"Nautical-with ends pointing upward. Image: Man-of-war with Yards a-cockbill."-Whitney, 1902

A-cockbill

"Nautical-with ends pointing upward. Image: Man-of-war with Yards a-cockbill."-Whitney, 1902

"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square, so that a wooden stock may be fitted temporarily if the iron stock is damaged, and that its proportions and form have been carefully considered and definately fixed." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Admiralty's Anchor

"The Admiralty anchor differs only from the ordinary anchor in having a nut, a, worked on the square,…

"Common Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor

"Common Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

"Trotman's Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor

"Trotman's Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

"Martin's Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor

"Martin's Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

"Mushroom Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor

"Mushroom Anchor."-Whitney, 1902

"Medieval Tie-rod Anchors."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor

"Medieval Tie-rod Anchors."-Whitney, 1902

The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron and its form... resembled that of the modern anchor." — Anthon, 1891

Anchor

The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron and its form... resembled that of…

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and just below the ring is a transverse piece called the stock, s s; the other extremity is the crown, c, from which branch out two arms or blades, g, in directions nearly at right angles to that of the stock; each arm spreads out into a broad palm or fluke, h, the sharp extremity of which is the peak or bill, k." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Anchor

"The vertical or supporting beam of the A. is the shank, B; at the upper end of it is the ring, r; and…

An anchor is an object, often made out of metal, that is used to attach a ship to the bottom of a body of water at a specific point.

Anchor

An anchor is an object, often made out of metal, that is used to attach a ship to the bottom of a body…

"This charge is borne with a cable, and set fesse-wise, by the British Admiralty; but it is usual to place it in pale, and it depicted without a cable, unless the contrary is specified."—Aveling, 1891

Anchor

"This charge is borne with a cable, and set fesse-wise, by the British Admiralty; but it is usual to…

An anchor which is an instrument used for retaining a ship in a particular spot.  a, a, stock; b, shank; c, c, flukes; d, d, arms.

Anchor

An anchor which is an instrument used for retaining a ship in a particular spot. a, a, stock; b, shank;…

"The bow or clevis, with two eyes and a screwbolt, or bolt and key, which is used for securing a cable to the ring of the anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor Shackles

"The bow or clevis, with two eyes and a screwbolt, or bolt and key, which is used for securing a cable…

"Anchorage of a cable of the East River Bridge, New York."-Whitney, 1902

Anchorage

"Anchorage of a cable of the East River Bridge, New York."-Whitney, 1902

"The anchor-shaped calcareous spicules which are attached to and protrude from the flat perforated calcareous plates in the integument of echinoderms of the genus."-Whitney, 1902

Ancora

"The anchor-shaped calcareous spicules which are attached to and protrude from the flat perforated calcareous…

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled that of the modern anchor. The shape of the two extremities illustrates the unco morsu and dente tenaci of Virgil. Indeed, the Greek and Latin names themselves express the essential property of the anchor being allied to angelus and uncus. The anchor as here represented and as commonly used, was called bidens, because it had two teeth or flukes. Sometimes it had one only, and then it had the epithet." — Smith, 1873

Ancora

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled…

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled that of the modern anchor. Galley with the Cable to which the Anchor is attached passing through the Oculus in the Prow." — Smith, 1873

Ancora

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled…

"Bayeux Tapestry. Harold coming to anchor on the coast of Normandy." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Bayeux Tapestry

"Bayeux Tapestry. Harold coming to anchor on the coast of Normandy." — Chambers' Encyclopedia,…

"Bayeux Tapestry. The crown offered to Harold by the people." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Bayeux Tapestry

"Bayeux Tapestry. The crown offered to Harold by the people." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

"Bayeux Tapestry. Battle of Hastings." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Bayeux Tapestry

"Bayeux Tapestry. Battle of Hastings." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in place by two chains, a and b, termed the cat-stopper and shank vainter respectively, each of which is fitted with a long link at one end. A bolt b, about 5 or 6 inches long, is fixed on the side of the cathead, on a hinge at its lower end; it is held in the upright position by another bolt c, which passes through the cathead, and is worked by a lever d; d is provided with a hole at the end for a lanyard, so that two or three men can pull it. This whole arrangement is termed a slip-stopper. A somewhat similar combination of bolts and levers is fitted close tot he bill-board D, e being a short bolt secured at its lower end with a hinge to the ship's side; and f a hooked lever which holds it in its upright position; f has a socket at its inboard end, to which a shifting arm, provided with a lanyard like the lever d, is fitted." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bower Anchor

"A, is the cathead; B, the fish davit; C, and E, bollards; D, the bill-board. The anchor is held in…

A machine used for raising anchors on ships.

