This ClipArt gallery offers 244 illustrations of ancient Roman architecture. Roman architecture adopted many styles from the Greek, and is most noted for their expert implementation and frequent use of the arch and dome.

"A small temple, supposed to have been build by Numa, and dedicated to Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, situated on the Esquiline. It was a small and humble structure suited to the simplicity of the age in which it was erected, and was not termed Capitolium until after the foundation of the one mentioned below, from which it was then distinguished as the capitolium vetus." — Smith, 1873;

Capitolium

"A small temple, supposed to have been build by Numa, and dedicated to Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, situated…

Tepidarium at the Baths of Caracalla.

Baths of Caracalla

Tepidarium at the Baths of Caracalla.

The ground plan of the baths of Caracalla. The Baths of Caracalla were Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the Emperor Caracalla.

Baths of Caracalla

The ground plan of the baths of Caracalla. The Baths of Caracalla were Roman public baths, or thermae,…

"Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Caracalla was eldest son of the Emperor Severus, born in Lyons, A.D. 188. On the death of his father he succeeded to the throne with his brother, Antoninus Geta, whom he speedily murdered. Among the buildings of Caracalla in Rome, the baths-Thermæ Caracallæ- near Porta Capena, were most celebrated, and their ruins are still magnificent."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Hall in Baths of Caracalla

"Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Caracalla was eldest son of the Emperor Severus, born in Lyons, A.D. 188.…

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the emperor Caracalla. At the time the baths included marble seats for bathers, a public library, gymnasiums and restaurants.

Ruins of the Baths of Caracalla

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and…

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the emperor Caracalla. At the time the baths included marble seats for bathers, a public library, gymnasiums and restaurants.

Ruins of the Baths of Caracalla

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and…

A hinge or pivot. The first figure, in the annexed woodcut, is designed to show the general form of a door, as we find it with a pivot at the top and bottom in ancient remains of stone, marble, wood, and bronze. The second figure represents a bronze hinge in the Egyptian collection of the British Museum: its pivot is exactly cylindrical. Under these is drawn the threshhold of a temple, or other large edifice, with the plan of the folding-doors. The pivots move in holes fitted to receive them, each of which is in an angle behind the antepagmentum. The Greeks and Romans also used hinges exactly like those now in common use. Four Roman hinges of bronze, preserved in the British Museum, are shown in the following woodcut.

Cardo

A hinge or pivot. The first figure, in the annexed woodcut, is designed to show the general form of…

A roman moulding, called a <em>Cavetto.</em>  It consists of a quarter circle with a sunk fillet below. By referring to the figure it will be seen that it is exactly the reverse of the ovolo. The center for describing the quarter circle is without instead of within the moulding. Itis also called a <em>Concave Moulding</em>.

Cavetto

A roman moulding, called a Cavetto. It consists of a quarter circle with a sunk fillet below.…

Typical Roman ceiling panel.

Ceiling Panel

Typical Roman ceiling panel.

A coffer in architecture, is a sunken panel in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault. A series of these sunken panels were used as decoration for a ceiling or a vault. The stone coffers of the ancient Greeks and Romans are the earliest surviving examples.A, from Palmyra; B, Basilica of Constantine.

Roman Ceiling Panels

A coffer in architecture, is a sunken panel in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling,…

"Ground Plan of the Circus."

Circus

"Ground Plan of the Circus."

"Spina of the Circus, from an ancient bas relief." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Circus

"Spina of the Circus, from an ancient bas relief." — Smith, 1873

"Chariot-racing was a favorite amusement, and the great circuses were arranged especially for such contests. The space was broad enough to accommodate three of four chariots side by side, each with four horses abreast."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Circus Maximus

"Chariot-racing was a favorite amusement, and the great circuses were arranged especially for such contests.…

"A sewer, a drain. Rome was intersected by numerous sewers, some of which were of an immense size: the most celebrated of them was the cloaca maxima, the construction of which is ascribed to Tarquinius Priscus. It was formed by three tiers of arces, one within the other, the innermost of which is a semicircular vault of 14 feet in diameter. The manner of its construction is shown in the annexed cut. Under the republic, the administration of the sewers was entrusted to the censors; but under the empire, particular officers were appointed for that purpose, called cloacarum curatores, who employed condemned criminals in cleansing and repairing them." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Cloaca

"A sewer, a drain. Rome was intersected by numerous sewers, some of which were of an immense size: the…

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra and other gates at Perugia; so also in the Cloac&aelig; at Rome, of which the Cloaca Maxima is 20 feet broad. These are sewers which were intended to render the marshy district between the hills of Rome inhabitable. They were constructed in the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, at the beginning of the sixth century B.C.

The Cloaca Maxima at Rome

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra…

The details of the reconstructed facade of the Coliseum at Rome.

