"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village, capital of Harrison County, is situated on the west fork of the Monongahela River, at the mouth of Elk Creek, about two hundred and twenty miles northwest of Richmond. It is built on a high tableland environed by hills. It had in 1861 several churches, academies, two printing offices and many fine stores. Stove coal abounded in its vicinity. The Northwestern Railroad, a branch of the Baltimore and Ohio, passed through it. It has about two thousand inhabitants. For a short time Clarksburg was the headquarters of General Rosecrans. The situation was briefly this: The Cheat Mountain Gaps, the key to the whole country, were held by a strong force, a portion of General Reynolds's brigade, the remainder of which was stationed at Bevery, Huttonsville, and in that vicinity. Other portions of General Rosecrans's command were scattered over almost the whole northwestern part of Virginia, guarding the railroad lines from Wheeling and Parkersburg down to Grafton, and then eastward through the Cheat River country, Oakland, Altamont, and almost to Cumberland, occupying the Kanawha Valley by General Cox's brigade, and holding towns like Weston, Buckhannon, Summerville, Philippi and Bealington." —Leslie, 1896

Village of Clarksburg

"Village of Clarksburg, Western Virginia, headquarters of General Rosecrans. Clarksburg, a post village,…

A Roman clipeus.

Roman clipeus

A Roman clipeus.

This music trophy clock panel was designed during the French Renaissance. Trophies were tokens of victory that were used to decorate monuments connected with war.

Music Trophy Clock Panel

This music trophy clock panel was designed during the French Renaissance. Trophies were tokens of victory…

This trophy clock panel was designed during the French Renaissance. Trophies were tokens of victory that were used to decorate monuments connected with war.

Trophy Clock Panel

This trophy clock panel was designed during the French Renaissance. Trophies were tokens of victory…

An Indian war club used in battle.

War Club

An Indian war club used in battle.

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's dress, entered the Peloponnesian camp, and provoked a quarrel with a soldier, by whom he was killed." — Goodrich, 1844

Codrus slain

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's…

"Shelling of a Confederate camp on the Potomac by Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island battery. Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island Artillery, observing on the other side of the Potomac a Confederate camp, fixed one of his guns, and after one or two trials got the range so perfectly that they fled in the greatest confusion." —Leslie, 1896

Shelling of Confederate Camp

"Shelling of a Confederate camp on the Potomac by Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island battery.…

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the Federal fleet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Confederate gunboats

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the…

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed in bed blankets, pieces of carpeting, etc. The Confederate prisoners who lounged around the fort the day after its surrender presented a state of haggard misery which took all the romance out of rebellion and made it seem the horrible thing it was. The prisoners had the double aspect of wretchedness- that of the countenance and of the garb." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate prisoners

"Group of Confederate prisoners captured at Fort Donelson, on the morning after the surrender, clothed…

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel Baker's Regiment, October 21st, 1861. Conrad's Ferry is situated on the Maryland side of the Upper Potomac, about five miles above Edward's Ferry. It was in possession of the Federal troops. It commands a view of Harrison's Island, the scene of so much disaster at the battle of Ball's Bluff, and is immediately opposite to Leesburg Heights, the town of Leesburg being about five miles from the Ferry, on the south side of the Potomac." —Leslie, 1896

Conrad's Ferry

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel…

"General Michael Corcoran, born in Carrowkeel, County Sligo, Ireland, September 21st, 1827, died near Fairfax Courthouse, Va., December 22nd 1863. Upon the first call of the President for troops in 1861 Colonel Corcoran led the Sixty-ninth Regiment to the seat of war. It was ordered into Virginia, built Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights, and fought with impetuous valor at the battle of Bull Run. The colonel was wounded and taken prisoner. He was offered his liberty on condition of not again taking up arms against the South, but refused to accept on such terms. An exchange being finally effected, August 15th, 1862, he was released, and commissioned brigadier general, dating from July 21st, 1861. He next organized the Corcoran Legion, which took part in the battles of the Nansemond River and Suffolk during April, 1863. General Corcoran was killed by the falling of his horse upon him." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Michael Corcoran

"General Michael Corcoran, born in Carrowkeel, County Sligo, Ireland, September 21st, 1827, died near…

British general, fought against the Americans in the Revolutionary War.

