Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

Union Prisoners Confined at the Confederate Prison at Andersonville

Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

A bear by camp

Bear

A bear by camp

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana Zouaves in their bivouac at Cumberland, Maryland. Great interest was attached to this regiment after its brilliant attack at Romney; and as we have presented them in the midst of the action, we have pleasure in showing them to our readers roughing it in their distant camps. The members of this regiment were magnificent specimens of the physical man, and under the Colonel Wallace and his officers, who marched on foot, leading their men, accomplished feats of endurance and daring that had been considered impossible in warfare.

Bivouac of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana…

"Soldiers Building Cam, with Guards." — Greenough, 1899

Building Camp

"Soldiers Building Cam, with Guards." — Greenough, 1899

Ground on which tents, huts, etc., are erected for shelter.

Camp

Ground on which tents, huts, etc., are erected for shelter.

"Four such trenches radiating from a common central chimney will give one flue for use whatever may be the direction of the wind." — Moss, 1914

Camp chimney

"Four such trenches radiating from a common central chimney will give one flue for use whatever may…

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding- the Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the camp grounds. This camp, which was organized for a camp of instruction and drill, was situated about sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on a field of seventy-five acres, on the banks of the Miami River, surrounded by high bluffs. The Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus Railroad passed directly through the grounds, and this road was guarded for miles by sentries in order to watch bridges, telegraph wires and culverts, as spies were infesting the whole country. There were 18,000 men in camp, including the splendid Kentucky Regiment of Guthrie Grays, and quarters were erected for 20,000 men, who were soon on the ground. The tents were rough-board shanties, but were comfortable, and the officers had marquees erected in the rear of the regimental quarters. This brigade was under the command of General Cox, a West Point officer, and under the immediate supvervision of General George B. McClellan. It was in a beautiful location, and the troops were kept under a very strict surveillance, there being but few spectators allowed to visit the ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Dennison

"Camp Dennison, sixteen miles above Cincinnati, on the banks of the Miami River, General Cox commanding-…

"Camp kettles can be hung on a support consisting of a green pole lying in the crotches of two upright posts of the same character. A narrow trench for the fire, about 1 foot deep, dug under the pole, not only protects the fire from the wind but saves fuel." — Moss, 1914

Camp kettle

"Camp kettles can be hung on a support consisting of a green pole lying in the crotches of two upright…

"A still greater economy of fuel can be effected by digging a similar trench in the direction of the wind and slightly narrower than the diameter of the kettles. The kettles are then placed on the trench and the space between tthe kettles filled in with stones, clay, etc., leaving the flue running beneath the kettles. The draft can be improved by building a chimney of stones, clay, etc., at the leeward end of the flue." — Moss, 1914

Camp kitchen

"A still greater economy of fuel can be effected by digging a similar trench in the direction of the…

An illustration of makeshift military camp.

Military Camp

An illustration of makeshift military camp.

A little girl collecting berries while her dog watches, and her parents chop wood in the background.

Camping

A little girl collecting berries while her dog watches, and her parents chop wood in the background.

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's dress, entered the Peloponnesian camp, and provoked a quarrel with a soldier, by whom he was killed." — Goodrich, 1844

Codrus slain

"Determined to save his own country at the expense of his own life, Codrus disguised himself in a peasant's…

A large, circular Chinese encampment.

Chinese encampment

A large, circular Chinese encampment.

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair Oaks, VA. The peculiarities of the States and nationalities as were represented in the Federal Army developed themselves in a variety of ways. At Fortress Monroe the German regiments erected bowers in which they quaffed their lager and smoked, while their regimental bands played airs which led them back by the ear to Das Vaterland; and the Garibaldi Guard made their tents as much like Swiss cottages as possible. The First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel A. Sully, little dreaming how soon they would have to abandon their handiwork to the enemy, erected a fort around the commodious farm house near Fair Oaks, which, after the battle of Seven Pines, May 31st, 1862, had been given to their captains and lieutenants for their quarters. The appearance was so strange that an officer of General McClellan's staff made a sketch and sent it to us." — Frank Leslie, 1896

First Minnesota Regiment

"Fort built around the officer's quarters of the First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Sully, near Fair…

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit of General Price." —Leslie, 1896

Freemont's troops

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit…

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras inlet, N.C. This camp, was formed when Federal troops occupied the island. It first recieved Colonel Bendix and his German regiment. On their return to Newport News it was taken possession of by the Ninth Zouaves; who vacated it upon the arrival of the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, October 5, 1861, the Ninth removing to Camp Wool.

Fort Hatteras

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras…

"And Judas said: Gird yourselves, and be valiant men, and be ready against the morning, that you may fight with these nations that are assembled against us to destroy us and our sanctuary. For it is better for us to die in battle, than to see the evils of our nation, and of the holies: Nevertheless as it shall be the will of God in heaven so be it done." 1 Maccabees 3:58-60 DRA
<p>Judas Machabeus rallies his troops for the coming battle against Gorgias.

Judas Speaks to His Army

"And Judas said: Gird yourselves, and be valiant men, and be ready against the morning, that you may…

"Soldiers Making Camp." &mdash; Greenough, 1899

Making Camp

"Soldiers Making Camp." — Greenough, 1899

"Manassasas Junction, showing the evacuated Confederate fortifications, abondoned camps and wagons, and the ruins of the railway depot and other buildings burnt by the Confederates. The sight here cannot be portrayed. The large machine shops, the station houses, the commissary and quartermaster store houses, all in ashes. On the track stood the wreck of a locomotive, and not far down the remains of four freight cars which had been burned; to the right 500 barrels of flour had been stored, and 200 barrels of vinegar and molasses had been allowed to try experiments in chemical combinations; some 50 barrels of pork and beef had been scattered around in the mud, and a few hundred yards down the track a dense cloud of smoke was arising from the remains of a factory which had been used for rendering tallow and boiling bones." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Manassasas Junction

"Manassasas Junction, showing the evacuated Confederate fortifications, abondoned camps and wagons,…

Three men gathered closing around a small fire.

Men and Fire

Three men gathered closing around a small fire.

The bed in which Napoleon I used while away from home.

Napoleon's Camp Bed

The bed in which Napoleon I used while away from home.

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications, Yorktown, VA., April 10th, 1862. On the 5th of April, 1862, the Federal advance neared the centre of the Confederate position, and found that its fortifications commanded the approach to Yorktown. It was here that Captain Martin's Massachusetts battery opened upon the enemy's forts and made several splendid shots. The Confederates returned the fire, killing a Federal gunner; a second shot wounded another, and a third killed one and wounded two more. The excellence of this practice immediately convinced Captain Martin that he had unfortunately placed his battery in front of a Confederate target. He consequently withdrew to the camp in the woods. The scene our artist has sketched is about one mile from Yorktown, and is in that part of the peninsula where it is only eight miles from river to river." —Leslie, 1896

Camp of Ninth Massachusetts

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications,…

Picture of Osceola arrested and taken prsioner.

Arrest of Osceola

Picture of Osceola arrested and taken prsioner.

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Camp Princeton, taken from the intenchments constructed by the brigade at the junction of the Alexandria and Columbia Roads." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Princeton

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"Encampment of the Federal army near Rolla, Mo. The city of Rolla has been famous since the death of heroic Lyon, when the scattered forces of that glorious but disastrous day, under the guidance of General Siegel, made their first secure resting place. Our illustration is particularly interesting, as it takes in the last encampment of the Federal Army, showing the positions of the chief divisions of Generals Asboth, Siegel and Wymans. Rolla is on the direct route of the railroad from St. Louis to Springfield, being about midway between those cities. It is about sixty miles from Pilot Knob and fifty from Jefferson City. Our artist said: "The high rolling country around Rolla is admirably adapted for a camping ground. Fine streams of clear water intersect in all directions; the ground is gravelly and dry, and all the hills are covered with oak timber. The camping grounds are all gently sloping, facing the south, and are well protected from the cold north and northwest winds by the high ridges on the north."" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Rolla camp

"Encampment of the Federal army near Rolla, Mo. The city of Rolla has been famous since the death of…

"A prophetic birds eye view of Ruhleben Prison Camp when the war ends."-1916; Drawing by Hobart Egremont, one of the interned.

Ruhleben Prison Camp

"A prophetic birds eye view of Ruhleben Prison Camp when the war ends."-1916; Drawing by Hobart Egremont,…

An illustration of three soldiers reading in a tent.

Soldiers Reading

An illustration of three soldiers reading in a tent.

Soup line at Ruhleben Prison Camp-1916

Soup line

Soup line at Ruhleben Prison Camp-1916

A simple "A" tent.

"A" Tent

A simple "A" tent.

The simple A-Tent.

"A" Tent

The simple A-Tent.

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

Missionary Tent

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

A wall tent, a style of tent with more headroom.

Wall Tent

A wall tent, a style of tent with more headroom.

"Scene in camp life- company mess of the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers in their camp before Corinth, Miss." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers

"Scene in camp life- company mess of the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers in their camp before Corinth,…

Soldiers outside a few tents.

Winter Scene in Camp

Soldiers outside a few tents.

A woman and a dog standing outside a wigwam.

Woman

A woman and a dog standing outside a wigwam.

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. This famous body of fiery and active soldiers at length got free from the trammels and confinement of their city quarters, a change which was both pleasant and beneficial to them. They were encamped on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and, as our sketch will show, were most comfortably situated. Colonel Ellsworth was indefatigable in drilling his regiment, and his men most willingly seconded his efforts by close attention to duty and alacrity in the performance of all the details of camp life. The Zuoaves proved to be one of the most effective regiments in the field; they rendered efficent service in building breastworks on the outskirts of Alexandria, thereby preyenting the possibility of a surprise from the enemy, and distinguished themselves at the Battle of Bull Run in their successful assault on a confederate battery at the point of the bayonet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Zouaves

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington,…