Coliseum Facade

The details of the reconstructed facade of the Coliseum at Rome.

The Colosseum is an immense amphitheater built at Rome by Flavius Vespasian, AD 72.

Colosseum

The Colosseum is an immense amphitheater built at Rome by Flavius Vespasian, AD 72.

"The vast Flavian amphitheater at Rome now called the Colosseum." -Breasted, 1914

Colosseum

"The vast Flavian amphitheater at Rome now called the Colosseum." -Breasted, 1914

An illustration of the Roman Colosseum.

Colosseum

An illustration of the Roman Colosseum.

The Colosseum in Rome.

Colosseum

The Colosseum in Rome.

The Colosseum at Rome was the greatest of Roman ampitheatres.

Colosseum at Rome

The Colosseum at Rome was the greatest of Roman ampitheatres.

The construction of arches and vaults did not remain confined to the interior of buildings, but imparted its own expression to the architecture of the exterior also; for the shape of openings became circular instead of square, although they were surrounded by half-columns gave a rectilinear finish to the whole.

Architecture of the Colosseum

The construction of arches and vaults did not remain confined to the interior of buildings, but imparted…

"Elevation and Section of the Tiers of Seats and Substructure of the same from the Colosseum at Rome. The whole mass of the rows of seats was supported by a solid substructure of piers and arches, which formed passages of three stories one above the other, retaining the circular form of the building; whilst externally they formed arcades, which were surrounded with half-columns or piers with entablatures over them. The exterior of the straight portion of the building, which contained the stage and some chambers connected with it, was generally surrounded by a portico. The theaters were either open, or were protected against the sun and rain by an awning stretched over them."

Elevation and Section of the Colosseum

"Elevation and Section of the Tiers of Seats and Substructure of the same from the Colosseum at Rome.…

"Ground Plan of the Colosseum at Rome, with representation of the Tiers of Seats, and of the Substructure. The shape of the amphitheatre was borrowed from that of the theatre. Since no stage was necessary, and with a view to securing as many rows of seats as possible, the semicircular form of the theatre was done away with, and the whole became a circle, or rather an ellipse, which was afterwards the recognized shape for all buildings of this nature, whether at Rome or in the provinces."

Ground Plan of the Colosseum

"Ground Plan of the Colosseum at Rome, with representation of the Tiers of Seats, and of the Substructure.…

The Colosseum or Roman Coliseum, originally the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium, Italian Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo), is an elliptical amphitheatre in the center of the city of Rome, Italy, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

Colosseum, Half Plan

The Colosseum or Roman Coliseum, originally the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium,…

This Roman Colosseum is located in Rome, Italy. It is the largest elliptical amphitheater that was built during the Roman Empire. Its construction was completed in 80 A.D. during the rule of Emperor Titus. The Colosseum was used for Gladiator contests and public spectacles.

Roman Colosseum

This Roman Colosseum is located in Rome, Italy. It is the largest elliptical amphitheater that was built…

The Trajan's column is a monument in honor of Emperor Trajan located in Rome, Italy. The column is a continuous bas-relief design (raised art) that winds up around the capital from the base to the top of the capital. The relief designs depict Emperor Trajan's two victorious wars against the Dacian's.

Trajan's Column

The Trajan's column is a monument in honor of Emperor Trajan located in Rome, Italy. The column is a…

"The columns of <em>cipollino</em>, which belonged to the Palace of Domitian." &mdash; Young, 1901

Columns of Domitian

"The columns of cipollino, which belonged to the Palace of Domitian." — Young, 1901

"Columns of Temple of Castor, Temple of Augustus, and Palatine Hill." &mdash; Young, 1901

Columns of Temple of Castor

"Columns of Temple of Castor, Temple of Augustus, and Palatine Hill." — Young, 1901

"Semi-columns (Roman). Engaged columns of the Maison Carr&eacute;e, N&icirc;mes, France." -Whitney, 1911

Semi-Columns

"Semi-columns (Roman). Engaged columns of the Maison Carrée, Nîmes, France." -Whitney,…

Arch of Titus.

Composite Order

Arch of Titus.

"This arch is the most modern and the best preseved of all the buildings which remain of the Imperial period. Probably it owes its preservation to the Christianity of its hero." &mdash; Young, 1901

Arch of Constantine

"This arch is the most modern and the best preseved of all the buildings which remain of the Imperial…

"The vast Arch of Constantine owes much of its interest to its sculptures having been borrowed from a Trajan monument of earlier date." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Arch of Constantine

"The vast Arch of Constantine owes much of its interest to its sculptures having been borrowed from…

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge. It is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of…

Monuments in Constantinople by Greeks, Romans, and Turks.

Constantinople

Monuments in Constantinople by Greeks, Romans, and Turks.