Lord Charles Cornwallis

British general, fought against the Americans in the Revolutionary War.

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon and Colonel Dumont, after the battle. After the Confederates had crossed the fourth ford General Garnett again endeavored to rally his men, standing waving his hand on an exposed point near the river bank, by his side only one young man (Chaplet), wearing the uniform of the Georgia Sharpshooters. Three of Dumont's men fired at the same time, and Garnett and his companion fell at the first round. The men rushed across, and on turning the body discovered that the Confederate leader of Western Virginia had paid the penalty; he was shot through the heart. Major Gordon, U.S.A., closed his eyes reverently, and Colonel Dumont, coming up, had him carried into a grove close by, where they laid him down, taking care of his sword and watch, to be sent with his body to his family." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Corrick's Ford

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon…

"Blowing up the Confederate forts on Craney Island, by Commodore Goldsborough, June 2nd 1862." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Craney Island

"Blowing up the Confederate forts on Craney Island, by Commodore Goldsborough, June 2nd 1862." —…

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the Maryland Secessionists." —Leslie, 1896

Creek Railroad Bridge

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the…

"General Crook, born near Dayton, O., September 8th, 1828, died in Chicago, Ill., March 21st, 1890, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1852, and was on duty with the Fourth Infantry in California in 1852-'61. He had risen to a captaincy, when, at the beginning of the Civil War, he returned to the East and became colonel of the Thirty-sixth Ohio Infantry. He afterward served in the Western Virginia campaign, in command of the Third Provisional Brigade, from May 1st to August 15th, 1862, and was wounded in the action at Lewisburg. He served in Tennessee in 1863, and on July 1st he was transferred to the command of the Second Cavalry Division. After various actions, ending in the battle of Chickamauga, he pursued Wheeler's Confederate cavalry and defeated it. He entered upon the command of the Kanawha District, in Western Virginia, in February, 1864; made constant raids and was in numerous actions. He took part in Sheridan's Shenandoah campaign, and received the brevet of brigadier general and major general in the United States Army, March 13th, 1865. General Crook had command of the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac from March 26th to April 9th, during which time he was engaged at Dinwiddie Courthouse, Sailor's Creek and Farmville, till the surrender at Appomattox." —Leslie, 1896

General George Crook

"General Crook, born near Dayton, O., September 8th, 1828, died in Chicago, Ill., March 21st, 1890,…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement. We illustrated the opening of this battle on page 159, and now add a sketch of the centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement, described by our correspondent, as follows: "General Melroy had the centre, and pressed steadily forward from the ground where he first took position, planting his guns each time nearer the enemy's batteries. His artillery delivered its fire with a precision truly remarkable. The ground where the enemy's guns were planted was furrowed with our shot and shell as with a plow, and where one battery stood I counted twelve dead horses. General Melroy's infantry deployed through the woods, taking advantage of a deep gully to cross a wheatfield, where they were exposed, and charged gallantly up the hill, where one of the opposing batteries was planted, cutting down the gunners with their fire. Had they been supported they would have captured a battery. They made the crest of the hill too hot to hold on the part of the enemy, and held their position until recalled." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement.…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"Colonel Cross, born in Lancaster, N. H., April 22nd, 1832, died near Gettysburg, Pa., July 22nd, 1863. In 1860 he held a lieutenant colonel's commission in the Mexican Army, but when the news of the attack on Fort Sumter reached him he at once resigned and offered his services to the Governor of New Hamshire; organized the Fifth New Hampshire Regiment and was commissioned as its colonel; distinguished himself in many important engagements. He was mortally wounded at Gettysburg while leading the First Division of the Second Army Corps." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Colonel E. E. Cross

"Colonel Cross, born in Lancaster, N. H., April 22nd, 1832, died near Gettysburg, Pa., July 22nd, 1863.…

"General George A. Custer, born in New Rumley, Harrison County, Ohio, December 5th, 1839, died in Montana, June 25th, 1876, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in June 1861, and reported for duty at Washington; was assigned to duty as lieutenant in the Fifth Cavalry, and participated, on the day of his arrival at the front, in the first battle of Bull Run. For daring gallantry in a skirmish at Aldie, and in the action at Brandy Station, as well as in the closing operations of the Rappahannock campaign, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers. General custer, with his entire command, was slain by the Sioux indians in the battle of Little Big Horn, in Montana, June 25th, 1876." — Frank Leslie, 1896

George Custer

"General George A. Custer, born in New Rumley, Harrison County, Ohio, December 5th, 1839, died in Montana,…

An illustration of the besieging of a Dacian City.

