184 illustrations of birds including: wagtail, warbler, waxwing, weaver-bird, wheat-ear, whinchat, whippoorwill, widgeon, widow-bird, woodcock, woodlark, woodpecker, woodsnipe, wren, wrentits, wryneck, and yellow-throat

"Woodpecker is the popular name of the old Linnæan genus Picus, now greatly divided. Woodpeckers have a slender body, powerful beak, and protrusile tongue, which is sharp, barbed, and pointed, and covered with a glutinous secretion derived from glands in the throat, this coating being renewed every time the tongue is drawn within the bill. The tail is stiff and serves as a support when the birds are clinging to the branches or stems of trees. Woodpeckers are very widely distributed, but abound chiefly in warm climates. They are solitary in habit, and live in the depths of forests. Fruits, seeds, and insects constitute their food, and in pursuit of the latter they exhibit wonderful dexterity, climbing with astonishing quickness on the trunks and branches of trees, and when, by tapping with their bills, a rotten place has been discovered, they dig vigorously in search of the grubs or larvæ beneath the bark."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Green Woodpecker

"Woodpecker is the popular name of the old Linnæan genus Picus, now greatly divided. Woodpeckers…

A green colored woodpecker.

Green Woodpecker

A green colored woodpecker.

The foot of a Green Woodpecker, a bird belonging to the Scansores order. Scansores is an order of birds, popularly known as climbing birds. The most important of the families are the cuckoos, the woodpeckers and wry-necks, the parrots, the toucans, the trogons, the barbets, and the plantain-eaters.

Foot of a Green Woodpecker

The foot of a Green Woodpecker, a bird belonging to the Scansores order. Scansores is an order of birds,…

The head of a Green Woodpecker, a bird belonging to the Scansores order. Scansores is an order of birds, popularly known as climbing birds. The most important of the families are the cuckoos, the woodpeckers and wry-necks, the parrots, the toucans, the trogons, the barbets, and the plantain-eaters.

Head of a Green Woodpecker

The head of a Green Woodpecker, a bird belonging to the Scansores order. Scansores is an order of birds,…

The Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) is a medium-sized woodpecker. Their breeding habitat is forested areas with large trees across most of North America to Central America. They nest in a tree cavity, excavated by the nesting pair.

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) is a medium-sized woodpecker. Their breeding habitat is forested…

"Picus villosus. Hairy Woodpecker. Spotted and lengthwise streaked, but not banded. Usually 9-10 long; outer tail-feathers wholly white. Back black, with a long white stripe down the middle. Quills and wing-coverts with a profusion of white spots; usually 6-7 pairs on the primaries, several on all the secondaries, and one or more on each of the coverts. Four middle tail-feathers black; next pair black and white; next two pairs white, as stated. Under parts white. Crown and sides of head black, with a white stripe over and behind the eye; another from the nasal feathers running below the eye to spread on the side of the neck; a scarlet nuchal band in the male, sometimes broken in two, wanting in the female. Young with the crown mostly red or bronzy, or even yellowish." Elliot Coues, 1884

Hairy Woodpecker

"Picus villosus. Hairy Woodpecker. Spotted and lengthwise streaked, but not banded. Usually 9-10 long;…

Side view of a woodpecker's head.

Woodpecker Head

Side view of a woodpecker's head.

"Campephilus principalis. Ivory-billed Woodpecker. Glossy blue-black; a stripe down side of neck, one at base of bill, the scapulars, under wing-coverts, end of secondaries and of inner primaries, the bill and nasal feathers white; feet grayish-blue; iris yellow. A long pointed crest, in the male scarlet faced with black, in the female black." Elliot Coues, 1884

Ivory-billed Woodpecker

"Campephilus principalis. Ivory-billed Woodpecker. Glossy blue-black; a stripe down side of neck, one…

It is not only to seek for food that Woodpeckers make holes in trees, but also to establish their nests, (Figuier, 1869).

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

It is not only to seek for food that Woodpeckers make holes in trees, but also to establish their nests,…

Common in England and distributed across Europe, the lesser spotted woodpecker measures about five and three-quarter inches in length.

