The obverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Écu, Obverse

The obverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

The reverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Écu, Reverse

The reverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic style Christian monastery located in Melrose, Scotland. The Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian Monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland.

Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic style Christian monastery located in Melrose, Scotland. The Abbey was founded…

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England, so are the remains of Melrose Abbey a like monument of the iconoclastic phase of the Reformation in Scotland With the change in doctrines there, the monks of the historic abbey - it was founded in the thirteenth century - were driven out and the beautiful sculptures of the abbey church defaced."—Myers, 1905

Melrose Abbey

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England,…

Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702 until her death in 1714.

Queen Anne of England

Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702 until her death in 1714.

The Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland. She was born on February 6, 1665 and died on August 1, 1714.

Queen Anne of England

The Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland. She was born on February 6, 1665 and died on August 1, 1714.

A symmetrical anticlinal fold, the top of which has been eroded. Near St. Abb's Head, Scotland.

Anticlinal Fold

A symmetrical anticlinal fold, the top of which has been eroded. Near St. Abb's Head, Scotland.

"Bagpipe, a musical wind-instrument of very great antiquity, having been used among the ancient Greeks, and being a favorite instrument over Europe generally in the fifteenth century." -Vaughan, 1906

Highland Bagpipe

"Bagpipe, a musical wind-instrument of very great antiquity, having been used among the ancient Greeks,…

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England, as a punishment for scolds. It consisted of an iron frame which went over the head of the offender, and had in front an iron plate which was inserted in the mouth, where it was fixed above the tongue, and kept it perfectly quiet." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Brank

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England,…

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge over the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, to the east of the Forth Road Bridge, and 14 km (9 miles) west of central Edinburgh. It is often called the Forth Rail Bridge or Forth Railway Bridge to distinguish it from the Forth Road Bridge, but should correctly be referred to as the Forth Bridge. The bridge connects Scotland's capital Edinburgh with the Kingdom of Fife, and acts as a major artery connecting the north-east and south-east of the country. Described as "the one internationally recognised Scottish landmark", it may be nominated by the British government as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The bridge and its associated railway infrastructure is owned by Network Rail Infrastructure Limited.

Forth Bridge

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge over the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, to…

(1759-1796) Scottish poet

Robert Burns

(1759-1796) Scottish poet

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles I

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Charles II

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

Charles II

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

This Celtic stone cross circular panel is found in St. Vigeans, Angus, Scotland.

Celtic Stone Cross Circular Panel

This Celtic stone cross circular panel is found in St. Vigeans, Angus, Scotland.

"Crannoge, the name given in Ireland and in Scotland to the fortified islands in lakes which were in common use as dwelling-places and places of refuge among the Celtic inhavitants. The etymology of the word is uncertain, but it is believed to refer to the timber which was employed either in the fortification of the island, or in the construction of the houses which were placed upon it." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crannoge

"Crannoge, the name given in Ireland and in Scotland to the fortified islands in lakes which were in…

A memorial cross found in Forteviot, Scotland.

Cross

A memorial cross found in Forteviot, Scotland.

"The Skye Terrier came originally from the Isle of Skye in Scotland, where it was kept for destroying foxes."—Finley, 1917

Skye Terrier

"The Skye Terrier came originally from the Isle of Skye in Scotland, where it was kept for destroying…

"A royal and parliamentary burgh and seaport, situated on the east coast of Scotland, in the county of Forfar, on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, twelve miles from the confluence of that estuary with the German Ocean. It is the third town in Scotland as regards to population, and the second in commercial importance." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Dundee

"A royal and parliamentary burgh and seaport, situated on the east coast of Scotland, in the county…

Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Edinburgh

Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Edward I of England.

Edward I

Edward I of England.

In heraldry, an ordinary in the form of St. Andrew's cross, formed by two bends, dexter and sinister, crossing each other.

Saltire Flag

In heraldry, an ordinary in the form of St. Andrew's cross, formed by two bends, dexter and sinister,…

A man playing golf, with his wife and young caddy.

Golfers

A man playing golf, with his wife and young caddy.

A Scottish hotel located in Edinburgh.

Cockburn Hotel

A Scottish hotel located in Edinburgh.

