"This charge is borne with a cable, and set fesse-wise, by the British Admiralty; but it is usual to place it in pale, and it depicted without a cable, unless the contrary is specified."—Aveling, 1891

Anchor

"This charge is borne with a cable, and set fesse-wise, by the British Admiralty; but it is usual to…

"From annulus, a ring. A mark of difference of the fifth son."—Aveling, 1891

Annulet

"From annulus, a ring. A mark of difference of the fifth son."—Aveling, 1891

The heraldic charge borne by the fifth eldest son in a family.

The Annulet

The heraldic charge borne by the fifth eldest son in a family.

Illustration of a cross section of a westfield seek-no-further apple.

Westfield Seek-No-Further Apple

Illustration of a cross section of a westfield seek-no-further apple.

Illustration of a westfield seek-no-further apple.

Westfield Seek-No-Further Apple

Illustration of a westfield seek-no-further apple.

"Argent, a fess gules" describes the red (gules) stripe (fess) on the silver (argent) field.

Argent, a Fess Gules

"Argent, a fess gules" describes the red (gules) stripe (fess) on the silver (argent) field.

"Ermine, two bars gules. BAR. An honourable ordinary, occupying one-fifth of the shield. It may be placed in any part of the field. It has two diminutives, the closet and barrulet." -Hall, 1862

Bar Ordinary

"Ermine, two bars gules. BAR. An honourable ordinary, occupying one-fifth of the shield. It may be placed…

Barnyard with cow and hen.

Barnyard

Barnyard with cow and hen.

"Base Ball is a field game played principally in the United States. It originated in the English school-boy game of "rounders;" but it has been so improved and so generally played as to merit its name of "the National game of America." The plaing of baseball has become largely a business or a "profession," and skilled players receive large salaries. As an amateur game, however, it is also most popular."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Baseball Diamond

"Base Ball is a field game played principally in the United States. It originated in the English school-boy…

A boy on his way to the baseball field. Younger boys wave to him as he walks along.

Baseball Uniform

A boy on his way to the baseball field. Younger boys wave to him as he walks along.

An umpire flips a coin and calls out, "heads or tails!" as the children look on.

Baseball, Heads or Tails

An umpire flips a coin and calls out, "heads or tails!" as the children look on.

"Formed by lines drawn horizontally, crossed by others drawn diagonally."—Aveling, 1891

Barry Bendy

"Formed by lines drawn horizontally, crossed by others drawn diagonally."—Aveling, 1891

"Produced by lines drawn vertically, by others drawn diagonally, or by a compound of Paly and Bendy."—Aveling, 1891

Paly Bendy

"Produced by lines drawn vertically, by others drawn diagonally, or by a compound of Paly and Bendy."—Aveling,…

The angle between the Union II and VI Corps became known as the "Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania", where perhaps some of the most savage fighting of the whole Civil War took place.

Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania

The angle between the Union II and VI Corps became known as the "Bloody Angle of Spotsylvania", where…

A pile of books in a field, under the sun.

Books

A pile of books in a field, under the sun.

An illustration of a boy asleep in a field surrounded by dogs.

Sleeping Boy Surrounded by Dogs

An illustration of a boy asleep in a field surrounded by dogs.

An illustration of a young boy sitting in a field who looks like he was painting a cow. He looks frightened by the viewer's presence.

Painting Boy

An illustration of a young boy sitting in a field who looks like he was painting a cow. He looks frightened…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." —Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

"The canton is a square part of the escutcheon, usually occupying about one-eighth of the field; it is placed over the chief at the dexter side of the shield: it may be charged, and when this is the case, its size may be increased. The canton represents the banner of the ancient Knights Banneret. The canton in the example is marked A." -Hall, 1862

Canton Ordinary

"The canton is a square part of the escutcheon, usually occupying about one-eighth of the field; it…

"Chequée is when the field is divided by lines perpendicular and horizontal, crossing each other, the squares formed by these lines being blazoned of two tinctures arranged alternately."—Aveling, 1891

Chequée

"Chequée is when the field is divided by lines perpendicular and horizontal, crossing each other,…

Children picking berries in a field.

Children picking berries

Children picking berries in a field.

