This military ClipArt gallery offers 67 images of fortifications made for military purposes. Fortifications are defined as any structure or device meant to bolster one's own defense while impeding the progress of an opponent, and can be anything from a castle or tower to a wire fence or chevaux de frise.

"Abatis consisting of trees lying parallel to each other with the branches pointing in the general direction of approach and interlaced. All leaves and small twigs should be removed and the stiff ends of branches pointed." — Moss, 1914

Abatis

"Abatis consisting of trees lying parallel to each other with the branches pointing in the general direction…

"One of the names given to those narrow apertures so often seen in the walls of old castles, and through which the cross-bowmen discharged their arrows." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Balistraria

"One of the names given to those narrow apertures so often seen in the walls of old castles, and through…

"A projecting watchtower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The term Barbican was more specially applied to the outwork intended to defend the drawbridge, which in moden fortifications is called the tete du pont." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Barbican

"A projecting watchtower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The…

A projecting watch tower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The term barbican was more especially applied to the outwork intended to defend the drawbridge, which in modern fortifications is called the <em>tete du pont</em>.

Barbican

A projecting watch tower, or other advanced work, before the gate of a castle or fortified town. The…

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards applied to churches and other buildings for ornaments.

Battlement

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards…

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards applied to churches and other buildings for ornaments.

Battlement

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards…

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards applied to churches and other buildings for ornaments.

Battlement

Battlements are indentations on the top of a parapet or wall, first used in fortifications, and afterwards…

"An indented parapet, formed by a series of rising parts called cops or merlons, separated by openings called crenelles or embrasures. Originally military, they are now used in buildings for ornament." — Williams, 1889

Battlement

"An indented parapet, formed by a series of rising parts called cops or merlons, separated by openings…

A block house from Colonial America

Block House

A block house from Colonial America

Fortification constructed of timber, muskets and cann0n fire from within.

Blockhouse

Fortification constructed of timber, muskets and cann0n fire from within.

A blockhouse for soldiers.

Blockhouse

A blockhouse for soldiers.

Blockhouses, built of heavy logs with the second story overhanging the first, were created for defense against enemies.

Blockhouse

Blockhouses, built of heavy logs with the second story overhanging the first, were created for defense…

A bomb and splinter proof in Fort Wagner.

Bomb and Splinter Proof, Fort Wagner

A bomb and splinter proof in Fort Wagner.

An illustration of makeshift military camp.

Military Camp

An illustration of makeshift military camp.

"Traditore batteries, by hypothesis, fire only to the flank and rear. They are thus always placed, behind a corner; that protection is continued laterally for such a distance that a projectile from any likely direction will either meet the covering mass or pass clear of the gun muzzles." &mdash;Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1922

Traditore Battery Bourges Casemate

"Traditore batteries, by hypothesis, fire only to the flank and rear. They are thus always placed, behind…

"Details of a castle: 1. Fortified approach 2. Drawbridge 3. Moat 4. Donjon or keep 5. Towers flanking main entrance 6. Angle towers for defense of outer wall 7. Chapel." -Foster, 1921

Castle Parts

"Details of a castle: 1. Fortified approach 2. Drawbridge 3. Moat 4. Donjon or keep 5. Towers flanking…

"Heavy obstacles employed in Manchuria by the Russians." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Cavalry barrier

"Heavy obstacles employed in Manchuria by the Russians." — Moss, 1914

"A formidable obstacle against cavalry consists of railroad ties planted at intervals of 10 feet with tops four and a half feet above the ground, and connected by a line of rails spiked securely to each." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Cavalry obstacle

"A formidable obstacle against cavalry consists of railroad ties planted at intervals of 10 feet with…

"They are usually made in sections of manageable length chained together at the ends." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Cheveaux de frise

"They are usually made in sections of manageable length chained together at the ends." — Moss,…

An illustration of the fortification around Constantinople and soldiers firing cannons.

Constantinople

An illustration of the fortification around Constantinople and soldiers firing cannons.