Enriched Corinthian base from the Temple of Concord.

Corinthian Base

Enriched Corinthian base from the Temple of Concord.

Enriched Corinthian base in the Baptistery of Constantine.

Corinthian Base

Enriched Corinthian base in the Baptistery of Constantine.

Corinthian capital from the Temple of Mars, Ultor.

Corinthian Capital

Corinthian capital from the Temple of Mars, Ultor.

A Roman Corinthian Column.

Corinthian Column

A Roman Corinthian Column.

A Roman Corinthian Column.

Corinthian Column

A Roman Corinthian Column.

The frame-work of Corinthian style of the Temple of Jupiter at Rome.

Corinthian Frame

The frame-work of Corinthian style of the Temple of Jupiter at Rome.

Corinthian Order, common amonth the Romans.

Corinthian Order

Corinthian Order, common amonth the Romans.

Temple of Castor and Pollux.

Corinthian Order

Temple of Castor and Pollux.

Greco-Roman Corinthian order of Temple of Vesta.

Corinthian Order

Greco-Roman Corinthian order of Temple of Vesta.

"Ornamented Cornice with Pearl Beading. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman architecture, and consequently became more massive and more copious itself."

Roman Cornice

"Ornamented Cornice with Pearl Beading. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character…

"Richly Ornamented Roman Ovolo. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman architecture, and consequently became more massive and more copious itself."

Roman Cornice

"Richly Ornamented Roman Ovolo. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman…

The courtyard of an antique structure.

Courtyard of a House

The courtyard of an antique structure.

A roman moulding, called a <em>Cyma Recta.</em> It is a moulding of double curvature and two fillets. The curve is composed of quarter-circles; the upper or concave portion of the has its center without, while the lower curve has its center within the moulding. Both centers are on the same horizontal line. This moulding is frequently called an <em>Ogee</em>.

Cyma Recta

A roman moulding, called a Cyma Recta. It is a moulding of double curvature and two fillets.…

A roman moulding, called a <em>Cyma Reversa.</em> This like the cyma recta, is composed of two quarter circles and an upper and lower fillet. It is distinguished from the former by having its convex part above and the concave part below a horizontal center line.

Cyma Reversa

A roman moulding, called a Cyma Reversa. This like the cyma recta, is composed of two quarter…

"Fragment of the Entrance-Fa&ccedil;ade of the Palace of Diocletian at Spalatro. The tendency of the period of decadence is particularly illustrated by the introduction of small shafts resting on brackets, which serve no other purpose than to adorn and enliven the fa&ccedil;ade. Between these small shafts are alternate windows, with a semicircular head and niches of various shapes.

Entrance Façade of Diocletian's Palace

"Fragment of the Entrance-Façade of the Palace of Diocletian at Spalatro. The tendency of the…

One of the earliest open-air theaters in Athens, Greece.

Theater of Dionysus

One of the earliest open-air theaters in Athens, Greece.

"The Dome of St. Peter's from the Janiculan." &mdash; Young, 1901

Dome of St. Peter's

"The Dome of St. Peter's from the Janiculan." — Young, 1901

Atrium of the House of Ceres at Pompeii.

Domus

Atrium of the House of Ceres at Pompeii.

In the Middle East, it is customary to take your shoes off before entering a building.

Doorway

In the Middle East, it is customary to take your shoes off before entering a building.

Themoe of Diocletian.

Doric Order

Themoe of Diocletian.

"An artificial channel formed to carry off any stagnany body of water, like the sluices in modern use. Some works of this kind are among the most remarkable efforts of Roman ingenuity. That through which the waters of the lake Fucinus discharged themselves into the Liris, is represented in the preceding woodcut." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Emissarium

"An artificial channel formed to carry off any stagnany body of water, like the sluices in modern use.…

A ornate Roman engraving.

Roman engraving

A ornate Roman engraving.

Simple styles, such as the Doric, which accorded so intimately with the whole disposition of the Grecian temple, and the Ionic, were but rarely used; whilst, on the other hand, the Corinthian order was extremely prevalent, for it corresponded to the desire for splendor and magnificence. This order was employed, not, as among the Greeks, in small dimensions, but on the largest scale.

Corinthian Entablature from the Nerva at Rome

Simple styles, such as the Doric, which accorded so intimately with the whole disposition of the Grecian…

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra and other gates at Perugia; so also in the Cloacæ at Rome, of which the Cloaca Maxima is 20 feet broad. These are sewers which were intended to render the marshy district between the hills of Rome inhabitable. They were constructed in the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, at the beginning of the sixth century B.C.

Etruscan Arch at Perugia

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra…

Etruscan pilaster cap.

Etruscan Pilaster Cap

Etruscan pilaster cap.