"Ægis- Varvakeion Statuette of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

Ægis

"Ægis- Varvakeion Statuette of Athena."-Whitney, 1902

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

Abolla

"A woolen cloak which was probably only a varied form of pallium." — Anthon, 1891

"The act of lying or reclining; specifically, the ancient practice, derived from the Orient, of eating meals in a recumbent position." -Whitney, 1902

Accubation

"The act of lying or reclining; specifically, the ancient practice, derived from the Orient, of eating…

Greek Mythology

Achilles

Greek Mythology

"The Parting of Achilles and Briseis. (Supposed to be from a Greek Painting.)" —D'Anvers, 1895

The Parting of Achilles and Briseis

"The Parting of Achilles and Briseis. (Supposed to be from a Greek Painting.)" —D'Anvers, 1895

"a dart or javelin, smaller and lighter than the long spear, and thrown by means of a thong, or amentum"-Whitney, 1902

Acontium

"a dart or javelin, smaller and lighter than the long spear, and thrown by means of a thong, or amentum"-Whitney,…

"The citadel of a Grecian city, usually the site of the original settlement, and situated on an eminence commanding the surrounding country."-Whitney, 1902

Acropolis

"The citadel of a Grecian city, usually the site of the original settlement, and situated on an eminence…

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

Acropolis restored

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

"Small pedestals placed on the apex or angle of a pediment for the support of a statue or other ornament."-Whitney, 1902

Acroteria

"Small pedestals placed on the apex or angle of a pediment for the support of a statue or other ornament."-Whitney,…

"Aeneas parted from Dido, though she tried every allurement and persuasion to detain him." —Bulfinch, 1897

Dido parting with Aeneas

"Aeneas parted from Dido, though she tried every allurement and persuasion to detain him." —Bulfinch,…

"Aeschines owes the perpetuity of his fame to the fact he was the only rival of Demosthenes. He was five years older than the great orator, being born in 389 B.C. In early life he served as a soldier, then as a public clerk, and afterwards undertook the role of an actor." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Aeschines

"Aeschines owes the perpetuity of his fame to the fact he was the only rival of Demosthenes. He was…

"Italo-Greek vase in the Campana Collection, Louvre Museum."-Whitney, 1902

Affixes

"Italo-Greek vase in the Campana Collection, Louvre Museum."-Whitney, 1902

The Greek akroter serves as an ornamental finish to the apex of a gable. It is painted in the temple of Wingless Victory in Athens, Greece.

Greek Akroter

The Greek akroter serves as an ornamental finish to the apex of a gable. It is painted in the temple…

This Greek akroter is painted in Acropolis, Athens. It serves as the ornamental finish to the apex of a gable.

Greek Akroter

This Greek akroter is painted in Acropolis, Athens. It serves as the ornamental finish to the apex of…

"Besides Sappho, her friend, perhaps lover, Alcaeus is almost the sole representative of the Aeolic school of poetry. He was a noble of Mytilene, the capital of Lesbos. With other nobles he opposed and drove into exile the tyrant of this city." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Alcaeus

"Besides Sappho, her friend, perhaps lover, Alcaeus is almost the sole representative of the Aeolic…

"The first noted public appearance of [Alcibiades] was on the occasion of the coming of the Lacedaemonian ambassadors requesting the surrender of Pylus. He at first violently opposed the petition, and even went so far as to urge the sending of an embassy to Argos to solicit that city to become a member in a new Athenian league. In spite of the earnest efforts of Nicias and of the protests of the Spartan ambassador, Alcibiades, by means of intrigue and bluster, succeeded in this work, and not only Argos, but also Elis and Mantinea, agreed to maintain an alliance with Athens for a hundred years."—Ridpath, 1885

Alcibiades

"The first noted public appearance of [Alcibiades] was on the occasion of the coming of the Lacedaemonian…

An illustration of a coin with depicting the face of Alexander the Great.

Alexander Coin

An illustration of a coin with depicting the face of Alexander the Great.

The Greek king of Macedon.

Alexander the Great

The Greek king of Macedon.

Alexander the Great's head on a silver coin of Lysimachus in 321-281 B.C.

Coin of Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great's head on a silver coin of Lysimachus in 321-281 B.C.