A white clover plant grown from a single seed, showing spreading habit.

White clover

A white clover plant grown from a single seed, showing spreading habit.

A field of coffee and tobacco in Puerto Rico.

Coffee and Tobacco Lands

A field of coffee and tobacco in Puerto Rico.

"A field of any charge divided into a row of small squares."—Aveling, 1891

Componée

"A field of any charge divided into a row of small squares."—Aveling, 1891

"Degraded means placed upon degrees, or steps."—Aveling, 1891

Cross Nowed, Degraded and Conjoined

"Degraded means placed upon degrees, or steps."—Aveling, 1891

"Counter-componée has two rows of squares, with a metal and color alternating."—Aveling, 1891

Counter-Componée

"Counter-componée has two rows of squares, with a metal and color alternating."—Aveling,…

Three cows in a field.

Cows

Three cows in a field.

"A half-moon shaped charge, with its horns turned upwards."—Aveling, 1891

Crescent

"A half-moon shaped charge, with its horns turned upwards."—Aveling, 1891

The heraldic charge borne by the second eldest son in a family.

The Crescent

The heraldic charge borne by the second eldest son in a family.

"Another species of cricket is the Field-cricket, a timid animal which avoids the society of man, living all year round in the burrows which it forms in sandy banks among the stones. This is much larger and louder in its song than the domestic species, but it is by no means so common, frequentling only hot sandy districts." — Goodrich, 1859

Field Cricket

"Another species of cricket is the Field-cricket, a timid animal which avoids the society of man, living…

A Cross double-parted.

Cross Double-Parted

A Cross double-parted.

A Cross engrailed.

Cross Engrailed

A Cross engrailed.

A Cross flamant.

Cross Flamant

A Cross flamant.

"A Cross Fleury, or Fleurie, is borne in the arms of Lord Brougham and Vaux. It is not very unlike the Cross Patonce, but the extremities are less spreading."—Aveling, 1891

Cross Fleury

"A Cross Fleury, or Fleurie, is borne in the arms of Lord Brougham and Vaux. It is not very unlike the…

A heraldic shield with a charge of a cross with four ermine spots.

Cross of Four Ermine Spots

A heraldic shield with a charge of a cross with four ermine spots.

A heraldic shield with a Cross patée charge.

Cross Patée

A heraldic shield with a Cross patée charge.

A variation of the heraldic charge Cross patée, with concave colors.

Cross Patée Concaved

A variation of the heraldic charge Cross patée, with concave colors.

"Cross Quarterly is a Cross cut by a partition line, and the tinctures reversed or counter-changed."—Aveling, 1891

Cross Quarterly

"Cross Quarterly is a Cross cut by a partition line, and the tinctures reversed or counter-changed."—Aveling,…

"A Cross voided is not unlike the Cross double parted, but the bars do not run through or across the shield. It is, in fact, the Cross of St. George with the central area removed, so that only a thin outline remains."—Aveling, 1891

Cross Voided

"A Cross voided is not unlike the Cross double parted, but the bars do not run through or across the…

"It will be observed that the charge upon the shield in this instance is not the Cross, but the lozenges."—Aveling, 1891

Four Fusils in Cross

"It will be observed that the charge upon the shield in this instance is not the Cross, but the lozenges."—Aveling,…

"The Fimbriated Cross is a cross having a border of another tincture, generally for the purpose of allowing it, if it be of metal, to be placed upon a field of another metal; the fimbration, or intervening border, being of a color to prevent the violation of the rule that 'metal cannot be placed upon metal, or color upon color.'"—Aveling, 1891

Frimbriated Cross

"The Fimbriated Cross is a cross having a border of another tincture, generally for the purpose of allowing…

"A Cross crossed at the head."—Aveling, 1891

Patriarchal Cross

"A Cross crossed at the head."—Aveling, 1891

"An egg-shaped, ornamental, covered cup, with a circular pedestal and base."—Aveling, 1891

Covered Cup

"An egg-shaped, ornamental, covered cup, with a circular pedestal and base."—Aveling, 1891

This painting by Claude Gelle Le Lorrain is a great example of his technique. He uses the rustic, rural theme in several of his works.