Siege of a Dacian City

An illustration of the besieging of a Dacian City.

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

Dacian Stronghold

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

"Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, born in Bucks County, Pa., in 1842, died near King and Queen's Courthouse, Va., March 4th 1864. At the beginning of the Civil War he was sent by his father to plan and take charge of a naval battery on Maryland Heights. He then became aid to General Sigel, and served through Fremont's and Pope's campaigns, acting as sigel's chief of artillery at the second battle of Bull Run; served on General Hooker's staff, distinguishing himself at Chancellorsville, and as aid to General Meade at Gettysburg rendering important service. He lost his life in a raid planned by him, in concert with General Kilpatrick, to release the Federal prisoners at Libby Prison and Belle Isle." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Ulric Dahlgren

"Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, born in Bucks County, Pa., in 1842, died near King and Queen's Courthouse,…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

The Death of Poniatowski

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

An admiral of the United States Navy during the Spanish-American War.

Admiral Dewey

An admiral of the United States Navy during the Spanish-American War.

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Beard, repelling the attack of Confederate troops in the vicinity of Doboy River, GA." —Leslie, 1896

Doboy River

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of…

This is a pen drawing by artist R. Spence. It seems to depict men fighting a war.

Pen Drawing

This is a pen drawing by artist R. Spence. It seems to depict men fighting a war.

Famous French general.

Charles Dumouriez

Famous French general.

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's Ferry, on the night of October 23rd, 1861. Of the 1,900 Federals who crossed the river in the morning but a sad remnant reached the island and opposite shore on that awful night. Upward of 500 were taken prisoners; more than 100 were drowned; nearly the same number were killed on the field or shot in the retreat, and upward of 200 were wounded. We shrink from detailing all the incidents of horror which marked this most disastrous action and retreat. It was a fearful blunder from beginning to end. Our illustration represents the successful retreat to the Maryland shore on the night of Wednesday, October 23rd, by moonlight, during a high, cold windstorm." —Leslie, 1896

Edward's ferry

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's…

"View of the Fort Euryalus at Syracuse." — Smith, 1882

Fort Euryalus

"View of the Fort Euryalus at Syracuse." — Smith, 1882

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages from home. It is only those who had relatives in camp that could tell the feverish anxiety of the troops to hear from those they had left at home. We need hardly describe a scene which so thoroughly explains itself. The name of Adams Express was a household one, both to the donor and receiver of good things sent to the absent soldier." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Adams Express

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages…

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random arrow discharged from the rampart fell square in the king's face and destroyed one-half of his sight. When the arrow-head was drawn away, it was found to contain the following label: "Astor to Philip's right eye." It appeared on inquiry that the unerring missile had been discharged by an offended archer who has recently offered his services to the king and been rejected. He hd represented to Philip that his skill with the bow was great that he could kill a small bird on the wing. The king not believing the story had put off the applicant with the remark, "Well, well, I shall make use of thee when I go to war with the starlings." Astor has then joined the Methoneans and now vindicated his skill in a way never to be forgotten."—Ridpath, 1885

Astor to Philip's Right Eye

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random…

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday, July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va." —Leslie, 1896