"Coin of Alexander the Great. Alexander, at the time of his father's death, was in his twentieth year, having been born in B.C. 356." — Smith, 1882

Coin of Alexander the Great

"Coin of Alexander the Great. Alexander, at the time of his father's death, was in his twentieth year,…

Leading alphabet of antiquity.  Included is Punic (Western Semitic from Carthage, North Africa - now extinct), Pelasgian (a form of Greek), Phoenician (Northern Semitic language), Ancient Hebraic or Samaritan (an ancient group closely related to Semitics), and Greek.

Alphabet of Antiquity

Leading alphabet of antiquity. Included is Punic (Western Semitic from Carthage, North Africa - now…

Hebrew and Greek Alphabets.

Alphabets

Hebrew and Greek Alphabets.

An illustration of Hebrew, Greek, Phoenician, and English alphabets.

Alphabets

An illustration of Hebrew, Greek, Phoenician, and English alphabets.

"Altars were either square or round. Specimens of both kinds are here given from ancient sculptures." — Anthon, 1891

Altars

"Altars were either square or round. Specimens of both kinds are here given from ancient sculptures."…

"Amphion was the son of Jupiter and Antiope, queen of Thebes. With his twin brother, Zethus he was exposed at birth on Mount Cithaeron, where they grew up among the shepherds not knowing their parentage." —Bulfinch, 1897

Amphion and Zethus

"Amphion was the son of Jupiter and Antiope, queen of Thebes. With his twin brother, Zethus he was exposed…

"Amphitrite was the wife of Neptune." —Bulfinch, 1897

Amphitrite

"Amphitrite was the wife of Neptune." —Bulfinch, 1897

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil or wine.

Amphora

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil…

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil or wine.

Amphora

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil…

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil or wine.

Amphora

Amphoræ are jars with narrow necks and two handles, used by ancient Greeks for transporting oil…

"Jar for carrying wine, <em>Amphora</em>." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Amphora

"Jar for carrying wine, Amphora." — The Delphian Society, 1913

"Greek Amphora, Late Style." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Amphora

"Greek Amphora, Late Style." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"Examples of Greek Head-dresses (Ampyxes)."-Whitney, 1902

Ampyx

"Examples of Greek Head-dresses (Ampyxes)."-Whitney, 1902

"Though Anacreon has been famous as the poet of wine and love, few geniune fragments of his songs have come down to us. Those which pass under his name belong to his Greek imitators in later times. Specimens are given here in relief after the prosing of historians and philosophers." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Anacreon

"Though Anacreon has been famous as the poet of wine and love, few geniune fragments of his songs have…

"Upper fixture from the Parthenon, partly restored."-Whitney, 1902

Antefix

"Upper fixture from the Parthenon, partly restored."-Whitney, 1902

The Greek antefix is found in the lower roof line, in front of the imbrices (overlapping roof tiles). Its located in the Pathenon, Athens.

Greek Antefix

The Greek antefix is found in the lower roof line, in front of the imbrices (overlapping roof tiles).…

"From a Greek vase."-Whitney, 1902

Anthemia

"From a Greek vase."-Whitney, 1902

"From a Greek vase."-Whitney, 1902

Anthemia

"From a Greek vase."-Whitney, 1902

"A molding or frieze ornamented with a series of anthemia, usually in graceful alternation of two forms."-Whitney, 1902

Anthemion-Molding

"A molding or frieze ornamented with a series of anthemia, usually in graceful alternation of two forms."-Whitney,…

"Aphrodite or Venus" &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Aphrodite

"Aphrodite or Venus" —Bulfinch, 1897

Greek <em>aplustria</em>, or stern ornament.

Aplustria

Greek aplustria, or stern ornament.

"Apollo, the principal deity of the Dorians." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Apollo

"Apollo, the principal deity of the Dorians." — Smith, 1882

"Heathen Deities: Apollo"-Willson, 1859.

Apollo

"Heathen Deities: Apollo"-Willson, 1859.

