Buttercup Gold and Other Stories

by Ellen Robena Field

“How the Raindrops and Sunbeams Helped”

Additional Information
  • Year Published: 1894
  • Language: English
  • Country of Origin: United States of America
  • Source: Field, E.R. (1894) Buttercup Gold and Other Stories Bangor: C. H. Glass
  • Readability:
    • Flesch–Kincaid Level: 7.0
  • Word Count: 516
  • Genre: Fairy Tale/Folk Tale
  • Keywords: 19th century literature, children's literature, short stories
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One morning Mother Nature looked about her, and said: “My children have had such a nice long rest and it will do them good, for they have a busy summer before them. It is time to go to work now, and as some of the babies just won’t wake up till they have to, I must send for my helpers at once.” The long days carried her messages, which in our language would have read something like this:—

My Dear Helpers, Sunbeams, and Raindrops:—

You are needed down here on earth. It is time to dress my plant children, and give them work to do. The birds must be called back from the South, and the cocoons must be opened so that my butterflies can come out. I shall have to make good soil and get my clover beds ready for the honey makers. Come at once, as some have been sleeping too long already. Whisper to the trees as you pass that it is time they were budding, Be gentle with all, for they are my children, and I love them.

    Good-bye, from your
    Mother Nature

This she directed to the Sunbeams at Blue Sky Park, and the Raindrops at Cloud Land. When the message reached these little helpers, they started off at once to obey the call, and the sun gave such a merry laugh, that Grandma came to the door of the farm house and remarked: “How warm it is today, quite like spring; I believe I will set out my geraniums.” But just then a silvery voice said: “Wait a little while longer till we make the ground soft,” and pop came a raindrop upon the dear old lady’s nose, and she hurried into the house, saying “What queer weather we are having! first sun and then rain.” Then the Raindrops and Sunbeams smiled at each other, and danced more merrily, for they knew what good work they were doing to the great brown house where the flowers dwell.

The tap, tap, of the Raindrops wake them up, and when they raised their sleepy heads and felt the warm kisses of the Sunbeams, they were glad and began to grow. Soft breezes called to the leaves to come out, and soon the brown coats which the trees had worn all winter were replaced by new green dresses. Pussywillow and snowdrop were the first to herald the spring, and crocus and violet soon followed. Out in the woods blossomed tiny pink and white May flowers. Little seeds burst off their jackets and sent up green plumes. Then Mother Nature called her helpers again and told them to search for the lilies, and dress them in white robes for Easter. And so each beautiful flower came again—and the birds sang once more, and the children were glad that spring had come again. The little helpers had done their work well, and were happy—and every one thanked God for the spring.