225 illustrations of trees including: quaking aspen, queensland nut, quince, red birch, red maple, red oak, rock elm, rocky mountain juniper, royal palm, rubber tree, sabal, sago, salix, sand pine, sandalwood, sandbox tree, sapodilla, sapote, sassafras, scarlet oak, scotch pine, screw pine, sequoia, shagbark hickory, silver fir, silver bell, snowdrop, spruce, stone pine, sugar maple, sumac, sweet birch, and sycamore

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets eleven to thirty-one); alternate; edge of leaflets evenly and sharply toothed. Outline - of leaflet, narrow egg-shape. Apex - long, taper-pointed. Base, rounded or slightly heart-shaped. Leaflet/Stem - lacking. Leaf/Stem - densely velvety-hairy. Leaflet - usually two to four inches long and about one fourth as wide; the under surface whitish and more or less downy. Leaf - one or two feet or more in length. Branchlets - and stalks, especially towards their ends, covered with a very dense velvet-like down, often crimson-tinged. The just is milky and acid. Flowers - greenish-yellow, in upright, pyramid-shaped bunches at the ends of the branches. June. Berries - rounded, somewhat flattened, bright crimson velvety, crowded. Stone - smooth. Juice, acid. September, October. Found - from New Brunswick and the valley of the St. Lawrence through the Northern States, and southward along the Alleghany Mountains to Central Alabama. General Information - A small tree, ten to thirty feet high (or often a shrub), with straggling and evenly spreading branches that are leaved mostly toward their ends, giving an umbrella-like look to the tree. The wood is very soft and brittle; yellow within; the sap-wood white. The young shoots with the pith removed, are used in the spring as "sap quills" in drawing the sap from the sugar maples. The downy and irregular branchlets are suggestive of the horns of a stag, whence the name. An infusion of the berries is sometimes used as a gargle for sore-throat. This species is not poisonous. A variety with deeply gashed leaves (var. laciniata) is reported from Hanover, N. H.

Genus Rhus, L. (Sumach)

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets eleven to thirty-one); alternate; edge of leaflets evenly…

Evergreen belonging to the cypress family.

Thuja Standishii

Evergreen belonging to the cypress family.

Illustrated in a stem of young pine attacked by peridermium pini. Peridermium pini is a fungus that almost always grows on trees young twenty years old. The fungus ultimately kills the branches.

Stem of Young Pine Attached by Peridermium Pini

Illustrated in a stem of young pine attacked by peridermium pini. Peridermium pini is a fungus that…

"Stemless Palm. b, spadix, with spathe forming a hood over fruit; c, fruit, about one-fifth natural size." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Stemless Palm

"Stemless Palm. b, spadix, with spathe forming a hood over fruit; c, fruit, about one-fifth natural…

A stick.

Stick

A stick.

Also known as Torreya taxifolia. A plant found in the Southeastern United States.

Branch of Stinking Cedar

Also known as Torreya taxifolia. A plant found in the Southeastern United States.

Stone pine and parasol pine are the common names of pinus pinea. The tree grows between fifty and sixty feet tall. This tree is native to the Mediterranean region.

Stone Pine

Stone pine and parasol pine are the common names of pinus pinea. The tree grows between fifty and sixty…

"Strawberry-Tree (Arbutus Unedo)."-Whitney, 1902

Strawberry Tree

"Strawberry-Tree (Arbutus Unedo)."-Whitney, 1902

The seeds of the Striped Maple, Acer pennsylvanicum, (Keeler, 1915).

Striped Maple seed

The seeds of the Striped Maple, Acer pennsylvanicum, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple, opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes very finely sharply toothed. Outline - rounded in the lower half, three-lobed above with the hollows between the lobes sharp. Apex - of the lobes, slim and pointed. Base - more or less heart-shape. Bark - smooth, green, and peculiarly marked lengthwise with dark stripes. Flowers - large, yellowish-green. May, June. Fruit - with spreading pale-green wings, in long clusters. Found - in Canada, through the Northern Atlantic States, westward to Northeastern Minnesota, and along the Alleghany Mountains to Georgia. General Information - A small and slender tree or shrub, usually ten to twenty-five feet high. Acer, from a Latin word meaning sharp, because of the ancient use of the wood for spearheads and other weapons.

