches, and mound being alike in displaying varieties of the same precious constructive materials." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Crown

"The crown made for the coronation of Queen Victoria, has its entire surface completely covered with…

"Crowns were originally garlands of leaves; and in this form they have probably been used as an ornament for the head by almost every people. they were much used by both the classical nations of joyous and on solemn occasions." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crown

"Crowns were originally garlands of leaves; and in this form they have probably been used as an ornament…

"Crowns were originally garlands of leaves; and in this form they have probably been used as an ornament for the head by almost every people. they were much used by both the classical nations of joyous and on solemn occasions." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crown

"Crowns were originally garlands of leaves; and in this form they have probably been used as an ornament…

A crown.

Crown

A crown.

A royal crown.

Crown

A royal crown.

A medieval crown.

Crown

A medieval crown.

An illustration of a crown and vine doodad.

Crown & Vine Doodad

An illustration of a crown and vine doodad.