"General Lewis Wallace, born in Brookville, Frankly County, Ind., April 10th, 1827, served in the Mexican War as first lieutenant of Company H, First Indiana Infantry. At the beginning of the Civil War he was appointed adjutant general of Indiana, soon afterward becoming colonel of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers, with which he served in Western Virginia. He became brigadier general of volunteers, September 3rd, 1861; led a division at the capture of Fort Donelson, and displayed such ability that his commission of major general of volunteers followed on March 2nd 1862. In 1863 he prepared the defenses of Cincinnati, and was subsequently assigned to the command of the Eighth Army Corps. With 5,800 men he intercepted the march of General Early, with 28,000 men, on Washington, D. C.; and on July 9th, 1864, he fought the battle of the Monoocacy. General Wallace was mustered out of the volunteer service in 1865." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Lewis Wallace

"General Lewis Wallace, born in Brookville, Frankly County, Ind., April 10th, 1827, served in the Mexican…

A banner showing ancient Greek battles.

War Banner

A banner showing ancient Greek battles.

A war vessel in the dry dock, Mary Island Navy Yard, San Francisco.

War Vessel

A war vessel in the dry dock, Mary Island Navy Yard, San Francisco.

A simulated military operation, carried out to test the validity of a war plan or operational concept: in its simplest form, two opposing teams of officers take part, and when necessary, military units of the required strength are employed.

Naval Wargame

A simulated military operation, carried out to test the validity of a war plan or operational concept:…

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." — Smith, 1882

Greek warriot

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." — Smith, 1882

"Reconnoissance of Warsaw Sound, December 5th, 1861, by a detachment of gunboats under Captain Rodgers, Savannah in the distance." —Leslie, 1896

Warsow Sound

"Reconnoissance of Warsaw Sound, December 5th, 1861, by a detachment of gunboats under Captain Rodgers,…

George Washington warning General Braddock in his tent.

Washington and Braddock

George Washington warning General Braddock in his tent.

An illustration of George Washington directing the artillery at the Battle of Trenton in New Jersey. This battle took place on December 26, 1776 during the American Revolutionary War.

George Washington in Trenton

An illustration of George Washington directing the artillery at the Battle of Trenton in New Jersey.…

An illustration of George Washington and his army marching to Trenton, New Jersey, where the Battle of Trenton took place.

George Washington Marching to Trenton

An illustration of George Washington and his army marching to Trenton, New Jersey, where the Battle…

"General Webb, born in New York city, February 15th, 1835, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1855, and assigned to the artillery. He served in Florida, Minnesota, and for three years as assistant professor at West Point. He was present at Bull Run and in defenses of Washington until 1862, when he participated in the battles of the Peninsula campaign of the Army of the Potomac, and as chief of staff of the Fifth Corps during the Maryland and Rappahannock campaigns till June 23rd, 1863. He was then commissioned brigadier general of volunteers, and placed in command of a brigade of the Second Corps, serving with great credit at the battle of Gettysburg. He was made major general, United States Army, for gallant and meritorious services in the campaign terminating with the surrender of the insurgent army under General Lee." —Leslie, 1896

General Alexander S. Webb

"General Webb, born in New York city, February 15th, 1835, was graduated from the United States Military…

"Fire raft sent down from Fort Jackson to destroy the Federal fleet below the fort- the boats of the squadron, with grapnels, buckets, etc. and the ferryboat "Westfield," towing it away from the Federal vessels. On April 17th, 1862, as the fire raft came on, the ferryboat "Westfield" ran into it, and then rapidly backing, poured a tremendous stream of water from a hose at the burning mass as it slowly floated down the river. The "Westfield" was assisted by numerous boats from the fleet, who used their buckets and boathoks to guide it safely away from the vessels at anchor. After a long and desperate conflict with the floating and fiery mass the brave Federal tars triumphed, the fire was extinguished, and only a mass of blackened and half-burned timber remained." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Westfield

"Fire raft sent down from Fort Jackson to destroy the Federal fleet below the fort- the boats of the…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

General Sherman's march to the sea in the Civil War.

William Sherman

General Sherman's march to the sea in the Civil War.

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged with the enemy. This desperate battle between the Confederates on one hand and the divisions of General Heintzelman and Franklin on the other was fought on the morning of Monday, June 30th, 1862, at Willis Church, a place midway between the White Oak Swamp Bridge and Turkey Bend, where, later in the day, another fierce fight raged, the week of combat being closed next day by the deadly but drawn battle of Malvern Hill. Our sketch represents the position of part of the Federal army at ten o'clock in the morning, just as the battle was commencing. The baggage train is in the foreground, and the enemy is advancing upon the Federal lines, and covering the advance with a heavy shower of shells. Willis Church is on the left of the illustration, being what most of the Southern places of worship were, mere wooden barns." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Willis Church

"Battle at Willis Church, Monday, June 30th, 1862- the Federal forces, under General Heintzelman, engaged…

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by General Tyler. The contest raged furiously till three o'clock in the afternoon, the fighting being done chiefly by the artillery and the musketry, at a range of not more than three or four hundred yards, and often much less. The Confederate infantry opposite the right now debouched from the woods, and attempted to capture Doan's battery by a charge. The first effort was nearly successful, but the heavy discharge of grape compelled them to retire in confusion. A second and weaker attempt likewise failed, and the enemy fell back, with heavy loss, behind the stone parapet. General Tyler then ordered his brigade to charge the enemy's batteries on the left, and a most deadly encounter followed. Twice the Federals reeled under storm; but in the third effort they routed the Confederates with tremendous slaughter, amid loud cheering, capturing two of their guns and four caissons." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Winchester

"Battle of Winchester, VA., March 23rd, 1862- decisive bayonet charge of the Federal troops, led by…