"The Austrian counterscarp casement is constructionally simple. Under the counterscarp wall, on the further side of the ditch, facing the salient angle of the of the work, a chamber is formed with embrasures for rifle, machine gun or light artillery fire along the two adjacent ditch lengths." &mdash; Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1922

Austrian Fort Counterscarp Casement

"The Austrian counterscarp casement is constructionally simple. Under the counterscarp wall, on the…

A diagram illustrating the dimension and construction of the counterscarp at Fort Metz. The surrounding wall is is approximately 3 meters thick, and contains an opening for a gun and communication tunnel.

Metz Fort Counterscarp

A diagram illustrating the dimension and construction of the counterscarp at Fort Metz. The surrounding…

"Crown-work, in Fortification, is formed to strengthen a weak front, or to occupy ground which might facilitate the enemy's operations. It consists of two faces inclined to each other at an angle, with a bastion in the middle, and half-bastions at the two ends; and it is connected with the main body of the work by two long sides. RMNPS is the crown-work, in front of and protecting the ravelin O. Both of these works are entirely beyong the main ditch of the place, but each has also a ditch of its own." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crown-Work

"Crown-work, in Fortification, is formed to strengthen a weak front, or to occupy ground which might…

"Curtain, in Fortification, is the portion of rampart or wall between two bastions or two gates. In a regular siege, to batter down the curtain is one of the main operations depended on; and many of the external works constructed by the defenders are intended to frustrate, or at least embarrass, this operation. In the annexed cut, which shows a ground-plan of some of the elements of a regular fortification, FF' is the curtain; HAEF, a bastion. The component parts of the bastion are thus designated: AH and AE, two faces; EF and GH, two flanks; A, the salient; FG, the gorge; and H and E, the shoulders. mn is the rampart; mo, the parapet on the rampart; QPQ', the ditch; NO, the covery-way; RWR', the glacis; KLL', a ravelin." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Curtain

"Curtain, in Fortification, is the portion of rampart or wall between two bastions or two gates. In…

"That kind of masonry, much used in ancient fortification-walls, etc. in which the outside surfaces on both sides are formed of ashler laid in regular courses, and the inclosed space between them is filled in with rubble-work." -Whitney, 1911

Emplectum

"That kind of masonry, much used in ancient fortification-walls, etc. in which the outside surfaces…

"A bundle of rods or small sticks of wood bound at both ends and in the middle, used in fortification, raising batteries, filling ditches, strengthening ramparts, and making parapets." -Whitney, 1911

Fascine

"A bundle of rods or small sticks of wood bound at both ends and in the middle, used in fortification,…

Fort Duquesne (originally called Fort Du Quesne) was a fort established by the French in 1754, at the junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in what is now downtown Pittsburgh in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It was destroyed and replaced by Fort Pitt in 1758; over two centuries later, the site formerly occupied by Fort Duquesne is now Point State Park.

Fort Duquesne

Fort Duquesne (originally called Fort Du Quesne) was a fort established by the French in 1754, at the…

Fort Garry, also known as Upper Fort Garry, was a Hudson's Bay Company trading post at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers in what is now downtown Winnipeg. It was established in 1822 on or near the site of the North West Company's Fort Gibraltar. Fort Garry was named after Nicholas Garry, deputy governor of the Hudson's Bay Company. It served as the centre of fur trade within the Red River Settlement. Unfortunately in 1826, a severe flood destroyed the fort. It was rebuilt in 1835 by the HBC and named Upper Fort Garry to differentiate it from "the Lower Fort," or Lower Fort Garry, 32 km downriver, which was established in 1831. Throughout the mid to late 1800s, Upper Fort Garry played a minor role in the actual trading of furs, but was central to the administration of the HBC and the surrounding settlement. The Council of Assiniboia, the administrative and judicial body of the Red River Settlement mainly run by HBC officials, met at Upper Fort Garry.

Interior of Fort Garry

Fort Garry, also known as Upper Fort Garry, was a Hudson's Bay Company trading post at the confluence…

An illustration of Fort Jefferson which is located today in what is Dry Tortugas National Park. Dry Tortugas National Park preserves Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas section of the Florida Keys. The park covers 101 mi² (262 km²), mostly water, about 68 statute miles (109 km) west of Key West in the Gulf of Mexico.

