Gustav Adolph was the founder of the Swedish Empire at the beginning of what is widely regarded as the Golden Age of Sweden.

King Gustaf Adolph

Gustav Adolph was the founder of the Swedish Empire at the beginning of what is widely regarded as the…

King of Sweden.

Gustavus Adolphus

King of Sweden.

King of Spain.

Alfonso XII

King of Spain.

Alfonso XIII, King of Spain.

Alfonso XIII

Alfonso XIII, King of Spain.

"Alfred the Great." — Lardner, 1885

Alfred the Great

"Alfred the Great." — Lardner, 1885

King Alfred

King Alfred

King Alfred

"This sovereign was the last of the Mogul emperors of India who displayed the talent and energy of a warrior. He was the grandson of Jehangire, and was born on the 22nd of October, 1618." — Goodrich, 1844

Aurungzrbr

"This sovereign was the last of the Mogul emperors of India who displayed the talent and energy of a…

(1769-1821) King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine, born Napoleone di Buonaparte.

Napoleon Bonaparte

(1769-1821) King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of…

Brian Boroimhe, King of Munster.

Boroimhe

Brian Boroimhe, King of Munster.

"Canute." — Lardner, 1885

Canute

"Canute." — Lardner, 1885

Karl Eitel Friedrich Zephyrinus Ludqig von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, King of Romania.

Carol I

Karl Eitel Friedrich Zephyrinus Ludqig von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, King of Romania.

He was born on April 2, 742, and was the eldest son of Pepin, the first king of the Franks, of the Carlovingian dynasty.

Charlemagne

He was born on April 2, 742, and was the eldest son of Pepin, the first king of the Franks, of the Carlovingian…

Charlemagne (Charles the Great) was king of the Franks during the Middle Ages.

Charlemagne

Charlemagne (Charles the Great) was king of the Franks during the Middle Ages.

An illustration of the profile of Charlemagne, also known as Charles the Great, was King of the Franks from 768 to his death. He expanded the Frankish kingdoms into a Frankish Empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe.

Profile of Charlemagne

An illustration of the profile of Charlemagne, also known as Charles the Great, was King of the Franks…

"Charles I (1625-1649) was a far abler ruler than his father. He was a man of greater courage and more dignity of character, but he had been trained from infancy in the belief of his divine right to fule, and he chose ministers who encouraged him in this view and tried to apply it practically. Parliament was not disposed to be amiable after the wrongs it had suffered at the hands of James. In the first fifteen months of his reign two Parliaments were summoned and angrily dissolved; the first because it demanded that its grievances should be redressed before it granted the king the requisite supplies; the second because it impeached the king's minister, Buckingham. In the interval between the second and third Parliaments the king raised money by forced loans and benevolences, throwing into prison those who refused to comply with the illegal demands. Under the influence of Buckingham the king tried to divert the attention of his subjects from bad government at home by entering into a war with France; but the result was humiliating, and the king's minister was more hated than ever."—Colby, 1899

Charles I

"Charles I (1625-1649) was a far abler ruler than his father. He was a man of greater courage and more…

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles I

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 to 1649.

Charles the I was king of England, Scotland and Ireland until he was executed in 1649.

Charles I attended by the Marquis of Hamilton

Charles the I was king of England, Scotland and Ireland until he was executed in 1649.

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. Charles famously engaged in a struggle for power with the Parliament of England. He was an advocate of the Divine Right of Kings, and many subjects of England feared that he was attempting to gain absolute power. Many of his actions, particularly the levying of taxes without Parliament's consent, caused widespread opposition.

Charles I of England

Charles I, (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from…

King of England (1625-1649)

Charles I, King of England

King of England (1625-1649)

King of England

Charles II

King of England

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Charles II

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 - 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. According to royalists (and retrospective English law), Charles II became king when his father Charles I was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, the climax of the English Civil War. The English Parliament did not proclaim Charles II king at this time, passing a statute making it unlawful, and England entered the period known to history as the English Interregnum. The Parliament of Scotland, on the other hand, proclaimed Charles II King of Scots on 5 February 1649 in Edinburgh. He was crowned King of Scots at Scone on 1 January 1651.