Dance by the Riverside

This painting by Claude Gelle Le Lorrain is a great example of his technique. He uses the rustic, rural…

"The field spaniel, a dog to which very great attention has been paid by breeders and fanciers, who have lengthened its body and shortened its legs at the expense of symmetry."—Finley, 1917

Field Spaniel

"The field spaniel, a dog to which very great attention has been paid by breeders and fanciers, who…

"The dynamo has its field mangets F F magnetized by means of a small current flowing around a shunt circuit." — Hawkins, 1917

Dynamo

"The dynamo has its field mangets F F magnetized by means of a small current flowing around a shunt…

"The shunt wound dynamo differes from the series wound machine, in that an independent circuit is used for exciting its field magnet." — Hawkins, 1917

Shunt dynamo

"The shunt wound dynamo differes from the series wound machine, in that an independent circuit is used…

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

Shield of Edward I

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

"Naturalized in old fields and along roadsides." — Baily, 1898

Elecampane

"Naturalized in old fields and along roadsides." — Baily, 1898

"Thus, if we suppose the conducting wire be placed in a vertical situation, as shown, and p, n, the current of positive electricity to be descending through it, from p to n, and if throught the point c in the wire in the plane NN be taken, perpendicular to p, n, that is in the present case a horiczontal plane, then if any number of circles be described in that plane, having c for thier common centre, the action of the current on the wire on upon the north pole of the magnet, will be to move it in a direction corresponding to the motion of the hands of a watch, having the dial towards the positive pole of the battery." -Comstock 1850

Circular Motion of the [Electric] Fluid

"Thus, if we suppose the conducting wire be placed in a vertical situation, as shown, and p, n, the…

"When a charge is moved from any point to another point in the same equipotential surface, no work is done upon it. When a charge is moved from one such surface to another, the work done is independent of the path of transfer. If such a surface was to be rendered impenetrable, a particle could lie upon it without tendancy to move along it in any direction. If any two points in such a surface were to be joined by a conductor, no flow of electrification would take place. The closed lines are equipotential lines drawn, upon equipotential surfaces, about two similartly electrified spheres, the quantity of electrifaction at A being twice that at B." -Avery 1895

Equipotential Lines

"When a charge is moved from any point to another point in the same equipotential surface, no work is…

"In heraldry, represented as covered with escallop- or scallop-shells: said of the field; also, covered with an imbricated pattern of curving lines." -Whitney, 1911

Escalloped

"In heraldry, represented as covered with escallop- or scallop-shells: said of the field; also, covered…

"ESCUTCHEON. This word is sometimes used to express the whole coat of arms, sometimes only the field upon which the arms are painted. It more generally denotes the painted shields used at funerals. The field, if the husband is dead and wife survives, is black on the dexter side only; if the wife is deceased, it is black on the sinister side; if both, it is black all over. The example shows that this is the escutcheon of a deceased baron, whose lady survives." -Hall, 1862

Escutcheon

"ESCUTCHEON. This word is sometimes used to express the whole coat of arms, sometimes only the field…

The Evergreen is a story that was illustrated by Scottish artist John Duncan. The drawing seems to depict a couple playing music together outside on a field with lamb.

The Evergreen

The Evergreen is a story that was illustrated by Scottish artist John Duncan. The drawing seems to depict…

The shield of a knight of the time of Edward II. The lion's face is a common charge in heraldry.

Heraldic Shield with a Lion's Face

The shield of a knight of the time of Edward II. The lion's face is a common charge in heraldry.

A Brazilian farmhouse.

Brazilian farmhouse

A Brazilian farmhouse.

An illustration of an African American slave who works as a field hand.

Field Hand

An illustration of an African American slave who works as a field hand.

Field with tree and large sky.

Field with tree

Field with tree and large sky.

A farmer standing waist-deep in a field of buckwheat on land that was plowed early and well fitted.

Buckwheat field

A farmer standing waist-deep in a field of buckwheat on land that was plowed early and well fitted.

Farmer standing in a sparse and stunted field of buckwheat, which was on land that was plowed late.

Buckwheat field

Farmer standing in a sparse and stunted field of buckwheat, which was on land that was plowed late.