The Ancient Greece ClipArt gallery offers 335 illustration of Greek history, events, and scenes of everyday life. For related images, please see Greek Mythology, Greek Architecture, Greek Ornament, Greek Coins, and the Ancient Greek Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

This illustration shows the Death of Priam, by Benvenuto.

Priam

This illustration shows the Death of Priam, by Benvenuto.

"From the Frieze of the Parthenon." — Smith, 1882

Panathenaic procession

"From the Frieze of the Parthenon." — Smith, 1882

"A dagger; a two-edged knife, commonly of bronze, with the handle in many cases variously ornamented or enriched." — Smith, 1873

Pugio

"A dagger; a two-edged knife, commonly of bronze, with the handle in many cases variously ornamented…

"A casket, a jewel-box. Quintilian produces this term as an example of catachresis, because it properly denoted that which was made of box, but was applied to things of similar form and use made of any other material. In fact, the caskets in which the ladies of ancient times kept their jewels and other ornaments, were made of gold, silver, ivory, mother of pearl, tortoise shell, etc. They were also much enriched with sculpture. A silver coffer, two feet long, one and a half wide, and one deep, most elaborately adorned with figures in bar-relief, is described by Bottiger. The annexed woodcut, from the antique, represents a plain jewel-box, out of which a dove is extracting a riband or fillet." — Smith, 1873

Pyxis

"A casket, a jewel-box. Quintilian produces this term as an example of catachresis, because it properly…

"The race course at Sparta."—Colby, 1899

Race Course

"The race course at Sparta."—Colby, 1899

"The battering ram was a large beam, made of the trunk of a tree, and having a mass of bronze or iron fastened to one end, and resembling a ram's head. This shape, as well as its name, was given to the engine in question, on account of the resemblence of its mode of action to that of a ram butting with its forehead. In an improved form, the ram was surrounded with iron bands, to which rings were attached for the purpose of suspending it by ropes or chains to a beam fixed transversely over it. See the lower figure." — Anthon, 1891

Battering ram

"The battering ram was a large beam, made of the trunk of a tree, and having a mass of bronze or iron…

"A net. In hunting it was usual to extend nets in a curved line of considerable length, so as in part to suround a space into which the beasts of chase were driven through the opening left on one side. The range of nets was flanked by cords, to which feathers dyed scarlet, and of other bright colours, were tied, so as to flare and flutter in the wind. The hunters then sallied forth with their dogs, dislodged the animals from their coverts, and by shouts and barking drove them first within the formido, as the apparatus of string and feathers was called, and then, as they were scared with this appearance, within the circuit of the nets. The accompanying woodcuts are taken from two bas-reliefs in the collection of ancient marbles at Ince-Blundell in Lancashire." — Smith, 1873

Retis

"A net. In hunting it was usual to extend nets in a curved line of considerable length, so as in part…

"In this woodcut, two men are carrying the net home after the chase, and hold in their hands two of the forked stakes for supporting it." — Smith, 1873

Retis

"In this woodcut, two men are carrying the net home after the chase, and hold in their hands two of…

Colossus at Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the World

Colossus at Rhodes

Colossus at Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the World

Statue of the Greek god Helios. It is currently considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. It was one of the tallest statues during its time, standing at over 30 meters (107 feet).

Colossus at Rhodes

Statue of the Greek god Helios. It is currently considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient…

A buckler, or small round shield.

Rondache

A buckler, or small round shield.

A bay that connects with the Saronic Gulf to the west.

The Bay of Salamis

A bay that connects with the Saronic Gulf to the west.

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise which goes by that name in modern times. It may be divided into two kinds, gymnastic and mimetic; that is, it was intended either to represent bodily activity, or to express by gestures, movements, and attitudes, certain ideas or feelings, and also single events or a series of events, as in the modern ballet. All these movements, however, were accompanied by music; but the term saltatio was used in a so much wider sense than our word dancing, that they applied to disignate gestures, even when the body did not move at all. We find dancing prevalent among the Greeks from the earliest times. It was originally closely connected with religion. In all the public festivals, which were so numerous among the Greeks, dancing formed a very prominent part. We find from the earliest times that the worship of Apollo was connected with a religious dance, called Hyporchema. All the religious dances, with the exception of the bacchic and the Corybantian, were very simple, and consisted of gentle movements of the body, with various turnings and windings around the altar; such a dance was the Geranus, which Theseus is said to have performed at Delos on his return from Crete." — Smith, 1873

