The picture describes a story about a traveler who encounters a terrible storm and because he cannot see very well through the rain, he falls into a ditch and breaks his leg. He sits in the ditch through the night, and when dawn breaks, he notices a broken bridge just ahead. He rejoices that he had fallen when he did instead of trying to cross a broken bridge.

'Tis All for the Best

The picture describes a story about a traveler who encounters a terrible storm and because he cannot…

"The horse moves very slow - he hangs his head, / He's traveled long till he's quite wearied. / The rider, thinking to relieve his nag, / On his own shoulders puts a heavy bad. / Short-sighted reasoner, who thinks, of course, / That such a change must greatly help the horse."—Barber, 1857

A Change, but No Relief

"The horse moves very slow - he hangs his head, / He's traveled long till he's quite wearied. / The…

"Not when the Sun of Fortune o'er us shines, / And flattery's tongue, with honeyed words, beguiles, / Then friends are plenty, smiles are easy bought, / And gifts, praise, kindly offers, come unsought, / And then our friends we prove, the trial hour / Comes when the Storm comes, with its chilling power. / The false ones, like the birds of summer, fly / 'At the stern touch of could Adversity.' / But those who seek us in our hour of need, / With nought to gain, are truly friends indeed; / Not like the priest, still passing in his pride, / With the cold Levite, on the other side, / But he, the good Samaritan, whose care / Shall heal our wounds, our heavy burdens share, / Who sees, with tearful eyes, the orphan's grief, / And gives the lonely widow sweet relief, / Such is the friend indeed, in our distress, / Would there were more Life's rugged path to bless!"—Barber, 1857

A Friend in Need, is a Friend Indeed

"Not when the Sun of Fortune o'er us shines, / And flattery's tongue, with honeyed words, beguiles,…

"The house-wife plies her needle and her thread, / Long after idle people are in bed; / The rent is small, but she full well doth know, / That little rents to larger ones will grow."—Barber, 1857

A Stitch in Time, Saves Nine

"The house-wife plies her needle and her thread, / Long after idle people are in bed; / The rent is…

"A long lost son seeks his lov'd home once more; / An heir of wealth, although in clothing poor: / The dogs fly at him; loud they're barking, / Those in the house are closely heark'ning, / Robbers they say are round, they greatly fear, / But soon a son and brother's voice they hear."—Barber, 1857

All Are Not Thieves that Dogs Bark At

"A long lost son seeks his lov'd home once more; / An heir of wealth, although in clothing poor: / The…

"The father flogs his disobedient son, / Who cries aloud to feel it must be done; / And though 'tis painful now, yet in the end, / He'll own his father is his kindest friend."—Barber, 1857

All is Well that Ends Well

"The father flogs his disobedient son, / Who cries aloud to feel it must be done; / And though 'tis…

The picture describes the story of a man who traveled across a frozen stream and, as a result, fell into the icy water. He was too trustworthy of appearances and did not realize that the ice was too thin to walk upon.

Appearances are Often Deceitful

The picture describes the story of a man who traveled across a frozen stream and, as a result, fell…

"If in the path of life, safe and correct you'd be, / Believe not all you hear, regard not all you see: / One says this way is right, the other says not so, / Come quickly here, this is the only path to go. / Be cautious all, abroad, mind where you tread, / Be not deceived, be sure you're right, then go ahead."—Barber, 1857

Be Sure Your Right, then Go Ahead

"If in the path of life, safe and correct you'd be, / Believe not all you hear, regard not all you see:…

"The tempest howls, the winds tremendous blow, / Whate'er bends not will surely be laid low: / Ofttimes 'tis vain to stem the current tide, / And when it dashes on, then step aside; / Or meekly, reed-like, bending to the storm, / The traveler thus will save himself from harm: / The stubborn traveler braves the storm in vain, / Its fury lays him prostate on the plain."—Barber, 1857

Better Bend than Break

"The tempest howls, the winds tremendous blow, / Whate'er bends not will surely be laid low: / Ofttimes…

"We have before us quite a strange ooking personage as to dress. The boy evidently has on him his father's or his grandfather's clothing. Whatever he may think of his own dignity, the public who see him showing off himself in this manner are either amused or disgusted with his appearance. The fact is, he has got on cloths which do not belong to him; they are borrowed for the occasion. His body is too small to have them fit him: he is like the daw in the back ground with its borrowed feathers. A man appears better in his own clothes, made for his wear, even if they are thread-bare, than those of another, even if they are more fashionable than his own. Every man has a way of his own for doing business, and this for him is the best way."—Barber, 1857