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Common in England and distributed across Europe, the lesser spotted woodpecker measures about five and…

"Dendrocopus minor, or Lesser Spotted Woodpecker, are the British representatives, The colours in this genus are black and white in varied proportions, with crimsons on the head and often on the lower parts; a small amount of buff and brown being not uncommonly added." A. H. Evans, 1900

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

"Dendrocopus minor, or Lesser Spotted Woodpecker, are the British representatives, The colours in this…

"Asyndesmus torquatus. Lewis' Woodpecker. Lared Woodpecker. Adult: Upper parts, including wings and tail, flanks and crissum, green-black with intense bronzy lustre, especially on the back - this iridescence like that of Quiscalus aneus almost. Face dark crimson, in a patch of velvety feathers around bill and eyes. A narrow distant collar around back of neck, and breast, hoary bluish-gray, gradually brightening behind on the under parts to intense rose-red or lake, delicately pencilled in hair lines with the hoary-gray. No white on wings or tail, their under surfaces simply black. Bill blackish; feet greenish-plumbeous. Iris brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Lewis' Woodpecker

"Asyndesmus torquatus. Lewis' Woodpecker. Lared Woodpecker. Adult: Upper parts, including wings and…

Found in Southern Europe, the middle spotted woodpecker has a black coat, with a crimson underside and a red spot on its head.

Middle Spotted Woodpecker

Found in Southern Europe, the middle spotted woodpecker has a black coat, with a crimson underside and…

"Picus scalaris nutalli. Nuttall's Woodpecker. Similar; rather larger' more white, this prevailing on the back over the black bars; nape chiefly white; nasal tufts white; lateral tail-feathers, especially, sparsely or imperfectly barred. The Californian coast race, differing decidedly in some respects, and constantly; but connected with general series of ladder-backs. Barring restricted to the back proper, the hind neck being black, succeeded anteriorly by a white space adjoining the red, wanting in scalaris, where red joins black. Red chiefly confined to the occiput, the rest of the crown black, spotted with white. Lateral tail-feathers white, not barred throughout, having not 1-3 black bars, all beyond their middles, all but the terminal one of these broken. White postocular stripe running into the white nuchal area, but cut off from the white of the shoulders. White maxillary stripe enclosed in black as in scalaris, but this black continuous with the cervical black patch, which is not the case in scalaris. No Smoky-brown state of the under parts observed." Elliot Coues, 1884

Nuttall's Woodpecker

"Picus scalaris nutalli. Nuttall's Woodpecker. Similar; rather larger' more white, this prevailing on…

A wood pecker have the feathers of the pileum elongated and conspicuous.

Pilated Woodpecker

A wood pecker have the feathers of the pileum elongated and conspicuous.

A woodpecker common to Arizona. Usually nests in giant cactus.

Pitahaya Woodpecker

A woodpecker common to Arizona. Usually nests in giant cactus.

"Centurus carolinus. Red-bellied Woodpecker. Whole crown and nape scarlet in the male; nape only so in the female. Sides of head, and under parts, grayish-white, usually with a yellow shade, reddening on the belly; tail black, one or two outer feathers white-barred; inner web of central feathers white with black spots, outer web of the same black with a white space next the shaft for most of its length; white predominating on the rump. Bill and feet dusky plumbeous. Iris red." Elliot Coues, 1884

Red-bellied Woodpecker

"Centurus carolinus. Red-bellied Woodpecker. Whole crown and nape scarlet in the male; nape only so…

"Picus borealis. Red-Cockaded Woodpecker. Body spotted and crosswise banded, but not streaked. Head black on top, with a large silky white auricular patch embracing the eye and extending on the side of the neck, bordered above in the male by a scarlet stripe not meeting its fellow on the nape; nasal feathers and those on the side of the jay white; black of the crown connected across the lores with a black stripe running from the corner of the bill down the side of the breast in black spots continued less thickly along the whole side and on the crissum; under parts otherwise soiled white. Central tail-feathers black; others white, black-barred. Back and wings barred with black and white, the larger quills and many coverts with the white bars resolved into paired spots. Female lacking the red cockade. A peculiar isolated species; wings longer and more pointed than usual in this genus." Elliot Coues, 1884

Red-cockaded Woodpecker

"Picus borealis. Red-Cockaded Woodpecker. Body spotted and crosswise banded, but not streaked. Head…

The Red-headed Woodpecker, Melanerpes erythrocephalus, is a small or medium-sized woodpecker from temperate North America. Their breeding habitat is open country across southern Canada and the eastern-central United States.