Salatio

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise…

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise which goes by that name in modern times. It may be divided into two kinds, gymnastic and mimetic; that is, it was intended either to represent bodily activity, or to express by gestures, movements, and attitudes, certain ideas or feelings, and also single events or a series of events, as in the modern ballet. All these movements, however, were accompanied by music; but the term saltatio was used in a so much wider sense than our word dancing, that they applied to disignate gestures, even when the body did not move at all. We find dancing prevalent among the Greeks from the earliest times. It was originally closely connected with religion. In all the public festivals, which were so numerous among the Greeks, dancing formed a very prominent part. We find from the earliest times that the worship of Apollo was connected with a religious dance, called Hyporchema. All the religious dances, with the exception of the bacchic and the Corybantian, were very simple, and consisted of gentle movements of the body, with various turnings and windings around the altar; such a dance was the Geranus, which Theseus is said to have performed at Delos on his return from Crete." — Smith, 1873

Salatio

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise…

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise which goes by that name in modern times. It may be divided into two kinds, gymnastic and mimetic; that is, it was intended either to represent bodily activity, or to express by gestures, movements, and attitudes, certain ideas or feelings, and also single events or a series of events, as in the modern ballet. All these movements, however, were accompanied by music; but the term saltatio was used in a so much wider sense than our word dancing, that they applied to disignate gestures, even when the body did not move at all. We find dancing prevalent among the Greeks from the earliest times. It was originally closely connected with religion. In all the public festivals, which were so numerous among the Greeks, dancing formed a very prominent part. We find from the earliest times that the worship of Apollo was connected with a religious dance, called Hyporchema. All the religious dances, with the exception of the bacchic and the Corybantian, were very simple, and consisted of gentle movements of the body, with various turnings and windings around the altar; such a dance was the Geranus, which Theseus is said to have performed at Delos on his return from Crete." — Smith, 1873

Salatio

"Dancing. The dancing of the Greeks as well as of the Romans had very little in common with the exercise…

A Greek statue.

Victory of Samothreace

A Greek statue.

A group of women, with a lyre and wreath.

Sappho

A group of women, with a lyre and wreath.

"Sarcophagus from the Street of Tombs at Assos in the Troad, excavated by the Archaeological Institute of America." -Whitney, 1911

Sarcophagus

"Sarcophagus from the Street of Tombs at Assos in the Troad, excavated by the Archaeological Institute…

An ancient Greek sceptre from Tarentum.

Ancient Greek sceptre

An ancient Greek sceptre from Tarentum.

Gold and crystal sceptres from Mycanæ.

Mycanæ:n sceptres

Gold and crystal sceptres from Mycanæ.

"Sceptrum, which originally denoted a simple staff or walking stick, was emblematic of station and authority. In ancient authors the sceptre is represented as belonging more especially to kings, princes, and leaders of tribes: but it is also borne by judges, by heralds, and by priests and seers. The sceptre descended from father to son, and might be committed to any one in order to express the transfer of authority. Those who bore the sceptre swore by it, solemnly taking it in the right hand and raising it towards heaven. The following cut, representing Aeneas followed by Ascanius and carrying off his father Anchises, who holds the sceptre in his right hand, shows its form as worn by kings. The ivory sceptre of the kings of Rome, which descended to the consuls, was surmounted by an eagle." — Smith, 1873

Sceptrum

"Sceptrum, which originally denoted a simple staff or walking stick, was emblematic of station and authority.…

An Athenian youth, studying

School

An Athenian youth, studying

"Greek school - from a vase painting." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Greek school

"Greek school - from a vase painting." — The Delphian Society, 1913

One of the first Greek amphitheaters, located in the political center of the Elymian people.

Theater of Segesta

One of the first Greek amphitheaters, located in the political center of the Elymian people.

In Greek legends, the sea nymphs that were seated on the island of the Sirens, off the southwest coast of Italy.

Siren

In Greek legends, the sea nymphs that were seated on the island of the Sirens, off the southwest coast…

Greek soldier with sling.

Sling

Greek soldier with sling.

"Soccus was nearly if not altogether equivalent in meaning to Crepida, and denoted a slipper or low shoe, which did not fit closely, and was not fastened by any tie. The Soccus was worn by comic actors and was in this respect opposed to the Cothurnus. The preceding cut represents a buffoon, who is dancing in slippers." — Smith, 1873

Soccus

"Soccus was nearly if not altogether equivalent in meaning to Crepida, and denoted a slipper or low…

A classical Greek philosopher. He has become known for his contribution to the field of ethics, and is credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy.

Socrates

A classical Greek philosopher. He has become known for his contribution to the field of ethics, and…

"Figure of a fallen warrior, represented among the sculptures now at Munich, belonging to the temple in Aegina. In consequence of the bending of the knees, the greaves are seen to project a little above them. The statue also shows very distinctly the ankle-rings." — Anthon, 1891

Fallen soldier

"Figure of a fallen warrior, represented among the sculptures now at Munich, belonging to the temple…

"Greek Soldier. (From an ancient Vase.)" — Smith, 1882

Greek soldier

"Greek Soldier. (From an ancient Vase.)" — Smith, 1882

"The early Greeks used a very short sword, as may be seen from the preceding cut. The ancient Homeric sword had generally a straight, two-edged blade, rather broad, and nearly of equal width from hilt to point." — Anthon, 1891

Greek soldier

"The early Greeks used a very short sword, as may be seen from the preceding cut. The ancient Homeric…

An ancient Greek soldier.

