"Argent, a bend, vert. The bend is an honourable ordinary, formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base, and contains the fifth part of the field if uncharged; but if charged with other figures, the third part of the field." -Hall, 1862

Ordinary Bend

"Argent, a bend, vert. The bend is an honourable ordinary, formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the…

"Argent, three bendlets, enhanced gules. ENHANCED. A term applied to bearings placed above their usual situation." -Hall, 1862

Bendlets Enhanced

"Argent, three bendlets, enhanced gules. ENHANCED. A term applied to bearings placed above their usual…

Argent, a bend sinister, purpure. The bend sinister is the same breadth as the bend dexter, and is drawn from the sinister to the dexter side of the shield. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Bendlets

Argent, a bend sinister, purpure. The bend sinister is the same breadth as the bend dexter, and is drawn…

"Bendy of six pieces, azure and argent. BENDY. This word serves to denote a field divided diagonally into several bends, varying in metal and colour." -Hall, 1862

Bendy Ordinary

"Bendy of six pieces, azure and argent. BENDY. This word serves to denote a field divided diagonally…

"Formed by lines drawn horizontally, crossed by others drawn diagonally."—Aveling, 1891

Barry Bendy

"Formed by lines drawn horizontally, crossed by others drawn diagonally."—Aveling, 1891

"Produced by lines drawn vertically, by others drawn diagonally, or by a compound of Paly and Bendy."—Aveling, 1891

Paly Bendy

"Produced by lines drawn vertically, by others drawn diagonally, or by a compound of Paly and Bendy."—Aveling,…

"Arms of Benedict XIV (Lambertini)." — Young, 1901

Benedict XIV

"Arms of Benedict XIV (Lambertini)." — Young, 1901

"Gules, three bezants figured. FIGURED. Those bearings which are depicted with a human face, are said to be figured." -Hall, 1862

Bezants Figured

"Gules, three bezants figured. FIGURED. Those bearings which are depicted with a human face, are said…

"Argent, three billets azure, two over one. BILLETS. This charge is, by some authors, supposed to represent tiles or bricks; by others that it represents a letter or billet. The name and form of the charge most accords with the latter opinion." -Hall, 1862

Billets

"Argent, three billets azure, two over one. BILLETS. This charge is, by some authors, supposed to represent…

"Argent, a boar's head proper couped. COUPED. The head or limbs of any animal cut close is called couped." -Hall, 1862

Boar Couped

"Argent, a boar's head proper couped. COUPED. The head or limbs of any animal cut close is called couped."…

"Argent, a boar's head, erased proper, tusked gules. TUSKED. Any animal having tusks of a different tincture from its body is said to he tusked." -Hall, 1862

Boar Tusked

"Argent, a boar's head, erased proper, tusked gules. TUSKED. Any animal having tusks of a different…

"Argent, a boar's head erect, and erased. ERECT. This is said of any animal or parts of animals, naturally horizontal, being placed in a perpendicular direction." -Hall, 1862

Boar's Head Erect

"Argent, a boar's head erect, and erased. ERECT. This is said of any animal or parts of animals, naturally…

"A Bordure Gobonated Argent and Gules. GOBONATED. In heraldry, same as componé." -Whitney, 1911

Bordure Gobonated

"A Bordure Gobonated Argent and Gules. GOBONATED. In heraldry, same as componé." -Whitney, 1911

"Argent, a boujet proper. BOUJET. An ancient water bucket, frequently borne in shields of arms." -Hall, 1862

Boujet

"Argent, a boujet proper. BOUJET. An ancient water bucket, frequently borne in shields of arms." -Hall,…

The heraldic shield of the Earl of Bradford.

Earl of Bradford

The heraldic shield of the Earl of Bradford.

"Brass Armor of Sir John de Creke." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Brass Armor

"Brass Armor of Sir John de Creke." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Brass Armor of Sir John de Foxley." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Brass Armor

"Brass Armor of Sir John de Foxley." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Brass Armor of Sir John Lisle at Thruxton." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Brass Armor

"Brass Armor of Sir John Lisle at Thruxton." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Argent, a broad arrow gules. BROAD ARROW. An ancient weapon of war, thrown by an engine. It is frequently borne as a charge in coats of arms." -Hall, 1862

Broad Arrow

"Argent, a broad arrow gules. BROAD ARROW. An ancient weapon of war, thrown by an engine. It is frequently…

"Argent, a caltrop proper. CALTROP. An iron instrument made to annoy an enemy's cavalry. They were formed of iron, being four spikes conjoined in such a manner that one was always upwards. It is found in many ancient coats of arms." -Hall, 1862

Caltrop

"Argent, a caltrop proper. CALTROP. An iron instrument made to annoy an enemy's cavalry. They were formed…

"CANTON. The French word for corner. It is a small square figure, generally placed at the dexter chief of the shield, as in the annexed example." -Hall, 1862