Charles II of England

Charles II (Charles Stuart; 29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland,…

(1294-132) King of France from 1322-1328

King Charles IV of France

(1294-132) King of France from 1322-1328

(1068-1135) King of England 1100-1135 and the Duke of Normandy 1106-1135

King Henry I of France

(1068-1135) King of England 1100-1135 and the Duke of Normandy 1106-1135

Emperor of Germany and King of Spain.

Charles V

Emperor of Germany and King of Spain.

"Charles V ruled over wider dominions than any European sovereign since Charlemagne. He belonged to the famous house of Hapsburg, from which he inherited Austria."—Colby, 1899

Charles V

"Charles V ruled over wider dominions than any European sovereign since Charlemagne. He belonged to…

(1500-1558) Charles V was the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.

Charles V

(1500-1558) Charles V was the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.

(1500-1558) Charles V was the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.

Charles V

(1500-1558) Charles V was the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain.

(--) King of France

Charles VI of France

(--) King of France

(1403-1461) King of France. During his reign , Joan of Arc led the troops and the war against Britain came to an end.

Charles VII of France

(1403-1461) King of France. During his reign , Joan of Arc led the troops and the war against Britain…

(--) King of France

Charles VIII of France

(--) King of France

(1818-1906) Crowned King of Denmark in 1863

Christian IX

(1818-1906) Crowned King of Denmark in 1863

King Edgar was king of England.

King Edgar

King Edgar was king of England.

Edward I of England.

Edward I

Edward I of England.

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks, achieved historical fame as the monarch who conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeded in doing the same to Scotland. However, his death led to his son Edward II taking the throne and ultimately failing in his attempt to subjugate Scotland. Longshanks reigned from 1272 to 1307, ascending the throne of England on 20 November 1272 after the death of his father, King Henry III. His mother was queen consort Eleanor of Provence.

Edward I (Longshanks)

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks, achieved historical fame…

Edward II of England

Edward II

Edward II of England

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility in favour of low-born favourites led to constant political unrest and his eventual deposition. Edward is perhaps best remembered for his supposed murder and his alleged homosexuality as well as being the first monarch to establish colleges in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge; he founded Cambridge's King's Hall in 1317 and gave Oxford's Oriel College its royal charter in 1326. Both colleges received the favour of Edward's son, Edward III, who confirmed Oriel's charter in 1327 and refounded King's Hall in 1337

Edward II of England

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307…

King of England

Edward III

King of England

Image taken from the tomb of the English king.

Edward III

Image taken from the tomb of the English king.

Edward III of England.

Edward III

Edward III of England.

King of England

Edward VI

King of England

Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547 and was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine. During Edward's reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council, because he never reached maturity. Edward's reign was marked by economic problems, military withdrawal from Scotland and Boulogne, and social unrest that in 1549 erupted into riot and rebellion. It also saw the transformation of the Anglican Church into a recognizably Protestant body. On Edward's death at the age of 15, the succession was disputed. Jane survived as queen for only nine days, before the Privy Council proclaimed Mary, for whom the people had risen in support in the counties.

Edward VI of England

Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547…

Edward VI (12 October 1537 - 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547 and was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine. The son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, Edward was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first Protestant ruler. During Edward’s reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council, because he never reached maturity. The Council was led from 1547 to 1549 by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, and from 1550 to 1553 by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick, who in 1551 became 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Edward VI of England and Ireland

Edward VI (12 October 1537 - 6 July 1553) became King of England and Ireland on 28 January 1547 and…

Edward VI became King of England and Ireland on January 28, 1547, at just nine years of age. Edward, the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first ruler who was Protestant at the time of his ascension to the throne. Edward's entire rule was mediated through a council of regency as he never reached majority. The council was first led by his uncle, Edward Seymour, and then by John Dudley.

Edward VI. Writing His Journal

Edward VI became King of England and Ireland on January 28, 1547, at just nine years of age. Edward,…

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

Edward VII

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

Prince of Wales, Edward VII, was the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India.