"Apollo was passionately fond of a youth named Hyacinthus. He accompanied him in his sports, carried the nets when he went fishing, led the dogs when he went to hunt, followed him in his excursions in the mountains, and neglected for him his lyre and his arrows." &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Apollo and Hyacinthus

"Apollo was passionately fond of a youth named Hyacinthus. He accompanied him in his sports, carried…

"It was the universal practice of the Greeks to undertake no matter of importance without first asking the advice of the gods; and there were many sacred spots in which the gods were always ready to give an answer to pious worshippers. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi surpassed all the rest in importance, and was regarded with veneration in every part of the Grecian world. In the center of the temple of Delphi there was a small opening in the ground from which it was said that a certain gas or vapour ascended. Whenever the oracle was to be consulted, a virgin priestess called <em>Pythia</em> took her seat upon a tripod which was placed over the chasm." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Tripod of Apollo

"It was the universal practice of the Greeks to undertake no matter of importance without first asking…

An ancient sculpture representing an athlete using a strigil to scrape sweat and dust off his body.

Apoxyomenos

An ancient sculpture representing an athlete using a strigil to scrape sweat and dust off his body.

"Archaistic Bronze Statuette from Verona, in the British Museum, in the imitation of Greek work, of the sixth century B.C."-Whitney, 1902

Archaistic Statuette

"Archaistic Bronze Statuette from Verona, in the British Museum, in the imitation of Greek work, of…

"At that time the only species of navigation known to the Greeks consisted of small boats or canoes hollowed out from trunks of trees, so that when Jason employed Argos to build him a vessel capable of containing fifty men, it was considered a gigantic undertaking." &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Building the Argo

"At that time the only species of navigation known to the Greeks consisted of small boats or canoes…

"Navigation for the purpose of commerce, and the art of writing, are said to have originated with the Phoenicians. On their arrival in Greece, Inachus and his friends founded the city of Argos, at the head of what is now called the Gulf of Napoli, in the Peloponnesus." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Founding of Argos

"Navigation for the purpose of commerce, and the art of writing, are said to have originated with the…

"Now Argus had a hundred eyes in his head, and never went to sleep with more than two at a time, so he kept watch of Io constantly." &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Argus

"Now Argus had a hundred eyes in his head, and never went to sleep with more than two at a time, so…

A stature of Aristophanes, who was a prolific and commonly celebrated playwright of comedy. He is also known as the Father of Comedy.

Aristophanes

A stature of Aristophanes, who was a prolific and commonly celebrated playwright of comedy. He is also…

(384-322 BC) Greek philosopher, scientist, physician

Aristotle

(384-322 BC) Greek philosopher, scientist, physician

"Aristotle was born in 384 B.C., at Stagira, a seaport town of Chalcidice, whence he is frequeently called the Stagirite. At the age of 17, Aristotle, who had then lost both father and mother, repaired to Athens. Plato considered him his best scholar, and called him "the intellect of his school."" — Smith, 1882

Aristotle

"Aristotle was born in 384 B.C., at Stagira, a seaport town of Chalcidice, whence he is frequeently…

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on many subjects, including physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, politics, government, ethics, biology and zoology.

Aristotle

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on…

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on many subjects, including physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, politics, government, ethics, biology and zoology.

Statue of Aristotle

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on…

The Greek judge's chair was made of marble and was found on the site of the Prytaneum, Athens.

Greek Judge's Arm-Chair

The Greek judge's chair was made of marble and was found on the site of the Prytaneum, Athens.

The Greek Priest's chair was made out of marble and was found by the door of the temple of Themis, Athens.

Greek Priest's Arm-Chair

The Greek Priest's chair was made out of marble and was found by the door of the temple of Themis, Athens.

"Jar for unguents, <em>Aryballos</em>." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Aryballos

"Jar for unguents, Aryballos." — The Delphian Society, 1913

This Greek Aryballos is a small spherical shape with a narrow neck. It is used as a perfume vase.

Greek Aryballos

This Greek Aryballos is a small spherical shape with a narrow neck. It is used as a perfume vase.

The temple of Asklepios.

Temple of Asklepios

The temple of Asklepios.

"Pericles, after divorcing a wife with whom he had lived unhappily, took his mistress Aspasia to his house, and dwelt with her till his death on terms of the greatest affection. She was distinguished not only for her beauty, but also for her learning and accomplishments. Her intimacy with Anaxagoras, the celebrated Ionic philosopher, was made a handle for wounding Pericles in his tenderest relations." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Bust of Aspasia

"Pericles, after divorcing a wife with whom he had lived unhappily, took his mistress Aspasia to his…