Canton

"CANTON. The French word for corner. It is a small square figure, generally placed at the dexter chief…

"The canton is a square part of the escutcheon, usually occupying about one-eighth of the field; it is placed over the chief at the dexter side of the shield: it may be charged, and when this is the case, its size may be increased. The canton represents the banner of the ancient Knights Banneret. The canton in the example is marked A." -Hall, 1862

Canton Ordinary

"The canton is a square part of the escutcheon, usually occupying about one-eighth of the field; it…

"Argent, a chaplet proper. CHAPLET. An ancient ornament for the head, granted to gallant knights for acts of courtesy. It is frequently borne as a charge in a shield of arms, and always tinted in its natural colours." -Hall, 1862

Chaplet

"Argent, a chaplet proper. CHAPLET. An ancient ornament for the head, granted to gallant knights for…

"Checky, sable and argent. CHECKY. The field covered with alternate squares of metal and fur." -Hall, 1862

Checky

"Checky, sable and argent. CHECKY. The field covered with alternate squares of metal and fur." -Hall,…

"Chequée is when the field is divided by lines perpendicular and horizontal, crossing each other, the squares formed by these lines being blazoned of two tinctures arranged alternately."—Aveling, 1891

Chequée

"Chequée is when the field is divided by lines perpendicular and horizontal, crossing each other,…

A heraldic and ornamental form, supposed to represent two rafters meeting.

Chevron

A heraldic and ornamental form, supposed to represent two rafters meeting.

"Or, a chevron gules. CHEVRON. This ordinary is supposed to represent the rafters of the gable of a house." -Hall, 1862

Chevron

"Or, a chevron gules. CHEVRON. This ordinary is supposed to represent the rafters of the gable of a…

Argent, two chevronels, gules. The diminutives of the chevron, according to English Heraldry, are the chevronel, which is half the breadth of the chevron. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Chevron

Argent, two chevronels, gules. The diminutives of the chevron, according to English Heraldry, are the…

"Argent, two chevronels gules. CHEVRONEL. The diminutive of the chevron, being one half its size." -Hall, 1862

Chevronels

"Argent, two chevronels gules. CHEVRONEL. The diminutive of the chevron, being one half its size." -Hall,…

Gules, three couple-closes interlaced in base, or ... the couple-close ... is half the chevronel. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Chevronels

Gules, three couple-closes interlaced in base, or ... the couple-close ... is half the chevronel. -Hall,…

"Argent, a chief, azure, indented. The chief is an ordinary terminated by an horizontal line, which, if it is of any other form but straight, its form must be expressed; it is placed in the upper part of the escutcheon, and occupies one third of the field." -Hall, 1862

Chief Indented

"Argent, a chief, azure, indented. The chief is an ordinary terminated by an horizontal line, which,…

"Or, a chief gules, indented. INDENTED. A serrated figure, much smaller than the dancette." -Hall, 1862

Chief Indented

"Or, a chief gules, indented. INDENTED. A serrated figure, much smaller than the dancette." -Hall, 1862

"Argent, on a chief, gules, two mullets, sable. The chief is an ordinary terminated by an horizontal line, which, if it is of any other form but straight, its form must be expressed; it is placed in the upper part of the escutcheon, and occupies one third of the field." -Hall, 1862

Chief Ordinary

"Argent, on a chief, gules, two mullets, sable. The chief is an ordinary terminated by an horizontal…

"The chivalry of the gothic nations began in the woods of Germany. No youth was then permitted to assume arms, at that time the geat privilege of the noble and the free, at his own pleasure. It was made a social rank, to which it was necessary that the aspiring candidates should be elected in the public councils of their rude commonwealth; and the emulated distinction was then solemnly conferred by the prince, or a kinsman, giving them a javelin and a shield. In these customs we see the origin of knighthood." — Goodrich, 1844

Chivalry and knight-errantry

"The chivalry of the gothic nations began in the woods of Germany. No youth was then permitted to assume…

The heraldic coat of arms of Spencer Churchill, Duke of Marlborough.

Arms of Spencer Churchill

The heraldic coat of arms of Spencer Churchill, Duke of Marlborough.

This Assyrian shield circular panel is found in Khorsabad, Iraq.

Assyrian Shield Circular Panel

This Assyrian shield circular panel is found in Khorsabad, Iraq.

A circle shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

Circular Shield

A circle shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

"Azure, three clarions or. CLARION. A horn or trumpet borne in this shape in English and German coat-armour." -Hall, 1862

Clarion

"Azure, three clarions or. CLARION. A horn or trumpet borne in this shape in English and German coat-armour."…

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said to have been first used by Proetus and Acrisius or Argos, and therefore is called clipeus Argolicus, and likened to the sun. But the clipeus is often represented in Roman sculpture of an oblong oval, which makes the distinction between the common buckler and that of Argos." — Smith, 1873

Clipeus

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said…

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said to have been first used by Proetus and Acrisius or Argos, and therefore is called clipeus Argolicus, and likened to the sun. But the clipeus is often represented in Roman sculpture of an oblong oval, which makes the distinction between the common buckler and that of Argos." — Smith, 1873

Clipeus

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said…

A Roman clipeus.