Albert Edward

Prince of Wales, Edward VII, was the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of…

The boy king, Francis II of France.

Francis II

The boy king, Francis II of France.

King of Prussia

Frederic the Great

King of Prussia

Frederick II. King of Prussia.

Frederick II

Frederick II. King of Prussia.

(1712-1786) King of Prussia from the Hohenzollern dynaasty, known as the founder of Germany's military power.

Frederick II

(1712-1786) King of Prussia from the Hohenzollern dynaasty, known as the founder of Germany's military…

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia attempting to find lodging for the evening. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. In his role as a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire, he was Frederick IV of Brandenburg. He became known as Frederick the Great.

Frederick II of Prussia

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia attempting to find lodging for the evening. Frederick II…

A portrait of Frederick II of Prussia in his military uniform. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. He became known as Frederick the Great and was nicknamed "Old Fritz".

Frederick II of Prussia

A portrait of Frederick II of Prussia in his military uniform. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 –…

Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. In his role as a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire, he was Frederick IV of Brandenburg. He became known as Frederick the Great and was nicknamed "Old Fritz".

Frederick II of Prussia

Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from…

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia and the unjust judges. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. In his role as a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire, he was Frederick IV of Brandenburg. He became known as Frederick the Great and was nicknamed "Old Fritz".

Frederick II of Prussia and Judges

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia and the unjust judges. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 –…

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia on horseback. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. In his role as a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire, he was Frederick IV of Brandenburg. He became known as Frederick the Great and was nicknamed "Old Fritz".

Frederick II of Prussia on Horseback

An illustration of Frederick II of Prussia on horseback. Frederick II (January 24, 1712 – August…

Frederick III (October 18, 1831 - June 15, 1888), was German Emperor and King of Prussia, ruling for 99 days until his death on June 15, 1888. Frederick III was a war hero during the Second Schleswig War, the Austro-Prussian War, and the Franco-Prussian War before his reign as German Emperor, yet his father's unusually long reign and longevity never let Frederick III capitalize on his military successes, popularity, and youth as emperor. He was more liberal than previous German leaders and represented a possibility for the earlier liberalization of German society and government. However, Frederick III developed larynx cancer shortly before he assumed the throne which severely limited his time and effectiveness as German Emperor. After his largely ineffectual reign and lost impact on German society, his successor, Wilhelm II, abandoned any path toward liberalization that Frederick III previously leaned towards.

Frederick III, German Emperor

Frederick III (October 18, 1831 - June 15, 1888), was German Emperor and King of Prussia, ruling for…

"Frederick II (The Great, 1740-1786). The young Frederick had been brought up in a rough school. His father's strict training and brutal ways made his life miserable. He could not gratify his waste for study, nor enjoy any liberty of action. Heavy tasks were imposed upon him and he was scolded and punished for the slightest disobedience. Once he tried to escape, but the attempt failed and his tutor who had aided him was hanged. He himself narrowly escaped execution by the decree of a court-martial. The king's death released him from this tyranny and he now found himself the inheritor of a strong state and a splendid army. He was ambitious of military fame and wished to raise Prussia to the first place among European states."—Colby, 1899

Frederick the Great

"Frederick II (The Great, 1740-1786). The young Frederick had been brought up in a rough school. His…

(1831-1888) The second German emperor and eighth King of Prussia.

Fredrick III

(1831-1888) The second German emperor and eighth King of Prussia.

George I (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 until his death, and ruler of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698. George was born in Lower Saxony in what is now Germany, and eventually inherited the title and lands of the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. A succession of European wars expanded his German domains during his lifetime, and in 1708 he was ratified as Prince-elector of Hanover. During George's reign the powers of the monarchy diminished and Britain began a transition to the modern system of Cabinet government led by a Prime Minister. Towards the end of his reign, actual power was held by Sir Robert Walpole, Great Britain's first de facto Prime Minister. George died on a trip to his native Hanover, where he was buried.

King George I of Great Britain

George I (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714…