Borrowed Garments Never Fit Well

"We have before us quite a strange ooking personage as to dress. The boy evidently has on him his father's…

"While treading on our course this earthly ball, / We often stumble, and we sometimes fall: / 'Get above others.' says human nature, / But if we get too high, the fall is greater. / He that would 'scape great dangers far and nigh, / Will lowly walk, and will not climb too high."—Barber, 1857

Climb Not Too High, Lest the Fall be Greater

"While treading on our course this earthly ball, / We often stumble, and we sometimes fall: / 'Get above…

"This foolish, wayward youth, on mischief bent, / Disturbs a hive - this fun, he'll soon repent; / The bees fly quickly out, they sting him sore, / He wisdom learns, and touches bees no more. / The other boy, at a safe distance, more wise, / Sees trouble brewing - from the spot he flies."—Barber, 1857

Experience Teaches

"This foolish, wayward youth, on mischief bent, / Disturbs a hive - this fun, he'll soon repent; / The…

"The power of speaking to the eyes and heart, / Is great; and is indeed a wondrous art; / It mighty proves; it scorns the tyrant's power, / And will remain extant till earth's last hour: / And useful book may live from age to age, / And those unborn, may read its printed page."—Barber, 1857

Good Books Create Knowledge, Virtue, and Happiness

"The power of speaking to the eyes and heart, / Is great; and is indeed a wondrous art; / It mighty…

"At a low price these goods this man hath bought, / 'Pay as you go,' so he's been early taught: / By buying cheap, he thus can sell the same / At a low price, and thus a profit gain; / But he that always buys his goods on trust, / Pays prices more, and interest large he must, / But he that buys for cash, is truly told / Goods well and cheaply bought, and thus half sold."—Barber, 1857

Goods Well Bought, Are Half Sold

"At a low price these goods this man hath bought, / 'Pay as you go,' so he's been early taught: / By…

"Haste makes waste - how true! how much the cost, / The pitcher's broken, and the milk is lost; / With basket full, see how the man is toiling, / Quite hard he runs! the fruit is falling: / Look in the distance, and see the slaughter, / Made by running steam-boats o'er the water."—Barber, 1857

Haste Makes Waste

"Haste makes waste - how true! how much the cost, / The pitcher's broken, and the milk is lost; / With…

"A wayward youth in mischief takes delight, / A trick to put one in a sorry plight, / He deeply digs a pit; covers it all o'er, / And thinks he'll have him in his power; / But now, while he on this way is strolling, / Into his own trap, see now he's falling."—Barber, 1857

He Dug a Pit and Fell into it Himself

"A wayward youth in mischief takes delight, / A trick to put one in a sorry plight, / He deeply digs…

"See here's a man who is quite generous found, / His sunshine friends are gathered thick around, / From many parts they come, both far and near, / He fully feasts with them all with much good cheer; / To all who call, he makes himself their friend, / With feelings kind, he doth his money lend: / They eat him up - when some help he's wishing, / His numerous friends are fond among the missing."—Barber, 1857

He Makes Himself Sugar, the Flies Eat Him Up

"See here's a man who is quite generous found, / His sunshine friends are gathered thick around, / From…

"With crutches broke the cripple cannot go; / One that is close of sight doth pity the show; / The one that's lame, hath vision strong and clear, / He sees all dangers round, both far and near; / The one who's vision's dim, is hale and strong, / He carries the other with ease along: / By doing thus, an action, noble, kind, / Will to himself a greater blessing find."—Barber, 1857

He that Helps Another, Helps Himself

"With crutches broke the cripple cannot go; / One that is close of sight doth pity the show; / The one…

"Before a glowing fire, with slippered feet, / The full fed man sits on his cushioned seat; / When warm and smoking, then it is he's told / Of some of the poor people freezing with the cold; / He's quite surprised, and says he cannot see, / (Since he's so warm,) how such a thing can be."—Barber, 1857

He That Is Warm, Thinks All Are

"Before a glowing fire, with slippered feet, / The full fed man sits on his cushioned seat; / When warm…