Genus Acer, L. (Maple)

Leaves - simple, opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes very finely sharply toothed. Outline - rounded…

"Styrax suberifolium. 1. a flower; 2. corolla and stamens; 3. pistil." -Lindley, 1853

Styrax

"Styrax suberifolium. 1. a flower; 2. corolla and stamens; 3. pistil." -Lindley, 1853

"Styrax leiophylla. 1. a flower natural size; 2. ditto cut open; 3. stamen seen in front; 4. ovary, with half the calyx removed; 5. longitudinal section of ovary; 6. transverse ditto; 7. ripe fruit; 8. longitudinal section of seed." -Lindley, 1853

Styrax

"Styrax leiophylla. 1. a flower natural size; 2. ditto cut open; 3. stamen seen in front; 4. ovary,…

Pair of samaras of Sugar Maple.

Sugar Maple

Pair of samaras of Sugar Maple.

Embryo of Sugar Maple,(Gray, 1858).

Sugar Maple Embryo

Embryo of Sugar Maple,(Gray, 1858).

Whole embryo of Sugar Maple just beginning to grow.

Sugar Maple Embryo

Whole embryo of Sugar Maple just beginning to grow.

The seeds of the Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum, (Keeler, 1915).

Sugar Maple seed

The seeds of the Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes very sparingly and coarsely sharp-toothed or the lower pair entire. Outline - rounded, with three to five lobes, usually five, with the hollows between the lobes and between the coarse teeth rounded. Apex - of the lobes, pointed. Base - heart-shaped or nearly squared. Leaf - dark green above; slightly lighter beneath; smooth or somewhat downy on the ribs; closely resembling that of the introduced "Norway Maple" by lacking the latter's milky-juiced leaf-stem. Bark - light gray, usually smoothish when young, becoming rough and scaly. Flowers - yellow-green and very abundant. April, May.  Fruit - greenish-yellow, smooth, drooping, on thread-like and hairy stems one to two inches long, with wings about one inch long, broad and slightly spreading. September. Found - from Southern Canada through the Northern States, southward along the Alleghany Mountains, and westward to Minnesota, Eastern Nebraska, and Eastern Texas. Its finest development is in the region of the Great Lakes. It grows in rich woods; often it forms "groves," sometimes extensive forests.

Genus Acer, L. (Maple)

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes very sparingly and coarsely sharp-toothed or the…

Also known as Pinus lamertiana. The pine cone of a sugar pine tree.

Pine Cone of Sugar Pine

Also known as Pinus lamertiana. The pine cone of a sugar pine tree.

Sumac is any one of approximately 250 species of flowering plants in the genus Rhus and related genera, in the family Anacardiaceae. The dried berries of some species are ground to produce a tangy purple spice often used in juice. Sumacs grow in subtropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world, especially in North America. Sumacs are shrubs and small trees that can reach a height of 1-10 meters. The leaves are spirally arranged; they are usually pinnately compound, though some species have trifoliate or simple leaves.

Tanner's Sumac Branch

Sumac is any one of approximately 250 species of flowering plants in the genus Rhus and related genera,…

Also known as Quercus michauxii. The branch of a Swamp Chestnut Oak tree, native to the wetlands of the southern and central United States

Branch of Swamp Chestnut Oak

Also known as Quercus michauxii. The branch of a Swamp Chestnut Oak tree, native to the wetlands of…

This shows part of the fruiting ament of the Swamp Cottonwood, Populus heterophylla, (Keeler, 1915).

Swamp Cottonwood Fruit

This shows part of the fruiting ament of the Swamp Cottonwood, Populus heterophylla, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the leaf of the Swamp Cottonwood, Populus heterophylla, (Keeler, 1915).

Swamp Cottonwood Leaf

This shows the leaf of the Swamp Cottonwood, Populus heterophylla, (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Populus heterophylla. The branch from a Swamp Cottonwood tree, native to warm regions of North America.

Branch of Swamp Cottonwood

Also known as Populus heterophylla. The branch from a Swamp Cottonwood tree, native to warm regions…

Also known as Hicoria minima. The branch of a Swamp Hickory tree, which produces pear-shaped nuts.

Branch of Swamp Hickory

Also known as Hicoria minima. The branch of a Swamp Hickory tree, which produces pear-shaped nuts.

Also known as Quercus laurifolia. The branch of a Swamp Laurel Oak, native to the southeast United States.

Branch of Swamp Laurel Oak

Also known as Quercus laurifolia. The branch of a Swamp Laurel Oak, native to the southeast United States.