Review of Federal Army

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday,…

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans, LA., April 19th, 1862. The bombardment of the forts lasted six days, commencing on Friday, April 18th, and practically closing on the 24th, when Flag Officer Farragut passed up with his fleet, Captain Bailey, in the <em>Cayuga</em>, leading. First Division- Captain Bailey commanding: <em>Cayuga, Pensacola, Mississippi, Oneida, Varuna, Katahdin, Kineo, Wissahickon, Portsmouth</em>, towed by <em>J. P. Jackson</em>. Second Division- Flag Officer Farragut commanding: <em>Hartford, Brooklyn, Richmond</em>. Third Division- Captain Bell, commanding: <em>Scioto, Iroquois, Pinola, Itasca, Winona, Kennebec</em>. On Friday, April 25th, at twenty-two minutes past one, this magnificent fleet brought up before the renowned city of New Orleans in battle array. A flag of truce was immediately dispatched by Flag Officer Farragut, demanding an immediate and unconditional surrender." —Leslie, 1896

Federal fleet

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans,…

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal Kitchen

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." — Frank Leslie,…

"General Edward Ferrero was born in Granada, Spain, January 18th, 1831. His parents were Italian, and he was brought to the United States when an infant. At the beginning of the war he was lieutenant colonel of the Eleventh New York Militia Regiment. In 1861 he raised the fifty-first New York Regiment, called the "Shepard Rifles," and led a brigade in Burnside's expedition to Roanoke Island, where his regiment took the first fortified redoubt captured in the war. He was in the battles of South Moutain and Antietam, and for his bravery in the latter engagement was appointed brigadier general, September 19th, 1862. He served with distinction at Fredericksburg, Vicksburg and the siege of Petersburg. He was brevetted a major general, December 2nd, 1864, and mustered out in 1865." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Edward Ferrero

"General Edward Ferrero was born in Granada, Spain, January 18th, 1831. His parents were Italian, and…

(1755-810) Apart of the French military that was an Aid to Rochambeau

Count Fersen

(1755-810) Apart of the French military that was an Aid to Rochambeau

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair Oaks, VA. The peculiarities of the States and nationalities as were represented in the Federal Army developed themselves in a variety of ways. At Fortress Monroe the German regiments erected bowers in which they quaffed their lager and smoked, while their regimental bands played airs which led them back by the ear to Das Vaterland; and the Garibaldi Guard made their tents as much like Swiss cottages as possible. The First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel A. Sully, little dreaming how soon they would have to abandon their handiwork to the enemy, erected a fort around the commodious farm house near Fair Oaks, which, after the battle of Seven Pines, May 31st, 1862, had been given to their captains and lieutenants for their quarters. The appearance was so strange that an officer of General McClellan's staff made a sketch and sent it to us." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First Minnesota Regiment

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair…

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, and the Federal wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>- sinking of the <em>Cumberland</em> by a blow from the <em>Merrimac</em>, March 8th, 1862- sketched by our special artist. About noon on the 8th, a suspicious-looking vessel, looking like a submerged house, with the roof only above water, was discovered, moving down from Norfolk, by the channel in front of Sewall's Point batteries. There was nothing protruding above the water but a flagstaff flying the Confederate flag and a short smokestack. She moved along slowly, and turned into the channel leading to Newport News, and steamed direct for the wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which were lying at the mouth of James River. As soon as she came within range of the <em>Cumberland</em>, the latter opened on her with her heavy guns; but the balls struck and glanced off without effect. In the meantime, as the <em>Merrimac</em> was approaching the two frigates on one side, the Confederate ironclad steamers <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> came down James River, and engaged the frigates on the other side. The batteries at Newport News also opened on the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em>, and did all in their power to assist the <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which, being sailing vessels, were at the mercy of the approaching steamers. The <em>Merrimac</em>, in the meantime, kept steadily on her course, and slowly approached the <em>Cumberland</em>, when she and the <em>Congress</em>, at a distance of one hundred yards, rained full broadsides on the ironclad monters without effect. After receiving the first broadside of the two frigates, she ran on to the <em>Cumberland</em>, striking her about midship, and literally laying open her bow, left her to sink, while she engaged the <em>Congress</em>, which lay about a quarter of a mile distant. The <em>Congress</em>, having no regular crew on board of her, and seeing the hopelessness of resisting the ironclad steamer, at once struck her colors." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First naval battle

