The 1861-1865 Civil War Land Battles ClipArt gallery offers 262 illustrations of land battles that were fought between the Union and the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Coal Harbor, June 1st, 1864. On the 1st of June the Confederates were in heavy force between Coal Harbor and Gaines's Mill, in a strong position on the skirt of the woods, parallel to a road, and defended by riflepits and earthworks. The Sixth Corps of the Federal Army was in a semi-circle around Coal Harbor, and the Eighteenth on its right, along the road, separated from the enemy by a belt of woods from twenty to two hundred yards wide, and by a strip of open ground. At the half-past five the order was given to charge the Confederates works, and the Eighteenth advanced under a terrible fire of grape and canister, but, in spite of terrible loss, drove Longstreet's Confederates pell mell from their works through the woods. The enemy rallied at last, and were again brought up, but failed to regain the lost ground."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Coal Harbor

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Coal Harbor, June 1st, 1864. On the 1st of June the Confederates…

The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign during the American Civil War, is remembered as one of American history's bloodiest, most lopsided battles.

Battle of Cold Harbor

The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign…

"Shelling of a Confederate camp on the Potomac by Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island battery. Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island Artillery, observing on the other side of the Potomac a Confederate camp, fixed one of his guns, and after one or two trials got the range so perfectly that they fled in the greatest confusion." —Leslie, 1896

Shelling of Confederate Camp

"Shelling of a Confederate camp on the Potomac by Lieutenant Tompkins, of the First Rhode Island battery.…

"The Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Confederate cavalry crossing the Potomac, June 11th, 1863. When the Confederate cavalry force under General Jenkins crossed the Potomac, a movement happily portrayed by our artist, and hurried across Maryland, within the borders of the Keystone State all with confusion and alarm. As they advanced it was impossible to tell what point would be assailed. Pittsburg, with its machine shops and foundries; Harrisburg, the capital, with the State archives; Philadelphia with its great wealth, might any or all be reached. in this emergency the Governor exerted his full powers, the citizens to some extent rallying to his call."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Invasion

"The Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Confederate cavalry crossing the Potomac,…

"Siege of Vicksburg, attack on the Confederate Works, May 22nd, 1863. Our sketch represents the terrible but fruitless assault made on Pemberton's last line of defense around the city of Vicksburg. On May 22nd, 1863, a tremendous assault was made on the grass-covered fortifications held by the Confederate army. These works consisted of a chain of forts about eight hundred yards apart, connected by deep intrenchments and extending for seven miles. Lawler's brigade rushed up amid a cross fire, and with heavy loss planted the Stars and Stripes on the edge of a parapet; but the enemy gathered there, and the Federals were overpowered. Landrum's brigade came to the relief, but faltered. McClernand ordered up Benton and Burbridge on the right. Sherman and McPherson also advanced, and at point after point the old flag fluttered for awhile on the works. On the extreme right Steele's division, with Blair on his left, advanced as Pemberton fell back, and, like the others, could only display the bravery of the men. Covered by the ravines which intersected the ground the Federal troops would get near the works and make a gallant rush onward, reach the parapet, yet when the edge of the fort was gained the interior was swept by a line of the rifle pits in the rear and a partition breastwork, so that the Federals, even when in the fort, were almost as far from victory as before. In one case a party of twelve Iowans led by a youth named Griffiths, took and held a fort, but all finally fell under the fire of their assailants except Griffiths, who, with musket and revolver, captured fourteen Confederates when had discharged their pieces, and brought them off. The Confederates used for almost the first time hand grenades, which they rolled down the sides of the works on the assaulting party in the ditch or clinging to the side. This dreadful day swept away thousands of gallant Federals. The siege now began in earnest. No army could stand such losses. Closer were the lines drawn around the enemy. Siege guns were mounted. The mines began their work, and the fortifications were assailed from beneath."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack on Confederate Works

"Siege of Vicksburg, attack on the Confederate Works, May 22nd, 1863. Our sketch represents the terrible…

"Confederates in ambush firing on a reconnoitring expedition to Oyster Creek, Roanoke Island, N.C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederates

"Confederates in ambush firing on a reconnoitring expedition to Oyster Creek, Roanoke Island, N.C."—…

"Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 4th, 1862. Scene in the roundabouts of Fort Robinett after the repulse of the Confederates. We present an exact copy of a photograph showing the scene which presented itself to the Federals at Fort Robinett. As our readers are aware, the battle of Corinth, which took place on the 3rd and 4th of October, was one of the most sanguinary, in proportion to the numbers engaged, that occurred in the West, and it was contested on both sides with great valor and skill. The Federal troops were led by General Rosecrans, and those of the enemy by Van Dorn, Price and Villepigue. The Confederates lost two acting brigadier generals, Johnson and Rogers, who, by a singular coincidence, both fell at the same time and within a few feet of each other. In addition to those officers, they lost Colonels Ross, Morton and McLaine, and Major James. An officer of the Third Michigan Cavalry said: 'Fort Robinett was garrisoned by the First United States Artillery, and here the greatest slaughter took place. In the roundabouts of the fort were found the remains of Generals Johnson and Rogers, and close to them were the bodies of fifty-six of their men, principally of the Second Texas and Fourth Mississippi Regiments. General Rogers was a brave man; he was killed while planting the Confederate flag upon the parapet of the fort, from which the enemy were finally repulsed with great slaughter.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Corinth

"Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 4th, 1862. Scene in the roundabouts of Fort Robinett after the repulse…

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon and Colonel Dumont, after the battle. After the Confederates had crossed the fourth ford General Garnett again endeavored to rally his men, standing waving his hand on an exposed point near the river bank, by his side only one young man (Chaplet), wearing the uniform of the Georgia Sharpshooters. Three of Dumont's men fired at the same time, and Garnett and his companion fell at the first round. The men rushed across, and on turning the body discovered that the Confederate leader of Western Virginia had paid the penalty; he was shot through the heart. Major Gordon, U.S.A., closed his eyes reverently, and Colonel Dumont, coming up, had him carried into a grove close by, where they laid him down, taking care of his sword and watch, to be sent with his body to his family." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Corrick's Ford

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon…

"Blowing up the Confederate forts on Craney Island, by Commodore Goldsborough, June 2nd 1862." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Craney Island

"Blowing up the Confederate forts on Craney Island, by Commodore Goldsborough, June 2nd 1862." —…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement. We illustrated the opening of this battle on page 159, and now add a sketch of the centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement, described by our correspondent, as follows: "General Melroy had the centre, and pressed steadily forward from the ground where he first took position, planting his guns each time nearer the enemy's batteries. His artillery delivered its fire with a precision truly remarkable. The ground where the enemy's guns were planted was furrowed with our shot and shell as with a plow, and where one battery stood I counted twelve dead horses. General Melroy's infantry deployed through the woods, taking advantage of a deep gully to cross a wheatfield, where they were exposed, and charged gallantly up the hill, where one of the opposing batteries was planted, cutting down the gunners with their fire. Had they been supported they would have captured a battery. They made the crest of the hill too hot to hold on the part of the enemy, and held their position until recalled." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement.…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew Jackson Smith. This fort was captured, March 14th, 1864, by the Federal forces under General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Vicksburg on March 10th, landed at Summerville, La., on the 13th, and marched to Bayou Glace, where General Scurri's Confederate brigade had been encamped, which fled on the approach of the transports, leaving considerable camp equipage and commissary stores. General Smith pushed forward to Yellow Bayou, where strong fortifications had been erected; but the Confederates again fled. As he came up the enemy was pressed, and some skirmishing occurred, resulting in the capture of several prisoners and a small wagon train. At daylight the entire command started for Fort de Russy, twenty-eight miles distant, hotly pursued by General Dick Taylor, who hoped to save the fort; but Smith had the lead, and at four o'clock in the afternoon the Third and Ninth Indiana Batteries opened on the fort, which replied vigorously with three of its heaviest guns. The cannonade continued an hour, when General Smith ordered the First and Second illinois Regiments, Sixteenth Corps, under General Mower, to charge the enemy's rifle pits and storm the fort. The Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Nineteenth Indiana and Twenty-fourth Missouri Regiments charged over deep ditches and a thick abatis in the face of a galling fire, and within twenty minutes after the order was given the [African American] sergeant of the Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteers planted the American flag upon the enemy's works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort de Russy