Fort Jefferson

An illustration of Fort Jefferson which is located today in what is Dry Tortugas National Park. Dry…

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Fort Pitt

The blockhouse and soldiers at Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site, better known simply as Fort Taylor, (or Fort Zach to locals), is a Florida State Park and National Historic Landmark centered on a Civil War-era fort located near the southern tip of Key West, Florida. Construction of the fort began in 1845 as part of a mid-1800s plan to defend the southeast coast through a series of forts. The fort was named for United States President Zachary Taylor in 1850, a few months after President Taylor's sudden death in office. Yellow fever epidemics and material shortages slowed construction of the fort, which continued throughout the 1850s.

Fort Taylor

The Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site, better known simply as Fort Taylor, (or Fort Zach to locals),…

Fort Wayne was established 1839 in Indian Territory by Lt. Col. R.B. Mason of the 1st Dragoons. Named for Gen. "Mad" Anthony Wayne, it was intended as a link in the great line of forts protecting the American West. The army abandoned the fort in 1842 and turned it over to the Cherokee Nation. At the beginning of the Civil War, Stand Watie took over the fort and organized the Cherokee Mounted Rifles. The Union met the Confederates here in 1862 for the Battle of Old Fort Wayne.

Fort Wayne

Fort Wayne was established 1839 in Indian Territory by Lt. Col. R.B. Mason of the 1st Dragoons. Named…

An illustration of a counterscarp casement in Metz Feste Fort. The casement is designed with concrete walls with 3 meter thick. The casement lets the soldier fire in one direction.

Counterscarp Casement Underground Tunnel Metz Feste Fort

An illustration of a counterscarp casement in Metz Feste Fort. The casement is designed with concrete…

A plan showing the flanking organ at Fort Metz. The room is located at or near ground level with rifle and pistol opening at the top of the domed room.

Metz Fort Flanking Organ

A plan showing the flanking organ at Fort Metz. The room is located at or near ground level with rifle…

The plan of the French fort, Metz Feste. The fort was created in 1871 by the German Empire. The fort have underground tunnels to connect the structures.

Metz Feste Fort Plan

The plan of the French fort, Metz Feste. The fort was created in 1871 by the German Empire. The fort…

An underground section of the infantry work at Mettz Feste Fort. The underground tunnels leads to the main barracks, command posts, and to the observation post. On the left, the barbed wire is placed on the surface in front of the ditch.

Underground Tunnel Metz Feste Fort

An underground section of the infantry work at Mettz Feste Fort. The underground tunnels leads to the…

"On the height 130 is an armoured battery P B, containing four 6 in. howitzers in cupolas, with an observation post in a small cupola in the centre. A passage runs along the backs of the cupolas and ammunition rooms, and two barrack rooms are provided at the ends, with other small rooms as offices in the centre." &mdash; Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1922

Austrian Design Group Fortification

"On the height 130 is an armoured battery P B, containing four 6 in. howitzers in cupolas, with an observation…

"Section of Fortified Wall. (Interior on the left; exterior on the right.) a, a, is the abatis; b, b, the counterscarp; c, c, the palisade; d, d, the scarp; f, f, the fraise; f, e, g, g, the parapet; h, the banquette; and i, g, the breast-height." -Whitney, 1911

Section of Fortified Wall

"Section of Fortified Wall. (Interior on the left; exterior on the right.) a, a, is the abatis; b, b,…

"A fraise is a palisade horizontal, or nearly so, projecting from the scarp or counterscarp. A modern and better form consists of supports at 3 or 4 feet interval, connected by barbed wire, forming a horizontal wire fence." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Fraise

"A fraise is a palisade horizontal, or nearly so, projecting from the scarp or counterscarp. A modern…

Piece of timber travsversed with spikes of iron, or of wood pointed with iron, 5 or 6 feet long, used to defend a passage.