Greek soldier

An ancient Greek soldier.

"A group of Greek soldiers, drawn from sculptured figures in the temple pediment."—Gordy, 1912

Greek Soldiers

"A group of Greek soldiers, drawn from sculptured figures in the temple pediment."—Gordy, 1912

"'Exulting in the tawny covering of a she-wolf, such as his foster-parent was.' Alluding to the custom on the part of the ancient heroes of arraying themselves in the skins of wild animals, in order to strike more terror into the foe and of either making a part of the hide answer the purposes of a helmet, or decking the helmet with it, <em>Genetricis</em>." — Anthon, 1891

Greek soldiers

"'Exulting in the tawny covering of a she-wolf, such as his foster-parent was.' Alluding to the custom…

"Solon's Tablets." &mdash; Quackenbos, 1882

Solons Tablets

"Solon's Tablets." — Quackenbos, 1882

"Sophocles" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Sophocles

"Sophocles" — Morey, 1903

"Speculum, a mirror, a looking-glass. The looking-glasses of the ancients were usually made of metal, at first of a composition of tin and copper, but afterwards more frequently of silver. The ancients seem to have had glass mirrors also like ours, consisting of a glass plate covered at the back with a thin leaf of metal. They were manufactured as early as the time of Pliny at the celebrated glass-houses at Sidon, but they must have been inferior to those of metal, since they never came into general use, and are never mentioned by ancient writers among costly pieces of furniture, whereas metal mirrors frequently are. Looking-glasses were generally small, and such as could by carried in the hand. Instead of their being fixed so as to be hung against the wall or to stand upon the table or floor, they were generally held by female slaves before their mistresses when dressing. The general form of looking-glasses is shown in the following wood-cut." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Speculum

"Speculum, a mirror, a looking-glass. The looking-glasses of the ancients were usually made of metal,…

"Stilus or Stylus conveys the general idea of an object tapering like an architectural column. It signifies: 1. An iron instrument, resembling a pencil in size and shape, used for writing upon waxed tablets. At one end it was sharpened to a point for scratching the characters upon the wax, while the other end, being flat and circular, served to render the surface of the tablets smooth again, and so to obliterate what had been written. Thus, vertere stilum means to erase, and hence to correct. The stylus was also termed graphium, and the case in which it was kept graphiarium. 2. A sharp stake or spike placed in pitfalls before an entrenchment, to embarrass the progress of an attacking enemy." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Stilus

"Stilus or Stylus conveys the general idea of an object tapering like an architectural column. It signifies:…

A prehistoric symbol found on the cover of an ancient vase at Troy.

The Swastika

A prehistoric symbol found on the cover of an ancient vase at Troy.

"Symposium, a drinking-party. The symposium must be distunguished from the deipnon, for though drinking almost always followed a dinner-party, yet the former was regarded as entirely distinct from the latter, was regulated by different customs, and frequently received the addition of many guests, who were not present at the dinner. For the Greeks did not usually drink at their dinner, and it was not till the conclusion of the meal that wine was introduced." &mdash Smith; 1873

Symposium

"Symposium, a drinking-party. The symposium must be distunguished from the deipnon, for though drinking…

"Syrinx, the Pan's pipe, or Pandean pipe, was the appropriate musical instrument of the Arcadian and other Grecian shepherds, and was regarded by them as the invention of Pan, their tutelary god. When the Roman poets had occasion to mention it, they called it fistula. It was formed in general of seven hollow stems of cane or reed, fitted together by means of wax, having been previously cut to the proper lengths, and adjusted so as to form an octave; but sometimes nine were admitted, giving an equal number of notes." &mdash Smith; 1873

Syrinx

"Syrinx, the Pan's pipe, or Pandean pipe, was the appropriate musical instrument of the Arcadian and…

"Talus. The huckle-bones of sheep and goats were used to play with from the earliest times, principally by women and children, occasionally by old men. The following cut, taken from an ancient painting, represents a woman, who, having thrown the bones upwards into the air, has caught three of them on the back of her hand. When the sides of the bone were marked with different values, the game became one of chance. The two ends were left blank, because the bone could not rest upon either of them on account of its curvature. The four remaining sides were marked with numbers 1, 3, 4, 5; 1 and 6 being on two opposite sides, and 3 and 4 on the other two opposite sides. Two persons played together at this game, using four bones, which they threw up into the air, or emptied out of a dice-box, and observing the numbers on the uppermost sides. " &mdash Smith; 1873

Talus

"Talus. The huckle-bones of sheep and goats were used to play with from the earliest times, principally…

"This was a small round shield, made of the hide ofa quadruped." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Targe

"This was a small round shield, made of the hide ofa quadruped." — Anthon, 1891

The Temple of Minerva in Athens.