"He that lies down with dogs, his limbs to ease, / Sleep as he will, he'll surely rise with fleas; / So he that would keep both clean and well, / Must not with filthy creatures closely dwell."—Barber, 1857

He that Lies Down With the Dogs, Will Rise Up With the Fleas

"He that lies down with dogs, his limbs to ease, / Sleep as he will, he'll surely rise with fleas; /…

"These fishermen chanced a large haul to make, / Were fearful lest the fish their net would break; / Down in the water plunge, make sure their net, / The fish they seize; they care not for the wet."—Barber, 1857

He That Would Catch Fish, Must Not Mind Getting Wet

"These fishermen chanced a large haul to make, / Were fearful lest the fish their net would break; /…

"Experience teaches far more than tongue can tell, / Where the shoe pinches, or where troubles dwell: / When on the shoal the loaded boat is lying, / This man, he knows it well - the oar he's plying; / He can true warning give to others round, / He knows full well the boat is on the ground."—Barber, 1857

He that's Aground Knows Where the Shoal is

"Experience teaches far more than tongue can tell, / Where the shoe pinches, or where troubles dwell:…

"The ship is sunk - he's wrecked at last at sea, / His life to guard in his extremity, / He binds around him his life-preserver, / Which buoys him safely above the water, / So if his float is lost, yet still he'll swim; / Some ship that's sailing by may take him in."—Barber, 1857

Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst

"The ship is sunk - he's wrecked at last at sea, / His life to guard in his extremity, / He binds around…

"A chimney sweep hath some offense here given, / The foolish man is to fierce anger driven; / The urchin black, strikes at his face and eyes, / A dirty fight ensures, fierce passion rise: / Lashes are given - oftener the blows, / At every touch the man still blacker grows: / If you would keep your face and clothes quite neat, / Avoid all quarrels with a chimney sweep."—Barber, 1857

If You Quarrel with a Sweep, You'll Get Blackened

"A chimney sweep hath some offense here given, / The foolish man is to fierce anger driven; / The urchin…

"A traveler's starting for a distant port, / The train is ready, and the time is short; / He gives a boy his trunk upon the way, / Bids him be quick, and not to stop and play, / But soon the boy pursues a butterfly, / Forgets his errand, and the time slips by."

If You Want a Thing Done, Go; If Not, Send

"A traveler's starting for a distant port, / The train is ready, and the time is short; / He gives a…

"See these poor fools into anger falling, / What hateful raging, tearing, mauling; / And all for what? for some small insult given, / The fool into mad revenge is driven: / Better by far, of jeers no notice take, / Than foot the cost that fell revenge will make."—Barber, 1857

It Costs More to Revenge Injuries than to Bear Them

"See these poor fools into anger falling, / What hateful raging, tearing, mauling; / And all for what?…

"The engraving shows a large, powerful man, of giant size and strength, endeavoring to move a large stone, or rock, which obstructs a passage way. His brute force is, however, unavailing, as with all his great strength he cannot move the stone one inch. But see the superiority of head work, or wisdom. A small, weak man approaches: he has not got half the bodily strength of his companion, but he has a larger and more powerful mind, and by it he can do what the other cannot; he can lift a weight which the other cannot move. His wisdom teaches him the power of the lever, and by one arm he can move a house, showing that 'Knowledge is Power.'"—Barber, 1857

Knowledge is Power

"The engraving shows a large, powerful man, of giant size and strength, endeavoring to move a large…

"This field of corn has been neglected long, / The weeds are rank, quite high, and rooted strong; / These lazy men, beneath a broiling sun, / Have scarcely yet their toilsome work begun; / By 'putting off' the time, hard work they make, / Their toil is doubled, and more work they make."—Barber, 1857

Lazy Folks Take the Most Pains

"This field of corn has been neglected long, / The weeds are rank, quite high, and rooted strong; /…

"A man and wife, by liquor strong inspired, / Have come to blows, with hateful anger fired: / A humane passer by, to quell the broil, / Steps in the house - he gets for all his toil / Some several blows - he learns a lesson sore, / In other's quarrels to interfere no more."—Barber, 1857

Let Other People's Quarrels Alone

"A man and wife, by liquor strong inspired, / Have come to blows, with hateful anger fired: / A humane…