Chevaux de Frise

Piece of timber travsversed with spikes of iron, or of wood pointed with iron, 5 or 6 feet long, used…

"And when they came to the gate of the city, they found Ozias, and the ancients of the city waiting. And when they saw her they were astonished, and admired her beauty exceedingly. But they asked her no question, only they let her pass, saying: The God of our fathers give thee grace, and may he strengthen all the counsel of thy heart with his power, that Jerusalem may glory in thee, and thy name may be in the number of the holy and just. And they that were there said, all with one voice: So be it, so be it. But Judith praying to the Lord, passed through the gates, she and her maid." Judith 10:6-10 DRA
<p>Judith adorns herself and passes through the city gates on her way to meet Holofernes, whom she beheads.

Judith Passes Through the City Gates

"And when they came to the gate of the city, they found Ozias, and the ancients of the city waiting.…

A man standing in an armored lookout.

An Armored Lookout

A man standing in an armored lookout.

A machicolation is a floor opening between the supporting corbels of a battlement, through which stones could be dropped on attackers at the base of a defensive wall. The design was developed in the Middle Ages when the Norman crusaders returned. A machicolated battlement projects outwards from the supporting wall in order to facilitate this.

Machicolation

A machicolation is a floor opening between the supporting corbels of a battlement, through which stones…

The old magazine at Williamsburg

The Old Magazine at Williamsburg

The old magazine at Williamsburg

"In determining the area of overhead cover to be provided, allow 6 sq. ft. per man for occupancy while on duty only, or 12 square ft. per man for continuous occupancy not of long duration. For long occupation 18 to 20 sq. ft. per man should be provided." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Overhead cover

"In determining the area of overhead cover to be provided, allow 6 sq. ft. per man for occupancy while…

"Palisades should be planted to incline slightly to the front. As little earth should be disturbed in digging as possible, and one side of the trench should be kept in the desired plane fo the palisade." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Palisade

"Palisades should be planted to incline slightly to the front. As little earth should be disturbed in…

A stone wall or embarkment used to help protect soldiers and cannons.

Parapet

A stone wall or embarkment used to help protect soldiers and cannons.

A strong grating of timber or iron, somewhat resembling a harrow, made to slide in vertical grooves in the jambs of an enterance gate of a fortified place.

Portcullis

A strong grating of timber or iron, somewhat resembling a harrow, made to slide in vertical grooves…

A detached triangular work in fortification, with two embankments which form a projecting angle. In the figure B B is the ravelin with A its redout, and CC its ditch, DD being the main ditch of the fortress,and E the passage giving access from the fortress to the ravelin.

Ravelin

A detached triangular work in fortification, with two embankments which form a projecting angle. In…

In field fortification, the simplest kind of work employed, consisting of two parapets of earth raised so as to form a salient angle, with the apex towards the enemy and unprotected on the rear. Several redans connected by curtains form lines of intrenchment.

Redans

In field fortification, the simplest kind of work employed, consisting of two parapets of earth raised…

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra. F, porta principalis sinistra. G, praetorium. H, forum. K,K, tribuni. L, auxilia. M, ara. N, tribunal. O, equites. P, pedites. Q, fossa. R, via quintana. S, agger. T, intervallum. V, vallum."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Castra Romana

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra.…

A pile of sandbags.

Sandbags

A pile of sandbags.

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place when within range of fire. This is a section of covered sap.

Covered Sap

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place…

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place when within range of fire. This is a double sap on the serpentine plan.

Double Sap

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place…

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place when within range of fire. This is sap on a rectangular plan.

Rectangular Sap

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place…

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place when within range of fire. This is a section of single sap, showing portion of gabions.

Single Sap

In military affairs, a narrow ditch or trench by which approach is made to a fortress or designed place…

"An abatis formed by felling trees toward the enemy, leaving the butt hanging to the stump, the branches sharpened, is called a slashing." &mdash; Moss, 1914

Slashing

"An abatis formed by felling trees toward the enemy, leaving the butt hanging to the stump, the branches…

A line of posts or stakes set in the earth as a fence or barrier.

Stockade

A line of posts or stakes set in the earth as a fence or barrier.

A military tower.

Tower

A military tower.

"They who are within this machine obtain first a view of the place from their high position, and then, by means of small bridges (<em>pontes</em>), descend upon the city walls." — Anthon, 1891

Mobile tower

"They who are within this machine obtain first a view of the place from their high position, and then,…