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

The Ruins of Iona

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

James II

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Gardant Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Passant Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Rampant Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century, the king of beasts was assumed as an appropriate emblem by the sovereigns of England, Scotland, Norway, Denmark, the native princes of Wales, the counts of Flanders and Holland, and various other European potentates." — Chambers, 1881

Rampant Regardant Lion

"The lion holds an important place among the animals born in coat-armor. As early as the 12th century,…

A Scottish medical missionary and explorer of Africa.

David Livingstone

A Scottish medical missionary and explorer of Africa.

(1797-1875) Scotch geologist

Sir Charles Lyell

(1797-1875) Scotch geologist

Sir Duncan MacDougall was a Scottish military officer born in 1789.

Sir Duncan MacDougall

Sir Duncan MacDougall was a Scottish military officer born in 1789.

Queen of Scotland. Executed by Queen Elizabeth of England.

Mary Queen of Scots

Queen of Scotland. Executed by Queen Elizabeth of England.

(1542-1587) Queen of Scotland

Mary Queen of Scots

(1542-1587) Queen of Scotland

"The buildings which have been constructed in these various styles differ essentially from those which have been carried out in the same styles in other countries. In churches and other buildings erected in the Gothic style this difference mainly consists in deficiency of strongly marked architectural keeping, for both main and subordinate features are generally irregular. In most cases the whole group is highly unsymmetrical, and the tower is at one corner, by which a picturesque effect is aimed at [shown here]. The material and the mode of construction are generally left visible, and it is endeavoured to utilize them as ornament; and this not only externally but also in the interior, where the beams and rafters of the roof are often left quite bare; they are even thus exposed where their appearance is not in keeping with the destination of the buildings."

Memorial Church in Scotland

"The buildings which have been constructed in these various styles differ essentially from those which…

"Royal Arms of Scotland, previous to the Union." — Chambers, 1881

Royal Arms of Scotland

"Royal Arms of Scotland, previous to the Union." — Chambers, 1881

First used by the Dutch in the 16th and 17th centuries and later refined in North America from the early 18th century. Used for slavery, fishing, and privateering among other things. First schooner made in Scotland in 1713.

Wind-Powered Sailboat

First used by the Dutch in the 16th and 17th centuries and later refined in North America from the early…

Volcanic sills - Salisbury Crag in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Salisbury Crag

Volcanic sills - Salisbury Crag in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The king of Scots bore Gold a lion within a double tressure flowered and counterflowered gules

Scotland

The king of Scots bore Gold a lion within a double tressure flowered and counterflowered gules

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner. St. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner. St. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.

(1771-1832) Scottish novelist

Sir Walter Scott

(1771-1832) Scottish novelist

A Highland sgiath.

Highlands sgiath

A Highland sgiath.

"St. Patrick, or Patricius, is the apostle or patron saint of Ireland; said to have been born near the site of Kilpatrick, Scotland. His zeal prompted him to cross the channel for the conversion of the pagan Irish. His arrival in Ireland took place probably between 440-460. His endeavors were crowned with great success, and he established there a number of schools and monasteries. He died at an advanced age."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Badge of the Order of St. Patrick

"St. Patrick, or Patricius, is the apostle or patron saint of Ireland; said to have been born near the…

Synclinal fold near Banff, Scotland.

Synclinal Fold

Synclinal fold near Banff, Scotland.

"The targe of the Scottish Highlands, composed of wood and leather, and studded with brass decoratively applied, is a reversion to the early circular form."—Finley, 1917

Highland targe

"The targe of the Scottish Highlands, composed of wood and leather, and studded with brass decoratively…

Section in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland showing the overthrust of the Archaean onto the older Palaeozoics.

Thrusts in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland

Section in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland showing the overthrust of the Archaean onto the older…

"Plan of chambered barrow or cairn, at Garrywhin, Caithness. BARROW, a sepulchral mound of earth or stones raised over the site of a burial as a mark of honor to the dead." -Hazeltine, 1894

Tumulus

"Plan of chambered barrow or cairn, at Garrywhin, Caithness. BARROW, a sepulchral mound of earth or…

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish knight, landowner, and patriot who is know for leading a resistance during the Wars of Scottish Independence.

Sir William Wallace

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish knight, landowner, and patriot who is know for leading a resistance…