"Camp Wool, two miles from Fort Clark, Hatteras Island, occupied by Hawkins's Zouaves, Ninth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in October, 1861. Camp Wool, which was occupied by the New York Ninth Regiment of Volunteers, was about two miles from Fort Hatteras, and situated on the Pamlico side of the island, in order to be partially sheltered from the Atlantic gales. Besides, as any sudden attack must come from the sound, it put the troops in a better spot to keep a bright look out. The Ninth Zouaves were in an excellent state of discipline, and reflected great credit upon their colonel, Rush Hawkins, who fought his way bravely through the Mexican war. It numbered one thousand and forty-six men. Until the unfortunate capture of the <em>Fanny</em>, it had not lost a single man, although it had been engaged in numerous skirmishes with the Confederates at Newport News." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Camp Wool

"Camp Wool, two miles from Fort Clark, Hatteras Island, occupied by Hawkins's Zouaves, Ninth Regiment,…

"About the year 480 B.C., Xerxes, an Asiatic king, assailed the country with an army of several millions. He was met by the fearless Greeks with indomitable valor; his squadrons were cut to pieces, and the baffled monarch was driven back in disgrace to his own dominions." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Xerxes surveying his army

"About the year 480 B.C., Xerxes, an Asiatic king, assailed the country with an army of several millions.…

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em> and the Federal gunboat <em>Carondelet</em>, at the mouth of the Yazoo River, Tuesday, July 15th, 1862. Next to the ever-memorable combat between the <em>Merrimac</em> and the <em>Monitor</em>, that of the <em>Carondelet</em> and the <em>Arkansas</em> was the most exciting. Like the former engagement, it ended in a drawn battle. On July 14th, 1862, the gunboats <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Tyler</em> were sent by Commodore Farragut to survey the Yazoo River and ascertain the exact condition of the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em>, about which there were various reports. They arrived at the mouth of the Yazoo, fifteen miles above Vicksburg, at seven o'clock in the evening, and anchored for the night. Next morning at daylight they tipped anchor and slowly steamed up the Yazoo, the <em>Tyler</em> considerably in advance. About two miles up the river smoke was seen across a little point of land, which, as Captain Gwin of the <em>Tyler</em> surmised, proceeded from the Confederate ram, now rapidly steaming toward the <em>Tyler</em>. In another moment a heavy report was heard from the enigmatical gunboat, and a huge round shot went howling over the deck of the <em>Tyler</em>. Captain Walke of the <em>Carondelet</em> ordered the <em>Tyler</em> to proceed with all speed to alarm the fleet and advise it to prepare for her approach while he engaged the Confederate monster. In ten minutes afterward the <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Arkansas</em> were alongside each other, and the conflict commenced in earnest. The <em>Carondelet</em> commenced with her bow guns, striking her opponent with a rapidity and precision which the enormous strength of the iron plating alone prevented taking immediate effect. The <em>Arkansas</em> used in return her rifled and guns with terrible effect, some of the shots going right through the <em>Carondelet</em>. Seeing her inability to cope with her antagonist, Captain Walke ran the <em>Carondelet</em> alongside the <em>Arkansas</em> and grappled her. The order "Boarders away!" was instantly passed, and the crew of the Federal gunboat speedily mounted the deck of its adversary. When there they found no foe to engage. The crew of the Arkansas had retired below, and the iron hatches were closed, so that it was uttlerly impossible to go down and continue the action." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Combat at Yazoo River

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram Arkansas and the Federal gunboat…

"A detachment of United States sailors from the gunboats <em>Albatross</em> and <em>Gemsbok</em> burning the contraband vessel <em>York</em>. Mouth of Rogue's inlet, near Beaufort, N. C., January 23rd, 1862." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Burning of York

"A detachment of United States sailors from the gunboats Albatross and Gemsbok burning…

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. This famous body of fiery and active soldiers at length got free from the trammels and confinement of their city quarters, a change which was both pleasant and beneficial to them. They were encamped on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and, as our sketch will show, were most comfortably situated. Colonel Ellsworth was indefatigable in drilling his regiment, and his men most willingly seconded his efforts by close attention to duty and alacrity in the performance of all the details of camp life. The Zuoaves proved to be one of the most effective regiments in the field; they rendered efficent service in building breastworks on the outskirts of Alexandria, thereby preyenting the possibility of a surprise from the enemy, and distinguished themselves at the Battle of Bull Run in their successful assault on a confederate battery at the point of the bayonet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Zouaves

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington,…

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment and escort passing the corner of Broadway and Canal Street, April 29th, 1861. The Fire Zouaves, under command of Colonel Ellsworth, mustering over eleven hundred strong, embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, on Monday, April 29th, 1861, amid a most enthusiastic ovation. Chosen from so popular a corps as the firemen of New York, they could not fail to arouse public sympathy to a large extent. As it was generally known that three separate stands of colors would be presented to them- one at their barracks, another by Mrs. Astor, and the third at the Astor House by Mr. Stetson- an immense crowd attended every movement of this gallant regiment. The first flag was presented by Mr. Wickham, on behalf of the Fire Department and Common Council. The Hon. J. A. Dix then, in behalf of Mrs. Augusta Astor, presented them with another stand of colors, with a very handsome letter from the fair donor. The regiment then marched through Bond Street, the Bowery and Chatham Street to the Astor House, where Mr. Stetson presented them with a third flag in the name of the ladies of the house. After a short soldierly response from the colonel, the regiment with their noble escort, marched to the foot of Canal Street, where they embarked on board the <em>Baltic</em>, which steamed down the river on her way to Annapolis." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Ellsworth's Zouaves

"The departure of Colonel Ellsworth's Zouaves from New york, escorted by the fire department- the regiment…