Red-Headed Woodpecker

The Red-headed Woodpecker, Melanerpes erythrocephalus, is a small or medium-sized woodpecker from temperate…

"Melanerpes erythrocephalus. Red-headed Woodpecker. Tricolor. Adult: Beautifully tricolor with "the red, white, and blue." Back, wings and tail glossy blue-black; secondaries, upper tail-coverts, under wing-coverts, under parts from the breast, and ends of some outer tail-feathers, white. Whole head, neck and fore breast crimson, usually black-bordered where adjoining the white. The white of hte wings and rump is pure; that of belly usually tinged with ochraceous or reddish; the white quills have black shafts. The red feathers are stiffish and somewhat bristly in their colored portions. The gloss is sometimes green instead of blue. Bill and feet dusky horn-color. Iris brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Red-headed Woodpecker

"Melanerpes erythrocephalus. Red-headed Woodpecker. Tricolor. Adult: Beautifully tricolor with "the…

"Sphyropicus thyroides. Brown-headed Woodpecker. Black-breasted Woodpecker. Red-throated Woodpecker. Williamson's Woodpecker. Adult: Glossy black, including all the tail-feathers. Belly gamboge yellow. A narrow scarlet patch on the throat. Upper tail-coverts, a broad oblique bar on the wing-coverts, a post-ocular stripe, a stripe from nostrils below eye and ear, and small, in part paired, spots on the quills, white. Lining of wings, sides of body, flanks and crissum varied with white, leaving the black in bars and cordate spots. Bill slate-color; feet greenish-gray; iris reddish-brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Red-headed Woodpecker

"Sphyropicus thyroides. Brown-headed Woodpecker. Black-breasted Woodpecker. Red-throated Woodpecker.…

From the woodpecker family, the Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) is known for drilling holes in birch trees.

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker

From the woodpecker family, the Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) is known for drilling…

"Picus martius, the Black Woodpecker, an inhabitant of the pine-forests of Europe and Asia to Japan, quite erroneously asserted to have occurred in England. The colour is black with exception of a red head, while the feathering extends down two-thirds of the metatarsus in front." A. H. Evans, 1900 Distinction between the male and the female can be seen on the crown. The male's is entirely red, while the female's shows just a touch of red on the tip.

The Great Black Woodpecker

"Picus martius, the Black Woodpecker, an inhabitant of the pine-forests of Europe and Asia to Japan,…

"Sphyropicus varius. Yellow-bellied Woodpecker. Male: Crown crimson, bordered all around with black; chin, and breast black, enclosing a large crimson patch on the former (in the male; in the female this patch white); sides of head with a white line starting from the nasal feathers and dividing the black of the throat from a trans-ocular black stripe, this separated from the black of the crown by a white post-ocular stripe; all these stripes frequently yellowish. Under parts dingy yellow, brownish and and with sagittate dusky marks on the sides. Back variegated with black and yellowish. Wings black with a large oblique white bar on the coverts; the quills with numerous paired white spots on the edges of both webs. Tail black, most of the feathers white-edged, the inner webs of the middle pair, and the upper coverts, mostly white. Bill brownish; feet greenish-plumbeous; iris brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

"Sphyropicus varius. Yellow-bellied Woodpecker. Male: Crown crimson, bordered all around with black;…

The most common type of woodpeckers found in the United States, the red-headed woodpecker feeds on various fruits, as well as insects that inhabit the trees it frequents.