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew…

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Beard, repelling the attack of Confederate troops in the vicinity of Doboy River, GA." —Leslie, 1896

Doboy River

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under the command of…

"The war in Virginia. The Twenty-second [African American] Regiment, Duncan's Brigade, carrying the first line of Confederate works before Petersburg. On the morning of the 15th of June, 1864, General Hinks formed his command in line of battle, and advanced upon the Confederates, with Duncan commanding his right and Holman his left. The result of this charge was waited for with great anxiety. The majority of the whites expected that the [African American] troops would run, but the sable forces astonished everybody by their achievements. With a wild yell that must have struck terror into the hearts of their foes, the Twenty-second and Fifth United States [African American] regiments, commanded by Colonels Kidder and Connor, charged, under a hot fire of musketry and artillery, over the Confederate ditch and parapet, and drove the enemy before them, capturing a large field-piece, and taking entire possession of their works, its defenders, Ferrybee's Fourth North Carolina Cavalry, and Graham's Petersburg Battery, seeking safety in rapid flight, leaving their dead and wounded in the works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Duncan's Brigade

"The war in Virginia. The Twenty-second [African American] Regiment, Duncan's Brigade, carrying the…

"The war in Virginia. A regiment of the Eighteenth Corps carrying a portion of Beauregard's line in front of Petersburg. The first line of Confederate works, on the right, was carried by Burnside's corps. Said an officer: 'It was now about five o'clock P. M. We opened our battery at once and commenced shelling the Confederate fort. In five minutes we had three wounded. We kept on firing for about half an hour, when our infantry- Griffin's brigade- made a charge and captured the fort, taking give guns and about 200 prisoners. We had, we found, dismounted the Confederate guns by our shells.' The works on the left were carried, after a desperate fight, by the Eighteenth Corps, of which we give a near view."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Eighteenth corps

"The war in Virginia. A regiment of the Eighteenth Corps carrying a portion of Beauregard's line in…

"The war in Virginia, the Eighteenth Army Corps storming a fort on the right of the Confederate line before Petersburg, June 15th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Eighteenth Corps

"The war in Virginia, the Eighteenth Army Corps storming a fort on the right of the Confederate line…

"Gallant charge of the Sixth Michigan cavalry over the enemy's breastworks, near falling Waters, Md., July 14th, 1863. The exploits of the Federal cavalry in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania in 1863 would fill a volume in themselves. Among the many gallant charges there are few more brilliant than that of the Sixth Michigan at Falling Waters, where they rode, without drawing rein, right over the Confederate breastworks, scattering all before them. The cavalry were not more than sixty at most, but they charged up a steep hill in the face of a terrific fire; and though they lost in killed and wounded nearly two-thirds of their number, they captured almost the entire force of the enemy, with three regimental battle flags."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Falling Waters

"Gallant charge of the Sixth Michigan cavalry over the enemy's breastworks, near falling Waters, Md.,…

"Confederate cavalry attacking a Federal supply train, near Jasper, Tenn. We give a sketch of the capture of a Federal supply train of several hundred wagons, loaded with ammunition and subsistence, by a large body of Wheeler's Confederate cavalry, near Jasper, Tenn., while on the way to Chattanooga. The guard made a stubborn resistance, but being few in number were soon overpowered by the Confederates, whose headlong attack and numerical superiority threw the whole train into confusion and prevented escape. The cavalry were supposed to have crossed the Cumberland at Kingston, above General Burnside, and come down in his rear. This daring act showed how materially a large force of cavalry was needed in the Army of the Cumberland."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal supply train

"Confederate cavalry attacking a Federal supply train, near Jasper, Tenn. We give a sketch of the capture…

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts crossing the Rappahannock in advance of the Grand Army, to drive off the Confederate riflemen who were firing upon the Federal pontioniers, Wednesday, December 10th, 1862. We illustrate one of those numerous acts of daring which have raised the character of the Federal soldier to the highest position in the military world. When the fire of the enemy from the rifle pits on the south side of the Rappahannock became so deadly that the pontoniers could not carry on their work, General Burnside called for 100 volunteers to cross and dislodge, at the bayonet's point, the concealed sharpshooters. Thousands sprang forward, but only the number required was chosen. These consisted of men from the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiments. With the utmost alacrity this gallant 'forlorn hope' sprang into the boats, and, on reaching the other side, drove the Confederates from their posts at the point of the bayonet, capturing 39 prisoners. Only one man was killed and give wounded in this desperate duty. The bridge was soon finished, and a sufficient force passed over to hold the town."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Forlorn Hope