"To wake the dog, a cutting lash is given; / Upwards he springs, with furious anger driven, / Runs at the youth, who flees in a great afright, / Quick o'er the ground, with all his main and might; / Closely pursued, he falls amid the stones; / He breaks his leg, his arm; he loudly groans: / By sad experience he's a lesson got, / When dogs are sleeping, then awake them not."—Barber, 1857

Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

"To wake the dog, a cutting lash is given; / Upwards he springs, with furious anger driven, / Runs at…

"A favorite household dog, to shield from harm, / A maiden kind, has knit some stocking warm, / Wishing to keep his dog-ship warm and neat, / She closely draws the stockings on his feet; / Growler feels awkward as he walks about, / He needs them not - he's well enough without."—Barber, 1857

Let Well Enough Alone

"A favorite household dog, to shield from harm, / A maiden kind, has knit some stocking warm, / Wishing…

"The oak that lifts its stately head on high, / The tempest blast, and whirlwind will defy; / But a small ax, within the woodman's hand, / More powerful proves - its force it cannot stand; / By little strokes, quickly, and often made, / The giant monarch oak is lowly laid: / By feeble means, great wonders meet our eyes, / The forest falls, and splendid cities rise."—Barber, 1857

Little Strokes Fell Great Oaks

"The oak that lifts its stately head on high, / The tempest blast, and whirlwind will defy; / But a…

"In Summer heat, when brightly shines the sun, / To make your hay, the proper time is come: / Spread round the new mown grass, and do it right, / Work while the sky is clear, and sun is bright."—Barber, 1857

Make Hay While the Sun Shines

"In Summer heat, when brightly shines the sun, / To make your hay, the proper time is come: / Spread…

"A philosopher, seating himself under an oak tree, and viewing its massiveness, could not understand why so large a tree should produce such small fruit. 'There,' said he, 'is the pumpkin, growing on a slender vine; how much better it would be, if that vine bore acorns, and the great tree the pumpkins; then there would be some harmony and fitness in nature.' As he was meditating on this subject, and examining some ancient theories on the works of creation, an acorn dropped on his head and broke up the train of his reflections. 'How foolish and short-sighted I am, to question the wisdom of Providence,' thought the philosopher, 'if the acorn had been a pumpkin, my head would have been broken.'"—Barber, 1857

Man Thinks Himself Wise, till God Shows Him His Folly

"A philosopher, seating himself under an oak tree, and viewing its massiveness, could not understand…

"The ship is wrecked upon a rocky coast, / And all the sailors but these two are lost; / As one is sinking in the foaming waves, / A plank comes floating by - his life it saves; / The other's, on a float, without an or, / But friendly breezes waft them both on shore."—Barber, 1857

Man's Extremity, is God's Opportunity

"The ship is wrecked upon a rocky coast, / And all the sailors but these two are lost; / As one is sinking…

"While others are on beds of sweet repose, / This care-worn, wealthy man, no quiet knows; / A wandering cat may sorely him affright, / While counting o'er his gold at dead of night / Strange sights, and noises, oftentimes appear; / He dreads the midnight robber - thinks him near, / Riches he has, but quiet rest is rare, / He's harassed much, his soul is pressed with care."—Barber, 1857

Much Coin, Much Care

"While others are on beds of sweet repose, / This care-worn, wealthy man, no quiet knows; / A wandering…

"Here is a store of costly wine and meats, / Of which this rich man daily drinks and eats; / But in return for his luxurious ways, / He's often sick, and lives but half his days: / He's got the gout; swollen his feet appear, / His wines and savory meat have cost him dear. / To pleasure's hour succeed long days of pain, / Bringing reproach, repentance, in their train; / The richest viands on the palate pall, / And sick at soul, he loathing turns from all, / And envies now the poor man's humble lot, / Who, coarsely clad, and in his lowly cot, / His simple meal, a scanty crust, can eat, / And be content, for labor makes it sweet."—Barber, 1857

Much Meat, Much Malady

"Here is a store of costly wine and meats, / Of which this rich man daily drinks and eats; / But in…

"A fine old hen some ducks and chickens hatch'd, / And with a mother's care their safety watch'd; / But soon the ducklings caused her much affright, / They find a stream, and swim off out of sight."—Barber, 1857