Redheaded Woodpeckers

The most common type of woodpeckers found in the United States, the red-headed woodpecker feeds on various…

"Picoïdes. Three-toed Woodpeckers. Three-toed: the hallux (1st toe) absent, the 4th toe reversed as usual in the family. Bill as in Picus proper, about as long as the head, stout, straight, with bevelled end and lateral ridges, and nasal tufts hiding the nostrils; very broad and much depressed at base, with the lateral ridges very low down, in most of their length close to and parallel with commissure; nostrils very near commissure; gonys about as long as from nostrils to end of bill. Wings very pointed; 1st quill spurious; 2d between 6th and 7th in length. Crown with a square yellow patch in the male; sides of head striped, of body barred, with black and white; under parts otherwise white; quills but not coverts with white spots; tail-feathers unbarred, the outer white, the central black. All the species of this genus are unquestionably modified derivatives of one circumpolar stock; the American seem to have become completely differentiated from the Asiatic and European, and further divergence seems to have perfectly separated arcticus from americanus; but dorsalis and americanus are still linked together. Elliot Coues, 1884

Three-toed Woodpeckers

"Picoïdes. Three-toed Woodpeckers. Three-toed: the hallux (1st toe) absent, the 4th toe reversed…

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage on the familiar little creature, (Figuier, 1869).

Wren

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage…

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage on the familiar little creature, (Figuier, 1869).

Wren

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage…

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage on the familiar little creature, (Figuier, 1869).

Wren

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage…

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage on the familiar little creature, (Figuier, 1869).

Wren

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage…

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage on the familiar little creature, (Figuier, 1869).

Wren

Like the Robin, the wren has become, in a sense, a sacred bird, and few venture to commit any outrage…

"Wren is a genus of birds, having a slender, slightly curved, and pointed bill; the wings very short and rounded; the tail short, and carried erect; the legs slender, and rather long. Their plumage is generally dull. They are abundant in the neotropical region, less common in the nearctic, palæarctic, and parts of the Oriental regions. They live on or near the ground, seeking for insects and worms among low brushes, and in other similar situations. The common or European wren is found in all parts of Erurope, and in Morocco and Algeria, and in Asia Minor and Northern Persia. The common wren is more abundant in the N. than in the central and S. parts of Europe. It frequents gardens, hedges, and thickets. Its flight is not long sustained; it merely flits from bush to bush, or from one stone to another, with very rapid motion of the wings. It sometimes ascends trees, nearly in the manner of creepers."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Wren

"Wren is a genus of birds, having a slender, slightly curved, and pointed bill; the wings very short…

The head of a Long-Billed Marsh Wren.

Wren

The head of a Long-Billed Marsh Wren.

The head of a Short-Billed Marsh Wren.

Wren

The head of a Short-Billed Marsh Wren.

The common name of several kinds of small birds related to the warblers. Most species are native to America, but birds of this class are found in abundance in Eurasia and northern Africa.

Wren

The common name of several kinds of small birds related to the warblers. Most species are native to…

"Troglodytes parvulus, Wren, the coloration is ordinarily brown, with a great tendency to barring; spots, stripes, and streaks are not uncommon; chestnut, bay, orange, and grey often relieve the dulness.: A. H. Evans, 1900

Wren

"Troglodytes parvulus, Wren, the coloration is ordinarily brown, with a great tendency to barring; spots,…

"Carolina Wren. Upper parts uniform reddish-brown, brightest on the rump, where are concealed whitish spots; a long whitish superciliary line, usually bordered with dusky streaks; upper surfaces of wings and tail like back, barred with dusky, the outer edges of the primaries and lateral tail-feathers showing whitish spots. Below, rusty or muddy whitish, clearest anteriorly, deepening behind, the under tail-coverts reddish-brown barred with blackish. Wing-coverts usually with dusky and whitish tips. Feet livid flesh-colored." Elliot Coues, 1884

Carolina Wren

"Carolina Wren. Upper parts uniform reddish-brown, brightest on the rump, where are concealed whitish…

Common throughout Europe, the European wren frequents hedges, gardens and bush places. They feed primarily on insects.

Common European Wren

Common throughout Europe, the European wren frequents hedges, gardens and bush places. They feed primarily…

Native to Australia, this is known to natives of New South Wales as <em>waw-gul-jelly</em>. It is shy and reclusive, and often found in marshy areas.

Emu Wren

Native to Australia, this is known to natives of New South Wales as waw-gul-jelly. It is shy…

"European Wren. Feet strictly laminiplanter, as usual in Oscines. Tail thin, with narrow parallel-edged feathers. Wings and tail more or less completely barred cross-wise. Large. Upper parts uniform in color, without streaks or bars; rump with concealed white spots. Belly unmarked; a conspicuous superciliary stripe." Elliot Coues, 1884

European Wren

"European Wren. Feet strictly laminiplanter, as usual in Oscines. Tail thin, with narrow parallel-edged…

The goldcrest or golden-crested wren is a small passerine bird in the kinglet family.

