A large church in Westminster, London, England, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminister. Traditionally, English and British monarchs are coronated and buried here.

Westminster Abbey

A large church in Westminster, London, England, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminister.…

Queen Anne of Great Britain's reign was from 1702 to 1714.

Queen Anne of England

Queen Anne of Great Britain's reign was from 1702 to 1714.

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916.

Herbert H. Asquith

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916.

"In the church of St. Mary, at Bury St. Edmunds, the ceiling of the eastern compartment of the south aisle, once the chantry of John Baret, is richly painted and diapered with beautifully drawn collars of SS, each collar enclosing the monogram of this zealous Lancastrian, I.B."—Aveling, 1891

Monogram of John Baret

"In the church of St. Mary, at Bury St. Edmunds, the ceiling of the eastern compartment of the south…

Also known as Benjamin Disraeli. He was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1874 to 1880.

Lord Beaconsfield

Also known as Benjamin Disraeli. He was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1874 to 1880.

"It was part of the duties of a bellman, or night-watchman, to call out the hours, the state of the weather, and other information as he passed by."—Webster, 1920

A London Bellman

"It was part of the duties of a bellman, or night-watchman, to call out the hours, the state of the…

A British Methodist preacher who founded the Salvation Army.

William Booth

A British Methodist preacher who founded the Salvation Army.

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League. He also sat in the House of Commons from 1843 to 1889.

John Bright

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League. He also sat in the House of Commons from…

A rare breed of cattle that live in a large enclosed part at Chillingham Castle in England.

Chillingham Bull

A rare breed of cattle that live in a large enclosed part at Chillingham Castle in England.

Prime Minister of Great Britain for a brief amount of time in 1827.

George Canning

Prime Minister of Great Britain for a brief amount of time in 1827.

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Cannon

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Caerphilly Castle is a Norman castle that dominates the centre of the town of Caerphilly in south Wales. Caerphilly Castle was built to stop Llywelyn's southward ambitions. It is the largest castle in Wales, the second largest in Britain (second to Windsor Castle) and is one of the largest fortresses in Europe. Built mainly between 1268 and 1271, it is an early example of a concentric castle.

Caerphilly Castle

Caerphilly Castle is a Norman castle that dominates the centre of the town of Caerphilly in south Wales.…

A form of transportation used during 17th century England.

Coach and Sedan Chair

A form of transportation used during 17th century England.

The silver crown coin of Charles II, who was the King of England between 1649 and 1651.

Silver Crown of Charles II

The silver crown coin of Charles II, who was the King of England between 1649 and 1651.

The 1st Earl of Chatham who led Britain during the Seven Years' War. He was the Prime Minister between 1766 and 1768.

William Pitt, Earl of Chatham

The 1st Earl of Chatham who led Britain during the Seven Years' War. He was the Prime Minister between…

Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland located at the north side of the mouth of the River Wear. It was one of the three original settlements on the banks of the River Wear along with Bishopwearmouth and Sunderland, the area now known as the East End. It includes the area around St. Peter's Church and was once the main centre of Wearside shipbuilding and coalmining in the town. It is now host to a campus of the University of Sunderland and the National Glass Centre. It is served by the three Church of England churches of the Parish of Monkwearmouth. The locals of the area were called "Barbary Coasters". The borough stretches from Wearmouth Bridge to the harbour mouth on the north side of the river and is one of the oldest parts of Sunderland.

Monkwearmouth Church

Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland located at the north side of the mouth of the River Wear. It…

Queen Elizabeth stepping over some mud with Sir Walter Raleigh's cloak.

Sir Walter Raleigh's Cloak

Queen Elizabeth stepping over some mud with Sir Walter Raleigh's cloak.

This table cloth is was made for the Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom. It has scenery of deer stalking, a sport that prince Albert enjoyed at the time.

Table Cloth

This table cloth is was made for the Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom. It has scenery of deer stalking,…

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League.

Robert Cobden

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League.

"The narrow room in which the House of Commons holds its sessions contains seats for less than 350 of the 707 members. The discomfort in crowding is compensated for by the ease of hearing. The representative sit on benches facing one another across the aisle. The Speaker of the House occupies a chair at the end of the room. On his right are the members of the Ministry; on his left, the Opposition. The Speaker's symbol, the mace, is carried before him when he formally leaves and enters the House, and remains on the table while he occupies the chair."—Webster, 1920

Interior of the House of Commons

"The narrow room in which the House of Commons holds its sessions contains seats for less than 350 of…

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

Court of Common Pleas

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

Thomas Cranmer (2 July 1489 – 21 March 1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI. He helped build a favourable case for Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon which resulted in the separation of the English Church from union with the Holy See. Along with Thomas Cromwell, he supported the principle of royal supremacy in which the king was considered sovereign over the Church within his realm.

Thomas Cranmer

Thomas Cranmer (2 July 1489 – 21 March 1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop…

"Richard I (looking down on the Holy City): 'My dream comes true.' A cartoon which appeared in Punch, Dec. 19, 1917, at the time of the British capture of Jerusalem."—Webster, 1920

The Last Crusade

"Richard I (looking down on the Holy City): 'My dream comes true.' A cartoon which appeared in Punch,…

An illustration of a "silver Medal-cup (The medals are all of the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel.)" -Century, 1886

Medal Cup

An illustration of a "silver Medal-cup (The medals are all of the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel.)"…

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881), was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government for three decades, twice as Prime Minister. An Anglican, he was nonetheless the first and thus far only Prime Minister of Jewish heritage. Disraeli's greatest lasting achievement was the creation of the modern Conservative Party after the Corn Laws schism of 1846.

Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881), was a British Conservative…

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the Conqueror.

Domesday Book

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the…

A title of Peerage of the United Kingdom, created for the prominent Whig politician John Lambton. He authored the famous Durham Report, which is an important document in the history of Canada.

Earl of Durham

A title of Peerage of the United Kingdom, created for the prominent Whig politician John Lambton. He…

A sceptre from the seal of Edward the Confessor.

Sceptre of Edward the Confessor

A sceptre from the seal of Edward the Confessor.

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

Edward VII

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

The King of the United Kingdom from 1901 until his death in 1910.

Edward VII

The King of the United Kingdom from 1901 until his death in 1910.

The seal used to symbolize the monarch's approval of important state documents.

Great Seal of England Under the Commonwealth

The seal used to symbolize the monarch's approval of important state documents.

The central bank of the whole of the United Kingdom.

The Bank of England

The central bank of the whole of the United Kingdom.

The obverse and reverse sides of the fourpenny piece, or groat, an English silver coin worth fourpence.

Fourpenny Piece of Queen Victoria

The obverse and reverse sides of the fourpenny piece, or groat, an English silver coin worth fourpence.

Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. 1284 – 19 June 1312) was the favorite, and possibly lover, of King Edward II of England. A Gascon by birth, Piers was the son of Sir Arnaud de Gabaston, a soldier in service to King Edward I of England. Arnaud had been used as a hostage by Edward twice; on the second occasion, Arnaud escaped captivity, and fled to England with his son. Both then entered the royal household, where Gaveston behaved so well and so virtuously that the King declared him an example for his own son, Prince Edward.

Piers Gaveston

Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. 1284 – 19 June 1312) was the favorite, and possibly lover,…

George IV or George Augustus Frederick (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. He had earlier served as The Prince Regent when his father, George III, suffered from a relapse into insanity from an illness that is now suspected to have been porphyria. The Regency, George's nine-year tenure as Prince Regent, which commenced in 1811 and ended with George III's death in 1820, was marked by victory in the Napoleonic Wars in Europe.

George IV

George IV or George Augustus Frederick (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United…

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1916 to 1922 and Leader of the Liberal Party from 1926 to 1931.

David Lloyd George

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1916 to 1922 and Leader of the Liberal Party from 1926…

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy ground. The rock, which is about 2 1/2 miles in length, rises to a height of 1400 feet. At the base and on the summit are powerful batteries, while the sides are pierces with loopholes and galleries for cannon. There is also an inclosed harbor in which a fleet can safely anchor. Gibraltar has remained in British hands since 1704."—Webster, 1920.

Gibraltar

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy…

A British soldier and senior commander during World War I.

Sir Douglas Haig

A British soldier and senior commander during World War I.

Harlech Castle, located in Harlech, Gwynedd, Wales, is a concentric castle, constructed atop a cliff close to the Irish Sea. Architecturally, it is particularly notable for its massive gatehouse. Built by King Edward I during his conquest of Wales, the castle was subject to several assaults and sieges during its period of active use as a fortification. The seven-year siege of the castle, during the War of the Roses, has been memorialised in the famous song, "Men of Harlech".

Harlech Castle

Harlech Castle, located in Harlech, Gwynedd, Wales, is a concentric castle, constructed atop a cliff…

Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066.

Battle of Hastings

Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066.

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory. St. Helena has been used as a place of exile for people like Napoleon I and Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.

The Island of St. Helena

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory.…

The heraldic shield and crown of Henry III of England.

Crown and Shield of Henry III

The heraldic shield and crown of Henry III of England.

A hotel in London, England.

Hotel

A hotel in London, England.

A hotel located in Bristol, United Kingdom.

Clifton Down Hotel

A hotel located in Bristol, United Kingdom.

The Fortfield Hotel in Sidmouth.

Fortfield Hotel

The Fortfield Hotel in Sidmouth.

The Valley of Rocks Hotel in Lynton.

Valley of Rocks Hotel

The Valley of Rocks Hotel in Lynton.

"This Order was instituted by Her Majesty the Queen, in the year 1861, for bestowing honor upon the people of her Indian Empire. The Order consists of the Sovereign, a Grand Master, always to be Governor-General of India, and twenty-five Knights, with such Honorary Knights as the Crown may appoint. The Knights are to include both Naval, Military, and Civil officers, and natives of India."—Aveling, 1891

Insignia of the Order of the Star of India

"This Order was instituted by Her Majesty the Queen, in the year 1861, for bestowing honor upon the…

The Tabard, an inn that stood on the east side of Borough High Street in Southwark, was established in 1307, when the abbot of Hyde purchased the land to construct a hostel for himself and his brethren, when business took them to London, as well as an inn to accommodate the numerous pilgrims headed on annual pilgrimage to the Shrine of Thomas Beckett in Canterbury Cathedral. The Tabard is famous as the place owned by Harry Bailey, the host in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and is described in the first few lines of Chaucer's work as the location where the pilgrims first meet on their journey to Canterbury in the 1380s.

Tabard Inn

The Tabard, an inn that stood on the east side of Borough High Street in Southwark, was established…

A gold coin of King James I. It was the first coin to bear the name 'Great Britain.'

Gold Coin of James I

A gold coin of King James I. It was the first coin to bear the name 'Great Britain.'

An illustration of King Charles wearing a rather large neck tie.

King Charles

An illustration of King Charles wearing a rather large neck tie.

"Manor house in Suffolk, England."—Gordy, 1912

Manor House

"Manor house in Suffolk, England."—Gordy, 1912

Also refers to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough.

Marlborough

Also refers to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough.

An English poet and author of the epic of Paradise Lost.

John Milton

An English poet and author of the epic of Paradise Lost.

Portrait of General Monk who was at the head of the army in England

General Monk

Portrait of General Monk who was at the head of the army in England

"A granite Corinthian column, 145 feet high, surmounted by a statue of Nelson, 16 feet high. On the pedestal are bronze sculptures, cast with the metal of captured French cannon and representing scenes from Nelson's naval victories. Four colossal lions, modeled by Sir Edwin Landseer, crouch at the base of the monument."—Webster, 1920

The Nelson Monument

"A granite Corinthian column, 145 feet high, surmounted by a statue of Nelson, 16 feet high. On the…

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535) was an English lawyer, author, and statesman who in his lifetime gained a reputation as a leading humanist scholar, and occupied many public offices, including Lord Chancellor (1529–1532), in which he had a number of people burned at the stake for heresy. More coined the word "utopia", a name he gave to an ideal, imaginary island nation whose political system he described in the eponymous book published in 1516. He was beheaded in 1535 when he refused to sign the Act of Supremacy that declared Henry VIII Supreme Head of the Church in England.

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535) was an English lawyer, author, and statesman who…

Beau Nash (18 October 1674 - 3 February 1762), born Richard Nash, was a celebrated dandy and leader of fashion in 18th-century Britain. He is best remembered as the Master of Ceremonies at the spa town of Bath.

Beau Nash

Beau Nash (18 October 1674 - 3 February 1762), born Richard Nash, was a celebrated dandy and leader…

(--) Head of English state

Frederic, Lord North, Earl of Guilford

(--) Head of English state

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1834 to 1835, and again from 1841 to 1846.

Sir Robert Peel

The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1834 to 1835, and again from 1841 to 1846.

The youngest prime minister of Great Britain, serving from 1783 to 1801, and again from 1804 to 1806.

William Pitt the Younger

The youngest prime minister of Great Britain, serving from 1783 to 1801, and again from 1804 to 1806.