Nature Will Out

"A fine old hen some ducks and chickens hatch'd, / And with a mother's care their safety watch'd; /…

"The sailors' chance of life appears but small, / Between the sea and that high rocky wall, / But, full of hope, they look along the shores, / And find some cordage with some broken oars; / Of broken twigs they find a scanty stock, / Of these a ladder's made to climb the rock."—Barber, 1857

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

"The sailors' chance of life appears but small, / Between the sea and that high rocky wall, / But, full…

"A poor man here is asking for relief, / The full-fed, portly man appears quite deaf; / He's humbly pleading - see the poor creature; / The big man before him grows still deafer; / Alas! how passing strange does this appear, / None are so deaf as those that will not hear. / Of those whose vision's dim, where'er they be, / None are so blind as those who will not see."—Barber, 1857

None so Deaf as Those That Won't Hear

"A poor man here is asking for relief, / The full-fed, portly man appears quite deaf; / He's humbly…

"See here a man who doth true courage lack, / He flies apace - a wolf is on his track: / Nearer he comes - the man doth swifter flee; / The verge he gains; he leaps into the sea: / Out of one danger into one more great, / The foolish creature finds his certain fate."—Barber, 1857

Out of the Frying-Pan into the Fire

"See here a man who doth true courage lack, / He flies apace - a wolf is on his track: / Nearer he comes…

"This simpleton quite saving seems to be, / He stops the leaky spigot, as you see; / Invain he labors, 'tis a useless task, / The open bung-hole soon will drain the cask."—Barber, 1857

Penny Wise and Pound Foolish

"This simpleton quite saving seems to be, / He stops the leaky spigot, as you see; / Invain he labors,…

"The child is wandering into danger great, / The mother draws it from a downward fate, / Thus stops its fall; better thus 'tis quite plain, / Than broken limbs to have, and hours of pain. / Would you prevent a man from drinking rum, / Destroy his liquor, and the work is done."—Barber, 1857

Prevention is Better than Cure

"The child is wandering into danger great, / The mother draws it from a downward fate, / Thus stops…

"The numerous systems scattered wide abroad, / Compare them closely by the Word of God; / Hold fast the good, have all things truly tried / By that all comprehensive guide. / What'er is false, reject without delay; / Uphold the right, and cast the rest away."—Barber, 1857

Prove All Things, Hold Fast that Which is Good

"The numerous systems scattered wide abroad, / Compare them closely by the Word of God; / Hold fast…

"A rogue is caught - if him you'd safely find, / Fetter each limb, and then securely bind. / Dealing with slippery man that may do wrong, / Fast bind your bargain, make it sure and strong, / So that the wriggling, twisting he may make / Is vain, the contract strong, he cannot shake."—Barber, 1857

Safe Bind, Safe Find

"A rogue is caught - if him you'd safely find, / Fetter each limb, and then securely bind. / Dealing…

"See o'er this icy pathway pictured here, / Three sturdy travelers on foot appear; / One of them slips - he breaks his bones - / 'So much for hurrying,' thus he inward groans: / The man more wise and careful goes more slow, / Looks where he steps, and doth more surely go."—Barber, 1857

Slow but Sure

"See o'er this icy pathway pictured here, / Three sturdy travelers on foot appear; / One of them slips…

"The dyke keeps out the roaring ocean tide, / A little stream is running through the side, / A little earth the active men into it throw, / And keep the sea from flooding all below."—Barber, 1857

Stop the Beginning of Evil

"The dyke keeps out the roaring ocean tide, / A little stream is running through the side, / A little…

"The sweating blacksmith here is seen to stand / Beside his forge, with hammer in his hand, / And while the fiery sparks are flying far, / With might and main he strikes the red-hot bar." —Barber, 1857

Strike While the Iron is Hot

"The sweating blacksmith here is seen to stand / Beside his forge, with hammer in his hand, / And while…

"Two boys are represented as trying the experiment of touching a nettle. One of the boys has a brave and courageous disposition. He grasps the nettle with a firm and unflinching hand, and such is its nature that it will not sting him at all. The other boy, being rather cowardly, touches the nettle lightly with a tremulous hand, it stings him instantly and he cries out in pain."—Barber, 1857

The Brave Suffer Little, Cowards Much

"Two boys are represented as trying the experiment of touching a nettle. One of the boys has a brave…