Capstan

A machine used for raising anchors on ships.

"Mooring anchors are those which are places in harbours, for the convenience of vessels frequenting them. A large buoy is attached to the end of the mooring cable, and the ship is made fast to a ring-bolt fitted on the buoy. Mooring anchors are not limited by considerations of weight, as other anchors are, he only requirements being that they have sufficient holding power, and do not project above the ground, as any projection in the shallow waters in which they are usually placed would render ships liable to injury from grounding on them, and be dangerous to fishing-nets." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Cast-iron Mooring Anchor

"Mooring anchors are those which are places in harbours, for the convenience of vessels frequenting…

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and the shackle are attached; d is the crown; de and df the arms; gg the palms or flukes; the pee, the bill or the point is the extreme end of the arm beyond the palm; the blade is the part of the arm at the back of the palm; h is the shackle or ring to which the cable is attahed; kl is the stock, placed at right angles to the plane or the arms and shank." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Common Anchor

"The shank is the straight part, ab; the square, ac, is that part of the shank to which the stock and…

"A massive square framework of wood, mounted on six sarp disc wheels, each about two feet in diameter, which cut deep into the ground, and on the lightest land they can hold as effectually to resist the pull of the rope which is passed around the sheave beneath." — Chambers, 1881

Fowler's Anchor

"A massive square framework of wood, mounted on six sarp disc wheels, each about two feet in diameter,…

"Forler's Anchor, Engine, and Plough at work." — Chambers, 1881

Fowler's Inventions

"Forler's Anchor, Engine, and Plough at work." — Chambers, 1881

"Grapnel. A boat's anchor having from three to six flukes placed at equal distances about the end of the shank. Also grapline." -Whitney, 1911

Grapnel

"Grapnel. A boat's anchor having from three to six flukes placed at equal distances about the end of…

The seal of the state of Maine. The seal has a farmer with his scythe and a sailor with his anchor. Above the shield is the state motto 'Dirigo' meaning "I lead."

Seal of Maine

The seal of the state of Maine. The seal has a farmer with his scythe and a sailor with his anchor.…

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

Marine Recreation Area, Black and White

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

Marine Recreation Area, Color

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

Marine Recreation Area, Outline

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

Marine Recreation Area, Silhouette

This sign indicates that a marine recreation area is located nearby.

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The shank is made in one forging, is of rectangular section, having a shoulder for the stock to fit against, and is increased both in thickness and area at the crown; the arms with the palms are forged in one piece, and then bent to the required shape; one of the arms is passed through a hole in the crown and is kept in position by a bolt screwed through the end of the crown, so that its point reaches a little way into an indent made for it in the round part at the back of the arms." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Martin's Anchor

"The anchor is represented in the position in which it lies on the ground just before taking hold. The…

"Mushroom anchors, first proposed for ships, are now only used for moorings." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Mushroom Anchor

"Mushroom anchors, first proposed for ships, are now only used for moorings." — Encyclopedia Britanica,…

The Seal of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, 1636. The seal shows a maritime anchor and the word "Hope."

Seal of Rhode Island

The Seal of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, 1636. The seal shows a maritime anchor…

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the shank instead of passing through it. It is somewhat heavier than the stocks of other anchors; the arms are shorter than usual in proportion to the length of the shank, and are of a wedge shape, varying in sharpness from the throat to the head of the palms; the back part of the arms is parallel from palm to palm; the palm is double concave on the front, and has a small border at the edge for confining the soil through which it is dragged." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Rodger's Anchor

"The stock is of iron in large as well as small anchors, and is made with a mortice, to fit over the…

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat larger at the center than at the ends, and is made fork-shaped at one end to receive the arms; the arms are in one piece, and are connected to the shank by a bolt passing through their center." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Trotman's Anchor

"The stock is of iron, similar to the Admiralty anchor; the shank is of rectangular section, somewhat…

The pipe wrench is an adjustable wrench used for turning soft iron pipes and fittings with a rounded surface. The design of the adjustable jaw allows it to rock in the frame, such that any forward pressure on the handle tends to pull the jaws tighter together

Pipe Wrench

The pipe wrench is an adjustable wrench used for turning soft iron pipes and fittings with a rounded…