Temple

The Temple of Minerva in Athens.

"West Front of Temple at Aegina" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Temple Aegina

"West Front of Temple at Aegina" — Morey, 1903

Temple at Assus, Greece.

Temple at Assus

Temple at Assus, Greece.

"The temple of Diana was the chief glory of the city. The style was Grecian. The length of the ground-plan was four-hundred and twenty-five feet and the breadth two-hundred and twenty feet. The structure was thus four times as large as the Pantheon at Athens. The statue of the goddess was one of the finest works of art ever produced. It was wrought of ivory and gold, and was a marvel of costliness and beauty. The temple was decorated with sculptures by Praxiteles and one of the masterpieces of Apelles. A representation of the temple was stamped on the coins and medals of the city."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Temple of Diana at Ephesus

"The temple of Diana was the chief glory of the city. The style was Grecian. The length of the ground-plan…

Temple of Jupiter at Olympia.

Temple of Jupiter

Temple of Jupiter at Olympia.

An ancient Greek temple devoted to the god Neptune.

Temple of Neptune

An ancient Greek temple devoted to the god Neptune.

One of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. They were held both the year before and the year after the Olympic Games.

The Isthmian Games

One of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. They were held both the year before and the year after…

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek Goddess Athena, who was considered as the protector of the city of Athens. The Temple was built in the 5th B.C. on Athenian Acropolis. The Parthenon is designed in a Doric Order style which consists of vertical columns that stand flat without a base, and a smooth capital.

The Parthenon

The Parthenon is a temple of the Greek Goddess Athena, who was considered as the protector of the city…

The theater of Athens where Greek drama was born.

Theater of Athens

The theater of Athens where Greek drama was born.

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

Theater of Dionysus

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

"The fame of Theocritus, the prince of bucolic poetry, depends on his faithful pictures of natural scenery and the common Sicilian people. He is generally considered the only poet of the Alexandrean epoch whose works can rank with the brilliant Grecian songs of earlier days." &mdash; The Delphian Society, 1913

Theocritus

"The fame of Theocritus, the prince of bucolic poetry, depends on his faithful pictures of natural scenery…

Battle of Thermopylae

Battle of Thermopylae

Battle of Thermopylae

Also known as the Temple of Hephaestus. An ancient Athenian temple built about 440 B.C.

Theseum

Also known as the Temple of Hephaestus. An ancient Athenian temple built about 440 B.C.

"The Temple of Theseus at Athens." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Temple of Theseus

"The Temple of Theseus at Athens." —D'Anvers, 1895

"Thrones, a throne, is a Greek word, for which the proper Latin term is Solium. This did not differ from a chair except in being higher, larger, and in all respects more magnificent. On account of its elevation it was always necessarily accompanied by a footstool. The accompanying cut shows two gilded thrones with cushions and drapery, intended to be the thrones of Mars and Venus, which is expressed by the helmet on the one and the dove on the other." &mdash Smith; 1873

Thrones

"Thrones, a throne, is a Greek word, for which the proper Latin term is Solium. This did not differ…

"The following wood-cut from a fictile vase in the Museo Borbonico at Naples, represents Juno seated on a splendid throne, which is elevated on a basement. She holds in her left hand a sceptre, and in her right the apple, which Mercury is about to convey to Paris with a view to the celebrated contest for beauty on Mount Ida. Mercury is distinguished by his talaria, his caduceus, and his petasus thrown behind his back, and hanging b a string. On the right side of the throne is the representation of a tigress or panther." &mdash Smith; 1873

Thrones

"The following wood-cut from a fictile vase in the Museo Borbonico at Naples, represents Juno seated…

"Thyrsus, a pole carried by Bacchus, and by Satyrs, Maenades, and others who engaged in Bacchic festivities and rites. It was sometimes terminated by the apple of the pine, or fir-cone, that tree being dedicated to Bacchus in consequence of the use of the turpentine which flowed from it, and also of its cones, in making wine. The monuments of ancient art, however, most commonly exhibit, instead of the pine-apple, a bunch of vine or ivy leaves, with grapes or berries, arranged into the form of a cone. The annexed cut shows the head of a thyrsus composed of the leaves and berries of the ivy, and surrounded by acanthus leaves. The fabulous history of Bacchus relates that he converted the thyrsi carried by himself and his followers into dangerous weapons, by concealing an iron point in the head of the leaves." &mdash Smith; 1873

Thyrsus

"Thyrsus, a pole carried by Bacchus, and by Satyrs, Maenades, and others who engaged in Bacchic festivities…