Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702. On 1 May 1707, under the Acts of Union 1707, England and Scotland were united as a single state, the Kingdom of Great Britain. Anne became its first sovereign, while continuing to hold the separate crown of Queen of Ireland. Anne reigned for twelve years until her death in August 1714.

Queen Anne of Great Britain

Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March…

"The most powerful of the Great Monguls, the last who ruled with energy and effect." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Aurungzebe

"The most powerful of the Great Monguls, the last who ruled with energy and effect." — Chambers'…

President of Venezuela.

Don Guzman Blanco

President of Venezuela.

A Venezuelan military and political leader. He helped lead Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela to independence during his lifetime.

Simón Bolívar

A Venezuelan military and political leader. He helped lead Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru,…

A cartoon of a band instructor and a tuba player.

Cartoon of Band Instructor and Tuba Player

A cartoon of a band instructor and a tuba player.

A military leader followed by his cavalry.

Cavalry

A military leader followed by his cavalry.

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. Charles famously engaged in a struggle for power with the Parliament of England. He was an advocate of the Divine Right of Kings, and many subjects of England feared that he was attempting to gain absolute power. Many of his actions, particularly the levying of taxes without Parliament's consent, caused widespread opposition.

Charles I of England

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from…

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. According to royalists (and retrospective English law), Charles II became king when his father Charles I was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, the climax of the English Civil War. The English Parliament did not proclaim Charles II king at this time, passing a statute making it unlawful, and England entered the period known to history as the English Interregnum. The Parliament of Scotland, on the other hand, proclaimed Charles II King of Scots on 5 February 1649 in Edinburgh. He was crowned King of Scots at Scone on 1 January 1651.

Charles II of England

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland,…

(1836-1915) Appointed lieutenant Governor of Ontario in 1903.

Sir William Mortimer Clark

(1836-1915) Appointed lieutenant Governor of Ontario in 1903.

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 Old Style– 3 September 1658 Old Style) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was one of the commanders of the New Model Army which defeated the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of King Charles I in 1649, Cromwell dominated the short-lived Commonwealth of England, conquered Ireland and Scotland, and ruled as Lord Protector from 1653 until his death in 1658.

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 Old Style– 3 September 1658 Old Style) was an English military…

(1826-1902) Governor of Canada from 1872-1878

Marquis of Dufferin

(1826-1902) Governor of Canada from 1872-1878

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327?) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility in favour of low-born favourites led to constant political unrest and his eventual deposition. Edward is perhaps best remembered for his supposed murder and his alleged homosexuality as well as being the first monarch to establish colleges in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge; he founded Cambridge's King's Hall in 1317 and gave Oxford's Oriel College its royal charter in 1326. Both colleges received the favour of Edward's son, Edward III, who confirmed Oriel's charter in 1327 and refounded King's Hall in 1337.

Edward II

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327?) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307…

(1834-1921) American Catholic leader for over 50 years.

Cardinal Gibbons

(1834-1921) American Catholic leader for over 50 years.

(1851-1917) Governor General of Canada

Earl Albert Henry George Grey

(1851-1917) Governor General of Canada

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the posts of Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1570 Grindal became Archbishop of York, where Puritans were few and coercion would be required mainly for Roman Catholics. His first letter from Cawood to Cecil told that he had not been well received, that the gentry were not "well-affected to godly religion and among the common people many superstitious practices remained."

Archbishop Edmund Grindal

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the…

Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189). Henry was the first of the House of Plantagenet to rule England and was the great-grandson of William the Conqueror. Like his grandfather, Henry I of England, Henry II had an outstanding knowledge of the law. A talented linguist and excellent Latin speaker, he would sit on councils in person whenever possible. His interest in the economy was reflected in his own frugal lifestyle. He dressed casually except when tradition dictated otherwise and ate a sparing diet.

Henry II

Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189). Henry…

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. Despite his long reign, his personal accomplishments were slim and he was a political and military failure. England, however, prospered during his century and his greatest monument is Westminster, which he made the seat of his government and where he expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor.

Henry III

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as…

James II of England and Ireland, James VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) was King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685. He was the last Catholic monarch to reign over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Parliament of England deemed James to have abdicated on 11 December 1688. The Parliament of Scotland on 11 April 1689 declared him to have forfeited the throne. He was replaced not by his Catholic son, James Francis Edward, but by Mary II and William III. William and Mary became joint rulers in 1689. Mary was the eldest daughter of James and a Protestant. William was both his nephew and son-in-law. James II made one serious attempt to recover his crowns, when he landed in Ireland in 1689.

James II of England

James II of England and Ireland, James VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) was…

(1836-1903) Elected to the Canadian House of Commons and in 1903 he was appointed one of the Alaskan boundary Commissioners.

Sir Louis A. Jette

(1836-1903) Elected to the Canadian House of Commons and in 1903 he was appointed one of the Alaskan…

John (24 December 1167 – 19 October 1216) reigned as King of England from 6 April 1199, until his death. John acquired the nicknames of "Lackland" for his lack of an inheritance as the youngest son and for his loss of territory to France, and of "Soft-sword" for his alleged military ineptitude. As a historical figure, John is best known for acquiescing to the nobility and signing Magna Carta, a document that limited his power and that is popularly regarded as an early first step in the evolution of modern democracy.

King John

John (24 December 1167 – 19 October 1216) reigned as King of England from 6 April 1199, until…

This blackboard marker is a tool used to guide blackboard user while drawing horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines.

Blackboard Marker

This blackboard marker is a tool used to guide blackboard user while drawing horizontal, vertical and…

Massasoit Sachem or Ousamequin was the sachem, or leader, of the Pokanoket, and "Massasoit" of the Wampanoag Confederacy.

Massasoit's Lodge

Massasoit Sachem or Ousamequin was the sachem, or leader, of the Pokanoket, and "Massasoit" of the Wampanoag…

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He was known as Richard the Lionheart, or Cœur de Lion, even before his accession, because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior. Richard was a central Christian commander during the Third Crusade, effectively leading the campaign after the departure of Philip Augustus, and scoring considerable victories against his Muslim counterpart, Saladin.

Richard I

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death.…

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

A portrait of Philip H. Sheridan. With his career in the U.S Army, Sheridan rapidly rose to become general in the Civil war. (1831-1888)

Philip H. Sheridan

A portrait of Philip H. Sheridan. With his career in the U.S Army, Sheridan rapidly rose to become general…

(1732-1792) Served with the British army during the French and Indian War. He led troops in the American Revolutionary War.

William Smallwood

(1732-1792) Served with the British army during the French and Indian War. He led troops in the American…

Although he did not explicitly seek the office of commander and even claimed that he was not equal to it, there was no serious competition. Congress created the Continental Army on June 14, 1775; the next day, on the nomination of John Adams of Massachusetts, Washington was appointed Major General and elected by Congress to be Commander-in-chief.

Washington Taking Command of the Army

Although he did not explicitly seek the office of commander and even claimed that he was not equal to…

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen. Whitgift's theological views were often controversial.

Archbishop John Whitgift

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted…

Edward Winslow was a pilgrim and a leader of the Plymouth colony.

Edward Winslow

Edward Winslow was a pilgrim and a leader of the Plymouth colony.