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers Merrimac, Yorktown,…

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton Head, S. C., under Colonel Fessenden, U. S. A., June 25th, 1862. Our correspondent at Hilton Head wrote us: "I witnessed the parade entire, as well as the company drills in the manual of arms, etc., afterward, and I must acknowledge my complete surprise at the discipline and even vim evinced by the sable crowd. Dressed in the regulation uniform of the United States Army, tall and strong men generally speaking, they, considering that the regiment had not been fully armed but about ten days, spoke well for officers and men."" &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First Regiment

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton…

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments at Fort Donelson, February 15th, 1862, resulting in the capture of the works on the following morning. The Iowa Second Regiment led the charge, followed by the rest in their order. The sight was sublime. Onward they sped, heedless of the bullets and balls of the enemy above. The hill was so steep, the timber cleared, that the Confederates left a gap in their lines of rifle pits on this crest of hill. Through this gap they were bound to go. Right up they went, climbing upon all fours, their line of dark-blue clothing advancing regularly forward, the white line of smoke from the top of the works opposed by a line of the Federal troops. "They reach the top. Numbers fall. The surprise was breathless. See, they climb over the works- they fall- they are lost! Another group, and still another and another, close up the gap. All is covered in smoke. The lodgment is made; the troops swarm up the hillside, their bright bayonets glittering in the sun. The firing slackens. Close behind the brigade Captain Stone's batery of rifled 10-pounders was tugging up the hill, the horses plunging, the riders whipping. Upward they go, where never vehicle went before- up the precipitous and clogged sides of the hill. No sooner on the crest than the guns were unlimbered, the men at their posts. Percussion shells and canister were shot spitefully from the Parrott guns at the flying enemy. The day was gained, cheers upon cheers rent the air, and in a few minutes all was hushed."" &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Storming of Fort Donelson

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments…

"General view of Forts Hatters and Clark, N. C., captured on the 29th of August, 1861, by the Federal naval and military forces, under command of Commodore Stringham and Major General Butler. Articles of stipulation were signed on the flagship by Commodore Stringham and General Butler on the part of the United States, and by Commodore Barron, Colonel Martin and Major Andrews on the Confederate side, and the swords of the latter delivered up. The two forts remained in possession of the Federal troops, Fort Hatteras under command of Colonel Weber, and Fort Clark under that of Colonel Hawkins. The enemy's loss in killed was 15, and wounded 42; on the Federal side not a single man was either killed or wounded." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hatteras

"General view of Forts Hatters and Clark, N. C., captured on the 29th of August, 1861, by the Federal…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

The attack on Fort Moultrie, South Carolina.

Attack on Fort Moultrie

The attack on Fort Moultrie, South Carolina.

"Old Fort Norfolk, built by the Federal government, but altered and strengthened by the Confederates." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Norfolk

"Old Fort Norfolk, built by the Federal government, but altered and strengthened by the Confederates."…

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, August 1861. For Runyon, named after the commander of the New Jersey Regiments which were formerly stationed there, entirely commanded the road to Alexandria. Our sketch shows the battery erected on this important point. The spot was a most picturesque one, commanding a splendid view all around, the background being the Potomac and Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Fort Runyon

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment,…

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate army- their enthusiastic reception by the inhabitants, September 12th, 1862. Most certainly it was distance that lent enchantment to the view of the eyes of the Marylanders, so far as the Confederate army was concerned, for it appeared that, instead of 50,000 recruits so confidently predicted by Mr. Miles, one of the Confederate Congress of Richmond, they did not actually realize more then 700, and of these nearly 300 refused to carry out their enlistments. All accounts proved that the Confederate army was of the Felstaffian regime, and not at all calculated to make a favorable impression upon the olfactory and pecuniary faculties of the Secessionists of Maryland. When the Confederate generals, with their staffs, entered Frederick City, they were at first welcomed, but when the ragged regiments made their appearance a change came over the spirit of their dream, and the inhabitants woke from their delusion. Our sketch reprsents the rapturous reception given to Gneral McClellan. It was a perfect ovation. Flowers were showered down upon the Federals, while the waving of flags and the cheers of the inhabitants completed the inspiring scene." —Leslie, 1896

Frederick City

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate…