"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States vessels <em>Pawnee</em>, <em>Yankee</em>, <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, <em>Anacosta</em>, and <em>Resolute</em>, June 1st, 1861. On May 31st Captain Ward, in command on board of the <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, and assisted by two more of his gunboats, the <em>Resolute</em> and the <em>Anacosta</em>, began the attack on the Confederate batteries, and after a two hours' fight, succeeded in silencing the batteries at the landing; but, for want of long-range ammunition, could not effectually respond to the heavy fire from the heights, and so had to withdraw. The following day, however, with aditional aid from the <em>Pawnee</em> and <em>Yankee</em>, the attack was resumed, and the batteries were at last silenced and the Confederates compelled to retreat."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Acquia Creek

"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States…

When General McClellan reached Locst Hill, on april 2nd, 1862, he found fifty-eight thousand men and much of his artillery there. The following day he moved his whole army toward Yorktown, in order to prevent, if possible, Johnston's re-enforcement of General Magruder, expecting to receive in time for the co-operation of the naval force in Hampton Roads, which he thought would reduce the Confederate batteries both on the James and York Rivers.

Advance of the Federal Army towards Yorktown

When General McClellan reached Locst Hill, on april 2nd, 1862, he found fifty-eight thousand men and…

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel Beard, in the United States transport steamer <em>Darlington</em>, picking off Confederate sharpshooters concealed in the trees on the banks of the Sapelo River, Ga."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

African American Volunteers

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel…

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Runyon's aid-de-camp, Captain James B. mulligan, of Elizabeth, N. J." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Aid-de-camp

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"Rear Admiral Alden, born in Portland, Me., March 31st, 1810, died in San Francisco, Cal., February 6th, 1877. He was appointed midshipman in 1828, and in that capacity accompanied the Wilkes Exploring Expedition around the world in 1838-'42. He was commissioned lieutenant in 1841, and served during the Mexican War, being present at the capture of Vera Cruz, Tuspan and Tabasco. In 1855-'56 he was actively engaged in the Indian war on Puget's Sound. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was in command of the steamer <em>South Carolina</em>, re-enforced Fort Pickens, Fla. and was in an engagement at Galveston, Tex. He commanded the sloop of war <em>Richmond</em> at the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip and the capture of New Orleans, April, 1862, and was also at Port Hudson. He was made captain in 1863, and commanded the <em>Brooklyn</em>, participating in the capture of Mobile Bay, August, and in the two attacks on Fort Fisher. He was commissioned commodore in 1866, and two years later was placed in charge of the navy yard at Mare Island, Cal. In 1869 he was appointed chief of the bureau of navigation and detail in the Navy Department. He was promoted to the rank of rear admiral in 1871 and assigned command of the European Squadron."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Rear Admiral James Alden

"Rear Admiral Alden, born in Portland, Me., March 31st, 1810, died in San Francisco, Cal., February…

"General Alger served in the Civil War."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Russell A. Alger

"General Alger served in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Major Robert Anderson, the commander of Fort Sumter at the time of its fall, was born in Kentucky in the year 1805, and graduated at West Point in 1825. He was actively engaged through the Mexican War, and was severely wounded at Molino del Rey. In recognition of his services of his services at Fort Sumter he was appointed brigadier general by President Lincoln. He was relieved from duty in October, 1861, on account of failing health. He died in France in 1871."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Major Robert Anderson

"Major Robert Anderson, the commander of Fort Sumter at the time of its fall, was born in Kentucky in…

Robert Anderson (1805 - 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War. He is most known for his command of Fort Sumter during the beginning of the war. He is referred to as Major Robert Anderson for his rank at Fort Sumter.

Major Robert Anderson

Robert Anderson (1805 - 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War. He is most known for…

(1805-1871) Soldier during the Civil War who commanded the Federal Garrison at Fort Sumter the signaled the beginning of the Civil War.

Robert Anderson

(1805-1871) Soldier during the Civil War who commanded the Federal Garrison at Fort Sumter the signaled…

Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

Union Prisoners Confined at the Confederate Prison at Andersonville

Union soldiers being held at Andersonville, a Confederate prison.

"The anglo-Confederate steamer <em>Anglia</em>, captured off Bull's Bay, twenty-five miles north of Charleston, S. C., by the United States gunboats <em>Restless</em> and <em>Flag</em>, Sunday, October 19th, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Anglia

"The anglo-Confederate steamer Anglia, captured off Bull's Bay, twenty-five miles north of…

"Capture of the British steamer <em>Anne</em> laden with arms and munition of war for the Confederates, by the United States gunboat <em>Kanawha</em>, acting master partridge, from under the guns of Fort Morgan, Mobile, June 29th, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Anne

"Capture of the British steamer Anne laden with arms and munition of war for the Confederates,…

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Antietam

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th,…

"The dedication of the Antietam National Cemetary, at Sharpsburg, Md., on Tuesday, September 17th, 1867. The dedication of the National Cemetary at Antietam took place on the 17th of September. The invitations were issued from Baltimore, and a limited number were distributed to the most distinguished persons at the Capital, including the President and his Cabinet and the Diplomatic Corps. The people had come from far and near to witness the imposing ceremonies over the dead heroes who, nearly five thousand in number, lie buried on the loftiest ground of the Antietam battlefield. Here it was, on consecrated ground, that give thousand people assembled to witness the ceremonies over their dead defenders. After a prayer, a hymn was sung to the tune of 'Old Hundred' by all present. Then came the Masonic ceremony of laying the corner stone of the monument. After an oration by Ex-Governor Bradford and a few remarks by the President, the ceremonies were brought to a close."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Antietam National Cemetary

"The dedication of the Antietam National Cemetary, at Sharpsburg, Md., on Tuesday, September 17th, 1867.…

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg,…

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle…

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming the Confederate position, after a desperate conflict of four hours, Wednesday, September 17th, 1862. On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge, after an obstinate contest of four hours' duration and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed, and finding the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, advanced in line of battle on their new position, about half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on the advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hillin front of the enemy's batteries they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. The Federals, though terribly decimated, gave them a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Antietam- the opening of the fight- Hooker's division fording the Great Antietam Creek to attack the Confederate army under General lee, ten o'clock A. M., September 17th, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam- the opening of the fight- Hooker's division fording the Great Antietam Creek to…

"Battle of Antietam. The centre and right wing of General McClellan's Army, commanded by Generals Hooker, Sumner and Franklin, engaged with the Confederate Army, led by Generals Longstreet, Jackson and Lee, September 17th, 1862. Our sketch was taken about ten o'clock in the morning of the 17th of September, and represents the centre and right wing of the Federal army engaged with the Confederate centre and left, commanded by Generals Longstreet and Jackson. Hooker's division was then just on the point of crossing the creek, which they did in splendid style. Thus at the close of the engagement the federal troops occupied every position held in the morning by the Confederates, who retreated behind Sharpsburg, from which they escaped over the Potomac next night. Our illustration gives an excellent idea of the nature of the struggle, and the ground over which it was fought, which admitted of much fairer fighting than the jungles of Virginia. Since Waterloo there has been no struggle so long and so fiercely contested, and with an army spread over so wide an extent- the extreme end of the right wing, under Hooker, being three miles distant from the extreme left of Burnside, whose Hawkins's Zouave charge concluded this hard-fought day. At seven o'clock the last gun was fired, and the armies, victorious and vanquished, rested for the night."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam. The centre and right wing of General McClellan's Army, commanded by Generals Hooker,…

"The battle of Antietam. The One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment of Volunteers burying the Confederate dead, Friday, September 19th, 1862. This spot was the scene of one of the most desperate conflicts of the war. This scene of the burial of the dead by the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers is a most interesting part of Antietam battlefield, it being the post where one of the most murderous conflicts took place. The ditch shown in the sketch at nearly right angles was used by the Confederates as a rifle-pit, and from its shelter many a destructive volley was poured upon the Federals. After much manoeuvring, the Irish Brigade managed to get on a slight elevation, which commanded a portion of the ditch, while the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment took up another. The Confederates, finding themselves between two fires, retreated, but not till they had lost many men. The next day, when the One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment was detailed to burty the dead, it found one hundred and thirty-eight dead Confederates in this ditch, a proof of the desperate tenacity with chich the position had been defended."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"The battle of Antietam. The One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Regiment of Volunteers burying the…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's Zouaves on the Confederate battery on the hill, right bank of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, September 17th, 1862, utter route of the Confederates. This brilliant and decisive charge was made about five o'clock in the afternoon of Wednesday, September 17th. Our correspondent thus described the charge: 'On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge after an obstinate contest of several hours duration, and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed and found the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, and advanced in line of battle on the enemy's new position, about a half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on our advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receiving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hill in front of the enemy's batteries, they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall, about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. Our men, though terribly decimated, gave a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and, although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Burnside's Division, left wing- brilliant and decisive bayonet charge of Hawkins's…

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg. The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg.…

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near…

Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

Battlefield of Antietam

Shows empty rural area, with a column of troops moving over a bridge.

"Capture of the United States mail steamer <em>Ariel</em>, Captain Jones, off the east end of Cuba, by the pirate <em>Alabama</em> ('290'), Captain Semmes, December 7th, 1862. Report of the first officer of the <em>Ariel</em>: 'On the 7th of December, at 1:30 P.M., when rounding Cape Maysi, the eastern point of Cuba, we saw a vessel about four miles to the westward, close under the high land, bark-rigged and under canvas. As there was nothing in her appearance indicating her to be a steamer, her smokepipe being down, no suspicions were aroused until in a short time we saw she had furled her sails, raised her smokestack, and was rapidly nearing us under steam, the American flag flying at her peak. Such was her speed in comparison to ours that in about half an hour she had come up within half a mile of us, when she fired a lee gun, hauled down the American ensign and ran up the Confederate flag. No attention was paid to the summons, and the <em>Ariel</em> was pushed to her utmost speed. She then sailed across our wake, took a position on our port quarter, about four hundred yards distant, and fired two guns almost simultaneously, one shot passing over the hurricane deck, and the other hitting the foremast and cutting it half away. A body of United States marines, consisting of 126 men, passengers on board the <em>Ariel</em>, had been drawn up and armed, but the officers in command deemed it worse than folly to resist, as we could plainly see they were training a full broadside to bear upon us, and Captain Jones gave orders to stop the ship and haul down the ensign.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Ariel

"Capture of the United States mail steamer Ariel, Captain Jones, off the east end of Cuba,…

"Capture of the Anglo-Confederate steamer <em>Aries</em> off Bull's Bay, near Charleston, S. C., by the United States gunboat <em>Stettin</em>."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Aries

"Capture of the Anglo-Confederate steamer Aries off Bull's Bay, near Charleston, S. C., by…

"The capture of Arkansas Post, Ark. General Stephen G. Burbridge, accompanied by his staff, planting the Stars and Stripes on Fort Hindman, January 11th, 1863. No sooner was the fort surrendered than General Burbridge and his staff sprang across the ditch, mounted the parapet, and planted the flag of the republic upon its bloody battlements, thus making a fitting <em>finale</em> to one of the most glorious achievements of the war. The number of prisoners surrendered was 5,000, the Federal forces in action being 27,000. An immense quantity of quartemaster's, commissary and ordinance stores were also obtained, among which were 20 guns, 8,000 stands of small arms, and 100 army wagons, with herds of horses and mules."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Arkansas Post

"The capture of Arkansas Post, Ark. General Stephen G. Burbridge, accompanied by his staff, planting…

Destruction of the <em>Arkansas</em> during the Battle of Baton Rouge naval battle.

Destruction of the Arkansas

Destruction of the Arkansas during the Battle of Baton Rouge naval battle.

"The Army of the Ohio was a division of the Federal army in the Civil War; organized in 1861-1862 by General Buell; afterward came under the command of General Rosecrans and was called the Army of the Cumberland. A second department of the Ohio was formed, and was also in 1865 incorporated in the Army of the Cumberland."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Badge of the Army of the Cumberland

"The Army of the Ohio was a division of the Federal army in the Civil War; organized in 1861-1862 by…

"General Arthur, twenty-first President of the United States, born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vt., October 5th, 1830; died in New York City, November 18th, 1896."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Chester A. Arthur

"General Arthur, twenty-first President of the United States, born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vt.,…

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- loading."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Artillery practice

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- loading."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- officer giving the word of command to fire."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Artillery practice

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- officer giving the word of command to fire."—…

An illustration of Atlanta, Georgia as depicted in 1874. Atlanta, GA is the capital and the most populous city in the state of Georgia. During the American Civil War, Atlanta served as an important railroad and military supply hub. In 1864, the city became the target of a major Union invasion. The area now covered by Atlanta was the scene of several battles. The rebuilding of the city was gradual. From 1867 until 1888, U.S. Army soldiers occupied McPherson Barracks in southwest Atlanta to ensure Reconstruction era reforms.

Atlanta, Georgia

An illustration of Atlanta, Georgia as depicted in 1874. Atlanta, GA is the capital and the most populous…

"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants after driving in the Federal pickets moved up steadily, and, with a steady step, opened out when within four hundred yards of the fortification. Meeting no force, the assailants took courage, and when within three hundred yards raised a tremendous yell and started on the double quick; but at that instant the signal was given, and every battery, double-shotted with canister, was let loose, and the apparently deserted fortification was lined with heads, and at every foot a shining musket was aimed at the assailants. The destroying volley swept in a single instant hundreds of men into eternity, and laid thousands upon the earth maimed, many of them for life, on the plains before Atlanta. They awaited no second fire; another, and the army would have been destroyed. They therefore sought shelter beyond the range of the Federal guns."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Atlanta

"The Siege of Atlanta, Ga.- Confederate attack on General Logan's Corps, July 28th, 1864. The assailants…

Attack on the Union troops in Baltimore.

Attack in Baltimore

Attack on the Union troops in Baltimore.

Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This view is southwest. The attack of General Smith was from the ground behind the house on the right.

Attack of the Gunboats at Fort Donelson

Attack of the gunboats at Fort Donelson, one of the most influential battles in American history. This…

"General Augur, born in New York in 1821, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1843. During the Mexican War he served as aid-de-camp to General Hopping, and after his death to General Caleb Cushing. He was promoted captain, August 1st, 1852, and served with distinction in a campaign against the Indians in Oregon in 1856. On May 14th, 1861, he was appointed major in the Thirteenth Infantry, and was for a time commandant of cadets at West Point. In November of that year he was commissioned a brigadier general of volunteers, and joined McDowell's corps. In July, 1862, he was assigned to a division under Banks, and in the battle of Cedar Mountain was severely wounded. He was promoted major general of volunteers, August 9th, 1862, and in November joined his corps and took part in the Louisiana campaign. He was breveted brigadier-general in the United States Army, March 13th, 1865, receiving on the same date the brevet of major-general for services in the field during the rebellion." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

General Christopher C. Augur

"General Augur, born in New York in 1821, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1843.…

"General Averill, born in Cameron, Steuben County, N. Y., November 5th, 1832, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in June, 1855, and assigned to the mounted riflemen. He was promoted to be first lieutenant of the mounted riflemen, May 14th, 1861, and was on staff duty in the neighborhood of Washington, participating in the battle of Bull Run and other engagements, until August 23rd, 1861, when he was appointed colonel of the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry. He was engaged with the Army of the Potomac in its most important campaigns. In March, 1863, he began the series of cavalry raids in Western Virginia that made his name famous. His services were continuous up to May, 1865, whn he resigned, having been brevetted major general in the meantime." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General W. W. Averill

"General Averill, born in Cameron, Steuben County, N. Y., November 5th, 1832, was graduated at the United…

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering their mules in the Rappahannock. General Pleasonton's cavalry was attended by a very efficient forage brigade, consisting of mules and [African American] riders. Our sketch represents their drivers taking them to water at the river. The hard work these animals will endure is something wonderful, and justifies the high estimation in which they are held in the army." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage train

"[African American] drivers of the baggage train attached to General Pleasonton's Cavalry brigade watering…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents a Federal baggage train hastening on to Falmouth with commissary stores for General Burnside's army before the crossing of the Rappahannock to attack Fredericksburg. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in this region may be conceived by our sketch. The fearful road over rocks and cliffs, the storms, the constant fear of surprise by the enemy, where escape and defense are alike impossible, give to the life of the army train all the perils of romance."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Baggage Train

"Federal baggage train on its way to the army at Falmouth, VA., December, 1862. Our illustration represents…

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant. On the 12th General Grant overtook General Gregg at Raymond, and after a stubborn fight defeated him, Gregg retreating with a loss of 7,000 men. Having been joined by reinforcements under General Walker, Gregg made a stand the next day at Mississippi Springs, but Grant again defeated him. On the 14th, in a still warmer engagement, he utterly defeated Gregg, who lost 400 men and 17 cannon, and fled through Jackson, firing the Capitol and many depots, storehouses and dwellings. On the 16th he met General Pemberton, with the whole garrison of Vicksburg, at Baker's Creek, and defeated him, driving him back toward Vicksburg, with a loss of 29 pieces of artillery and 4,000 men, and cutting him off from all hopes of relief. Pressing rapidly on, Grant, on the 17th, overtook Pemberton at Big Black River Bridge, and again defeated him, with a loss of 2,600 men and 17 guns. Pemberton then retired into the city, which Grant invested."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Baker's Creek

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant.…

Colonel Edward Dickinson Baker (1811 - 1861) who served for the state of Illinois in the U.S. House of Representatives and later as a U.S. Senator from Oregon. Baker served as a colonel during the Mexican-American War and the Civil War where he was killed in the Battle of Ball's Bluff becoming the only sitting senator to be killed in the Civil War.

Colonel Edward Dickinson Baker

Colonel Edward Dickinson Baker (1811 - 1861) who served for the state of Illinois in the U.S. House…

"General Baker, Chief of the United States Secret Service, born in Stafford, Genesee County, N. Y., October 13th, 1826, died in Philadelphia, Pa., July 2nd, 1868. In 1848 he went to New York and Philadelphia, and in 1853 to San Francisco, in each of these cities working as a mechanic. When the lawless element became dominant in San Francisco, in 1856, General Baker joined the Vigilance Committee and took an active part in the summary proceedings that restored order in the city. He went to New York on business in 1861, expecting to return at once, but the Civil War intervened, and he went to Washington and offered his services. At the suggestion of General Hiram Walbridge, of New York, he was introduced to General Scott, and as a result of the interview he started on foot for Richmond, where, in spite of arrest, imprisonment and several interviews with Jefferson Davis, while under suspension as a spy, he succeeded in collecting much information and returning to Washington after an absence of three weeks. This was but the first of a series of adventures involving high executive ability and a wonderful talent for tracing conspiracy and frustrating the designs of Confederate spies and agents. He was commissioned colonel, and subsequently brigadier general. His duties naturally made him enemies in influential quarters, and charges of a serious nature were several times preferred against him, but were never substantiated. When President Lincoln was assassinated General Baker organized the pursuit of the murderer, and was present at his capture and death."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Lafayette C. Baker

"General Baker, Chief of the United States Secret Service, born in Stafford, Genesee County, N. Y.,…

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg, which was fought on October 21, 1861, in Loudon County, Virginia. It was the second largest battle of the Eastern Theater in 1861. In the center of the sketch is Colonel Edward Dickinson Baker who was killed during the battle.

Battle of Ball's Bluff

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg,…

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg, which was fought on October 21, 1861, in Loudon County, Virginia. It was the second largest battle of the Eastern Theater in 1861.

Battle of Ball's Bluff

The Battle of Ball's Bluff is also known as the Battle of Harrison's Island or the Battle of Leesburg,…

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the hurricane deck of the United States transport <em>North Star</em>- the soldiers of the Forty-first Massachusetts Regiment writing home to their friends, upon their arrival at ship island, Gulf of Mexico. We publish a sketch taken on the evening of the arrival of the Forty-first Massachusetts Regiment at Ship Island. The thoughts of the dear ones at home were uppermost in every soldier's mind, and in a very short time the hurricane deck of the steamer <em>North Star</em> was occupied by a regiment of letterwriters, all hard at work in the service of Cadmus. It is only those separated from all they hold dear who can realize the luxury of that invention which wafts a sigh from Indus to the Pole."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks Expedition

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the hurricane deck of the United States transport North Star-…

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the levee, Baton Rouge, La. Contrabands unloading military stores from the United States transport <em>North Star</em>, over the Mississippi steamer <em>Iberville</em>. The <em>Iberville</em> had quite a history in connection with the military operations on the Mississippi. She was taken possession of by the United States authorities on the surrender of New Orleans, and was engaged as a transport during the expedition. She several times ran the gantlet of Confederate batteries and guerrillas. On one occasion she sustained a running fire from a battery of six guns for at least twenty minutes, while passing Donaldsonville, having four men killed and four wounded, one of her engines disabled and her upper works riddled."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks Expedition

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the levee, Baton Rouge, La. Contrabands unloading military stores from…

"Banks's Expedition- Executive Officer Parker, of the United States gunboat <em>Essex</em>, hoisting the national standard on the state capitol, Baton Rouge, La., on its occupation by the Federal forces commanded by General Grover, December 17th, 1863."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks's Expedition

"Banks's Expedition- Executive Officer Parker, of the United States gunboat Essex, hoisting…

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

Headquarters of Banks

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

"General Barlow, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 18th, 1834, was graduated at Harvard in 1855. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in the Twelfth Regiment, New York State National Guard, and went to the front of the first call for troops to defend the capital. At the end of the three months' term of service he had been promoted lieutenant. He at once re-entered the service as lieutenant colonel of the Sixty-first New York Volunteers, was promoted colonel during the siege of Yorktown, and distinguished himself at the battle of Fair Oaks, May 31st and June 1st, 1862, for which he was severely wounded and taken prisoner; but he was exchanged, and recovered in time to take the field again the following spring. He also participated inthe final campaigns of the Potomac Army under General Grant."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Francis C. Barlow

"General Barlow, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 18th, 1834, was graduated at Harvard in 1855. In 1861…

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Battle of Baton Rouge

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil…

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December 30th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Baton Rouge

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December…

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle…

"Interior of Battery Gregg, looking toward Wagner."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battery Gregg

"Interior of Battery Gregg, looking toward Wagner."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, near the Relay House, in 1861. The Relay House was a small railroad station about seven miles from Baltimore, on the Northern Central Railroad. It was of small population and trade, but its position elevated it into considerable importance. Immediately after the troubles in Baltimore this position was seized upon, and General Butler made it his headquarters, and by so doing not only held the control of the railrod to Harper's Ferry and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Patapsco River, but threatened the city of Baltimore with a strong military force. The Relay House was romantically situated in a country of exquisite natural beauty. Our sketch shows the battery stationed to command the viaduct, with the Relay House in the distance." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bouquet Battery

"The Bouquet Battery, commanding the viaduct over the Patapsco River, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad,…

An illustration of a battle in 1861.

Battle

An illustration of a battle in 1861.