"The workmen all their master will obey, / They plane and saw, and dare not stop to play; / Each boy and man the master keeps in view, / His eye does more than both his hands can do."—barber, 1857

The Eye of the Master Does More Work than Both His Hands

"The workmen all their master will obey, / They plane and saw, and dare not stop to play; / Each boy…

"More than to eat, the hog does not aspire; / To get and cram his food, he looks no higher, / Like men who only live to eat and drink, / Of Him who feeds us all they never think: / They heed not, they love not Him who dwells on high. / Like brutes they live, like brutish beasts they die - / The source of life, of hope, and heavenly love, / They care not for, they never look above."—Barber, 1857

The Hog Never Looks Higher than His Head

"More than to eat, the hog does not aspire; / To get and cram his food, he looks no higher, / Like men…

"When dangers close our path, 'tis wise you'll see, to have more than one place to which to flee; to save himself this rat is poorly killed, his only hole is closed: he's caught, he's killed."—Barber, 1857

The Rat That Has But One Hole is Soon Caught

"When dangers close our path, 'tis wise you'll see, to have more than one place to which to flee; to…

"See here three men engaged in mortal strife; / Two fell assassins seek the lone man's life, / But he, with skill, wards off the murderous blow, / Wielding his sword they cannot him o'erthrow: / But ah! at this, his time of utmost need, / His sword is broke - thus 'tis so decreed: / Poor man! he can defend himself no more, / His life is taken, and the conflict's o'er."—Barber, 1857

The Worth of a Thing is Known by the Want of It

"See here three men engaged in mortal strife; / Two fell assassins seek the lone man's life, / But he,…

"In close array, this firm united band / Guarded on every point will boldly stand; / Their foes attack them on each side in vain; / By standing, they at last the victory gain."—Barber, 1857

They Conquer Who Endure

"In close array, this firm united band / Guarded on every point will boldly stand; / Their foes attack…

"We see here a number of cooks busily engaged in making some broth which they wish to have better than common. For once, they unite their skill. One thinks that everything out to be well salted in order to be palatable, another puts in a good deal of pepper, while another prefers to have a variety of savory herbs. Each of these cooks are careful to put in enough of their favorite ingredients, and thus the broth is cooked. When put on the table it is found to be too salt for some of the company, too high seasoned for others, etc. In short, the broth is spoiled for their eating."—Barber, 1857

Too Many Cooks Spoil the Broth

"We see here a number of cooks busily engaged in making some broth which they wish to have better than…

"He's had his fill, when he the banquet leaves; / He's eat too much - his stomach heaves: / His rich and dainty food, how much he loathes, / The monstrous load now from his stomach flowers; / Nature's relieved - she teaches thus quite plain, / To eat too much of good things, brings much pain."—Barber, 1857

Too Much of a Good Thing, is Worse than Nothing

"He's had his fill, when he the banquet leaves; / He's eat too much - his stomach heaves: / His rich…

"With caution due the man is crossing o'er, / And with a pole he tries the ice before, / O'er the deep current he finds the ice is thin; / He shuns the place; he's saved from plunging in."—Barber, 1857

Try the Ice Before You Venture on It

"With caution due the man is crossing o'er, / And with a pole he tries the ice before, / O'er the deep…

"Across the fields two travelers journey slow, / One looks around to find the distant foe; / The other watches near with caution meet, / And finds a serpent hissing at their feet."—Barber, 1857

Two Heads Are Better Than One

"Across the fields two travelers journey slow, / One looks around to find the distant foe; / The other…

"The wind has blown the gate quite open wide; / To shut it, no one will step aside: / 'I have no business with another's gate,' / So thus the selfish man will surely prate: / An open gate, the cattle soon find out, / And trample in with hogs who root about; / A motley drove now wander o'er the ground, / And desolation, is seen around."—Barber, 1857

What is Everybody's Business is Nobody's Business

"The wind has blown the gate quite open wide; / To shut it, no one will step aside: / 'I have no business…

"One of the boys appears in desperate case; / He thrusts his fists into his playmate's face: / His playmate does not mind for blow or taunt, / He will not fight, and so the other can't."

Where One Will Not, Two Cannot Fight

"One of the boys appears in desperate case; / He thrusts his fists into his playmate's face: / His playmate…