Gold Crested Wren

The goldcrest or golden-crested wren is a small passerine bird in the kinglet family.

The great Carolina wren, known for its ability to imitate various other songbirds.

Great Carolina Wren

The great Carolina wren, known for its ability to imitate various other songbirds.

"Long-billed Marsh Wren. T. palustris. Above clear brown, unbarred, the middle of the back with a large black patch sharply streaked with white (these white stripes sometimes deficient). Crown of head usually darker that the back, often quite blackish, and continuous with the black interscapular patch. a dull white superciliary line. Wings fuscous, the inner secondaries blackish on the outer webs, often barred or indented with light brown. Tail evenly barred with fuscous and the color of the back. Under parts white, usually quite pure on the belly and middle line of the breast and throat, but much shaded with brown on the sides, flanks, and crissum. Bill blackish above, pale below; feet brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Long-billed Marsh Wren

"Long-billed Marsh Wren. T. palustris. Above clear brown, unbarred, the middle of the back with a large…

The Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) is a small North American songbird of the wren family. It is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it from the Sedge Wren, also known as Short-billed Marsh Wren. Adults have brown upperparts with a light brown belly and flanks and a white throat and breast. The back is black with white stripes. They have a dark cap with a white line over the eyes and a short thin bill.

Marsh Wren

The Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) is a small North American songbird of the wren family. It is…

A small bird having grey and brown upper parts with small black and white spots. Pale grey under parts and a brown rump.

Rock Wren

A small bird having grey and brown upper parts with small black and white spots. Pale grey under parts…

"Upper parts pale brownish-gray, minutely dotted with blackish and whitish points together, and usually showing obsolete wavy bars of dusky. Rump cinnamon-brown; a whitish superciliary line. Beneath, soiled white, shading behind into pale cinnamon, the throat and breast obsoletely streaked, and the under tail-covers barred, with dusky. Quills of the wings rather darker than the back, with similar markings on the outer webs. Middle tail-feathers like the back, with many dark bars of equal width with the lighter ones; lateral tail-feathers similarly marked on the outer webs, plain on the inner webs, with a broad subterminal black bar on both webs, and cinnamon-brown tips, the latter usually marbled with dusky; outer feathers with several blackish and cinnamon bars on both webs. Bill and feet dark horn color, the former paler at base below." Elliot Coues, 1884

Rock Wren

"Upper parts pale brownish-gray, minutely dotted with blackish and whitish points together, and usually…

"Short-billed Marsh Wren. Cistothorus platensis. Upper parts brown, the crown and most of the back blackish, streaked with white. below, whitish, shaded with clear brown across the breast and along the sides, and especially on the flanks and crissum, the latter more or less indistinctly barred with dusky (often inappreciable). A whitish line over the eye. Wings and tail marked as in the last species. Upper tail-coverts decidedly barred. Bill blackish above, whitish below, extremely small, scarcely half as long as the head; feet brown." Elliot Coues, 1884

Short-billed Marsh Wren

"Short-billed Marsh Wren. Cistothorus platensis. Upper parts brown, the crown and most of the back blackish,…

The winter wren.

Winter Wren

The winter wren.

"Winter Wren. Above brown, darker before, brighter behind, most of back, together with tail and inner wing quills, banded with dusky, the markings obsolete on the back, where usually accompanied by whitish specks, strongest on the wings and tail. Outer webs of several primaries regularly barred with brownish-white, in marked contrast with the other bars of the wings. An inconspicuous whitish superciliary line. Below brownish, paler or whitish anteriorly, the belly, flanks, and crissum heavily waved with dusky and whitish bars. Bill slender, straight, decidedly shorter than the head. Tail much shorter than the wings." Elliot Coues, 1884" Elliot Coues, 1884

Winter Wren

"Winter Wren. Above brown, darker before, brighter behind, most of back, together with tail and inner…

"The Wrens are among the smallest birds."Left: Golden Wren.Top: Fire-Crested Wren.Right: Golden-Crested Wren.