Also known as Quercus palustris. A species of red oak tree native to eastern United States.

Branch of Swamp Spanish Oak

Also known as Quercus palustris. A species of red oak tree native to eastern United States.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge quite deeply wavy-toothed. Outline - reverse egg-shape or oval. Apex - blunt-pointed. Base - pointed. Leaf - five to eight inches long; smooth, and rather bright green above; whitish-downy beneath, becoming almost silvery-white; often with a rather deep hollow just below the middle, and usually abruptly spreading above; the teeth unequal, longest toward the middle of the leaf, sometimes almost long enough to be called lobes; mostly rounded at the apex, but sometimes ending in a hard point; the main ribs prominent and rust-colored. Bark - of trunk, grayish-white, dividing into large, flat scales. Acorns - usually in pairs on a stem one and a quarter to three inches long. Cup - rounded, rather thin, rough, with sharp scales; the upper scales bristle-tipped, forming a border, or sometimes a fringe, along the edge; slightly downy within. Nut - one inch or less in length, egg-shape; sweet. October. Found - from Southern Maine and the Upper St. Lawrence to Southeastern Iowa and Western Missouri, south to Delaware and along the Alleghany Mountains to Northern Georgia; along borders of streams and in swamps, in deep, rich soil. Its finest growth is in the region of the Great Lakes. General Information - A tree thirty to sixty feet high or more, with wood similar in value to that of the White Oak. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge quite deeply wavy-toothed. Outline - reverse egg-shape or oval. Apex…

Sweet bay is the common name of laurus nobilis. The leaves are stiff, dull green, and alternate. The tree sometimes obtains a height of forty to sixty feet. Pictured are trees in tubs.

Sweet Bay

Sweet bay is the common name of laurus nobilis. The leaves are stiff, dull green, and alternate. The…

Leaves - Simple, alternate, edge entire. Outline - long oval or slightly reverse egg-shape. Apex, slightly blunt-pointed. Base, pointed. Leaf -about three to six inches long, thick and smooth; dark green and polished above; white below; the middle rib green and distinct; the side ribs slight and indistinct. Bark - of trunk, smoothish, light gray, aromatic and bitter. Flowers - large (two to three inches wide), white, at the ends of the branches, very fragrant. June, July. Fruit - bright red berries, at first in small cone-like clusters, then hanging by slender threads. September.  Found - in swampy ground, from Massachusetts southward, usually near the coast. <p>General Information - A small tree (often a bush) four to twenty-five feet high, or higher southward, where its leaves are evergreen. All parts of the tree (and it is the same with the other magnolias) have an intensely bitter, aromatic juice, which is stimulating and tonic. From "magnol," the name of a botanist of the seventeenth century.

Genus Magnolia, L. (Magnolia)

Leaves - Simple, alternate, edge entire. Outline - long oval or slightly reverse egg-shape. Apex, slightly…

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Sweet Birch, Betula lenta (Keeler, 1915).

Sweet Birch Fruit

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Sweet Birch, Betula lenta (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Betula lenta. A species of birch native to eastern North America.

Branch of Sweet Birch

Also known as Betula lenta. A species of birch native to eastern North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge finely and sharply double-toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - pointed. Base - heart-shaped. Leaf/Stem - short and downy. Leaf - two to four inches long; about one half as wide; silky-hairy when young, but becoming smooth, except on the ribs beneath. Bark - of trunk, a dark chestnut-brown; smoothish when young, but becoming rough in old trees. The smaller branches are smooth and dotted with white spots. In its leaves and the color of the twigs it somewhat resembles the garden cherry. The foliage and bark are very aromatic and sweet-tasting.Found - from Newfoundland to Northern Delaware, westward, and southward along the mountains. It is very common in the northern forest. General Information - A tree thirty to sixty feet high, with many slender branches. The wood is hard, fine-grained, and of a reddish tint. It is largely used for cabinet-work (sometimes in place of a more valuable Black Cherry) and for fuel.

Genus Betula, L. (Birch)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge finely and sharply double-toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - pointed.…

Leaves - compound (hand-shaped; leaflets, usually five, sometimes seven); opposite; edge toothed. Outline - of leaflet, long oval, long egg-shape, or long reverse egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - pointed. Leaflet - four to nine inches long, one to three inches wide, usually minutely downy beneath. Flowers, pale yellow. April, May. Fruit - two to two and one half inches in diameter, rounded. Husk - not prickly, but uneven. Nut - one or two in a husk, large and brown. Found - from Alleghany County, Pennsylvania, southward along the Alleghany Mountains to Northern Georgia and Alabama, and westward. General Information - A tree thirty to seventy feet high. Its wood is light and hard to split. With the other species of the same genus it is preferred, above any other American wood, for the making of artificial limbs.

Genus Aesculus, L. (Buckeye, Horse Chestnut)

Leaves - compound (hand-shaped; leaflets, usually five, sometimes seven); opposite; edge toothed. Outline…

Also known as Malus coronaria. The branch of a Sweet Crabapple tree, native to the southern United States.

Branch of Sweet Crabapple

Also known as Malus coronaria. The branch of a Sweet Crabapple tree, native to the southern United States.

Sweet gum and bilsted alligator tree are the common names of liquidambar styraciflua. The leaves are five to seven lobed. The tree blooms March to May.

Sweet Gum

Sweet gum and bilsted alligator tree are the common names of liquidambar styraciflua. The leaves are…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge deeply lobed (lobes finely and sharply toothed throughout). Outline - rounded. The lobes are five to seven, radiating from the base. Apex - of the lobes, pointed. Base - of the leaf heart-shape. Leaf - three to seven inches in diameter, smooth and shining with a pleasant odor when bruised. Ribs tufted at their angles. Bark - gray; usually strongly winged with corky ridges along the branchlets. In the South, a spicy gum, from which the tree takes its name, oozes from the bark. Fruit - small woody pods are collected into a round ball. These usually contain a few good seeds and a large number of others that resemble saw-dust. September. Found - from Connecticut to Illinois, and southward. It reaches its finest growth and is very common in the bottom lands of the Mississippi basin. General Information - A fine tree sixty to seventy feel high, or southward one hundred feet and more. The wood is valuable, and would be better appreciated except for the difficulty of seasoning it. It is sometimes used as a substitute for Black Walnut, Its gum is used medicinally.

Genus Liquidamber, L. (Sweet Bum)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge deeply lobed (lobes finely and sharply toothed throughout). Outline…

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge closely and sharply toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - pointed. Base - round. Quite variable. Leaf/Stem - winged on both sides with a wavy border; when young, sprinkled with brownish glands. Leaf - about three to four inches long, and half as wide or more; smooth. Flowers - white, in flat, stemless clusters. May, June. Fruit - one half inch long; oval; sweetish; red, becoming almost black when ripe; edible. Found - from Hudson's Bay through the Northern States, southward to Georgia. Common in swamps and rich, moist soil. General Information - A tree fifteen to twenty feet high, with hard, ill-smelling wood.

Genus Viburnum, L. (Haw and Viburnum)

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge closely and sharply toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - pointed. Base…

Swiss stone pine is the common name of pinus cembra. The leaves are marked with silver lines and are slender and flexible. The tree grows between fifty and one hundred fifty feet tall.

Swiss Stone Pine

Swiss stone pine is the common name of pinus cembra. The leaves are marked with silver lines and are…

The name applied to a species of maple trees. It occurs in abundance in the western states, and is frequently called plane or buttonwood.

Sycamore

The name applied to a species of maple trees. It occurs in abundance in the western states, and is frequently…

These are the fruit of Sycamore, Platanus occidentalis, (Keeler, 1915).

Sycamore Fruit

These are the fruit of Sycamore, Platanus occidentalis, (Keeler, 1915).

A leaf from a sycamore tree.

Sycamore Leaf

A leaf from a sycamore tree.

Sycamore three years after very close pruning.

Sycamore three years after very close pruning.

Sycamore three years after very close pruning.

A common beech, this large European beech features toothed leaves.

Fagus Sylvatica

A common beech, this large European beech features toothed leaves.

Deciduous tree of the Fagaceae family, commonly planted as an ornament.

Fagus Sylvatica

Deciduous tree of the Fagaceae family, commonly planted as an ornament.

"Symplocos laxiflora. 1. expanded flower; 2. corolla cut open; 3. a stamen; 4. longitudinal section of ovary; 5. transverse ditto; 6. ripe fruit; 7. longitudinal section of ditto." -Lindley, 1853

Symplocos

"Symplocos laxiflora. 1. expanded flower; 2. corolla cut open; 3. a stamen; 4. longitudinal section…