Roman clipeus

A Roman clipeus.

"CLOSE. A bird with its wings closed." -Hall, 1862

Close

"CLOSE. A bird with its wings closed." -Hall, 1862

"Gules, an angel erect with wings expanded or, dress closegirt. CLOSEGIRT. A figure whose dress is fastened round the waist." -Hall, 1862

Closegirt

"Gules, an angel erect with wings expanded or, dress closegirt. CLOSEGIRT. A figure whose dress is fastened…

Gules, two barrulets, argent. The barrulet is half the width of the closet. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Closet

Gules, two barrulets, argent. The barrulet is half the width of the closet. -Hall, 1862

"Or, two closets azure. CLOSET. A diminutive of the bar, being only one half its width." -Hall, 1862

Closets

"Or, two closets azure. CLOSET. A diminutive of the bar, being only one half its width." -Hall, 1862

"The following cut represents a Roman clypeus, from the column of Trajan. The projection in the centre was called the <em>umbo</em>, or boss, and sometimes a spike or other prominent excrescence, was placed upon this." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Roman clypeus

"The following cut represents a Roman clypeus, from the column of Trajan. The projection in the centre…

"COCKATRICE. A chimerical animal, a cock with a dragon's tail and wings." -Hall, 1862

Cockatrice

"COCKATRICE. A chimerical animal, a cock with a dragon's tail and wings." -Hall, 1862

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's dress, entered the Peloponnesian camp, and provoked a quarrel with a soldier, by whom he was killed." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Codrus slain

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's…

The Seal of Colorado, 1876. The seal shows The Eye of Providence and Colorado's motto 'Nil sine numine' meaning "Nothing without God's will.

Seal of Colorado

The Seal of Colorado, 1876. The seal shows The Eye of Providence and Colorado's motto 'Nil sine numine'…

"A field of any charge divided into a row of small squares."&mdash;Aveling, 1891

Componée

"A field of any charge divided into a row of small squares."—Aveling, 1891

"Argent, an inescutcheon azure, border compony, or and gules. COMPONY. A term applied to a bordure, pale, bend, or any other ordinary, made up of squares of alternate metal and colour." -Hall, 1862

Compony

"Argent, an inescutcheon azure, border compony, or and gules. COMPONY. A term applied to a bordure,…

"Two or more annulets interlacing each other."&mdash;Aveling, 1891

Annulet Conjoined

"Two or more annulets interlacing each other."—Aveling, 1891

"Degraded means placed upon degrees, or steps."&mdash;Aveling, 1891

Cross Nowed, Degraded and Conjoined

"Degraded means placed upon degrees, or steps."—Aveling, 1891

"Gules, a bend argent, coticed of the same. COTICE. One of the diminutives of the bend: cotices are generally borne on each side of the bend. The cotices are frequently of a different tincture from the bend they cotice." -Hall, 1862

Cotice

"Gules, a bend argent, coticed of the same. COTICE. One of the diminutives of the bend: cotices are…

Argent, a riband vert. The riband, which is one third less than the garter and the bendlet, must never occupy more than one sixth of the field. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Cotice

Argent, a riband vert. The riband, which is one third less than the garter and the bendlet, must never…

"Counter-compon&eacute;e has two rows of squares, with a metal and color alternating."&mdash;Aveling, 1891

Counter-Componée

"Counter-componée has two rows of squares, with a metal and color alternating."—Aveling,…

Or, a cross, gules. THE CROSS ... as its name imports, was the distinguishing badge of the Crusaders, in its simplest form. It was merely two pieces of list or riband of the same length, crossing each other at right angles. The colour of the riband or list denoted the nation to which the Crusader belonged. The cross is an honourable ordinary, occupying one fifth of the shield when not charged, but if charged, one third. -Hall, 1862

Couple-Close

Or, a cross, gules. THE CROSS ... as its name imports, was the distinguishing badge of the Crusaders,…

"Argent, three couple-closes interlaced vert. COUPLE-CLOSE. One of the diminutives of the chevron, half the size of the chevronel." -Hall, 1862

Couple-Close

"Argent, three couple-closes interlaced vert. COUPLE-CLOSE. One of the diminutives of the chevron, half…

"Azure, a crescent argent. CRESCENT. The half moon with its horns turned upwards." -Hall, 1862

Crescent

"Azure, a crescent argent. CRESCENT. The half moon with its horns turned upwards." -Hall, 1862

"A half-moon shaped charge, with its horns turned upwards."&mdash;Aveling, 1891

Crescent

"A half-moon shaped charge, with its horns turned upwards."—Aveling, 1891