Wrens

"The Wrens are among the smallest birds." Left: Golden Wren. Top: Fire-Crested Wren. Right: Golden-Crested…

"The Stonechat generally forms itts nest under some furze-bush or other shrub, or among rank grass."Left: Wagtail.Top: Whinchat.Bottom-right: Stonechat.

Wrens

"The Stonechat generally forms itts nest under some furze-bush or other shrub, or among rank grass." Left:…

Having the plumage extremely lax and soft; rounded wings much shorter thn long, narrow, graduated tail; 10 primaries, the sixth being the longest. The bill much shorter than the head.

Wrentits

Having the plumage extremely lax and soft; rounded wings much shorter thn long, narrow, graduated tail;…

Like Woodpeckers, they can hang upon trees, and sustain themselves in a vertical position for a long time; but they are incapable of climbing (Figuier, 1869).

Wryneck

Like Woodpeckers, they can hang upon trees, and sustain themselves in a vertical position for a long…

Like Woodpeckers, they can hang upon trees, and sustain themselves in a vertical position for a long time; but they are incapable of climbing (Figuier, 1869).

Wryneck

Like Woodpeckers, they can hang upon trees, and sustain themselves in a vertical position for a long…

Also known as the cuckoo's mate, the wry-neck feeds on ants and elder-berries.

Wryneck

Also known as the cuckoo's mate, the wry-neck feeds on ants and elder-berries.

"Iynx torquilla, the Cuckoo's-mate or Snake-bird, is fairly common in England, and extends thence to Japan, Kordofan, and Senegal. The Wryneck may be distinguished from the typical Woodpeckers by their soft tails without spiny shafts, and naked nostrils with a partial covering. The plumage shews a particular mixture of black , brown, grey, and white, somewhat similar to the Nightjar." A. H. Evans, 1900

A Wryneck Sitting on a Tree

"Iynx torquilla, the Cuckoo's-mate or Snake-bird, is fairly common in England, and extends thence to…

"Totanus melanoleucus. Greater Tell-tale. Greater Yellow-shanks. Long-legged Tattler. Stone-snipe. Bill straight or slightly inclined upwards, not with regular curve, but as if bent near the middle, black or greenish-black. Legs very long and slender, chrome-yellow. Above, blackish, more or less ashy according to season, everywhere speckled with whitish, in a series on indentations along edge of each feather; the markings spottle on the back and wings, streaky on the head and neck. A slight white superciliary line. Upper tail-coverts mostly white. Under parts white, the jugulum and fore-breast streaked, the sides and flanks, lining of wings and axillars barred and arrow-headed with the color of the back. Tail like back,with numerous white bars, generally broken on the middle feathers. Primaries blackish, with black shafts, mostly with white tips; secondaries and their coverts the same, but their edges marbled, spotted, or broken-barred with white. The seasonal changes of plumage are inconsiderable, consisting chiefly in the tone of the upper parts, more blackish and white in summer, more gray and ashy in winter and in the young; and in the emphasis of the dark markings of the under parts." Elliot Coues, 1884

Greater Yello-shanks

"Totanus melanoleucus. Greater Tell-tale. Greater Yellow-shanks. Long-legged Tattler. Stone-snipe. Bill…

The Yellow-throated Vireo, Vireo flavifrons, is a small American songbird. Adults are mainly olive on the head and upperparts with a yellow throat and white belly; they have dark eyes with yellow "spectacles". The tail and wings are dark with white wing bars. They have thick blue-grey legs and a stout bill. Their breeding habitat is open deciduous woods in southern Canada and the eastern United States

Yellow-throated Vireo

The Yellow-throated Vireo, Vireo flavifrons, is a small American songbird. Adults are mainly olive on…

The yellow hammer, or yellow bunting; a bird widely distributed over Europe and North America

Yellowhammer

The yellow hammer, or yellow bunting; a bird widely distributed over Europe and North America

"The Yellow Hammer, or Yellow Bunting, is a bird widely distributed over North America and Europe. It frequents hedges and low trees; it nests on the ground, and the male assists in incubation. The song consists of few notes, but is sweet and pleasing."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Yellowhammer

"The Yellow Hammer, or Yellow Bunting, is a bird widely distributed over North America and Europe. It…