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth…

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts crossing the Rappahannock in advance of the Grand Army, to drive off the Confederate riflemen who were firing upon the Federal pontioniers, Wednesday, December 10th, 1862. We illustrate one of those numerous acts of daring which have raised the character of the Federal soldier to the highest position in the military world. When the fire of the enemy from the rifle pits on the south side of the Rappahannock became so deadly that the pontoniers could not carry on their work, General Burnside called for 100 volunteers to cross and dislodge, at the bayonet's point, the concealed sharpshooters. Thousands sprang forward, but only the number required was chosen. These consisted of men from the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiments. With the utmost alacrity this gallant 'forlorn hope' sprang into the boats, and, on reaching the other side, drove the Confederates from their posts at the point of the bayonet, capturing 39 prisoners. Only one man was killed and give wounded in this desperate duty. The bridge was soon finished, and a sufficient force passed over to hold the town."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Forlorn Hope

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth…

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts crossing the Rappahannock in advance of the Grand Army, to drive off the Confederate riflemen who were firing upon the Federal pontioniers, Wednesday, December 10th, 1862. We illustrate one of those numerous acts of daring which have raised the character of the Federal soldier to the highest position in the military world. When the fire of the enemy from the rifle pits on the south side of the Rappahannock became so deadly that the pontoniers could not carry on their work, General Burnside called for 100 volunteers to cross and dislodge, at the bayonet's point, the concealed sharpshooters. Thousands sprang forward, but only the number required was chosen. These consisted of men from the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiments. With the utmost alacrity this gallant 'forlorn hope' sprang into the boats, and, on reaching the other side, drove the Confederates from their posts at the point of the bayonet, capturing 39 prisoners. Only one man was killed and give wounded in this desperate duty. The bridge was soon finished, and a sufficient force passed over to hold the town."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Forlorn Hope

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth…

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments at Fort Donelson, February 15th, 1862, resulting in the capture of the works on the following morning. The Iowa Second Regiment led the charge, followed by the rest in their order. The sight was sublime. Onward they sped, heedless of the bullets and balls of the enemy above. The hill was so steep, the timber cleared, that the Confederates left a gap in their lines of rifle pits on this crest of hill. Through this gap they were bound to go. Right up they went, climbing upon all fours, their line of dark-blue clothing advancing regularly forward, the white line of smoke from the top of the works opposed by a line of the Federal troops. "They reach the top. Numbers fall. The surprise was breathless. See, they climb over the works- they fall- they are lost! Another group, and still another and another, close up the gap. All is covered in smoke. The lodgment is made; the troops swarm up the hillside, their bright bayonets glittering in the sun. The firing slackens. Close behind the brigade Captain Stone's batery of rifled 10-pounders was tugging up the hill, the horses plunging, the riders whipping. Upward they go, where never vehicle went before- up the precipitous and clogged sides of the hill. No sooner on the crest than the guns were unlimbered, the men at their posts. Percussion shells and canister were shot spitefully from the Parrott guns at the flying enemy. The day was gained, cheers upon cheers rent the air, and in a few minutes all was hushed."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Storming of Fort Donelson

"Storming of Fort Donelson- decisive bayonet charge of the Iowa Second Regiment on the Confederate intrenchments…

"First assault upon Fort Fisher, Sunday, January 15th, 1865. The One Hundred and Seventeenth New York troops, followed by the Third, planting the flag on the northern traverse of the fort. On the 13th of January the Federal fleet commenced the bombardment, which was continued with unabated vigor throughout the day. On the 15th it was resolved to take the place by storm. The boats containing the naval force intended to co-operate effected a landing on a shelving piece of beach about a mile and a half from the fort. At two o'clock, and when within eight hundred yards of the fort, the order to charge was given. The First Brigade of the Second Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, headed by General Curtis, scaled the northeast salient of the fort, and forced a rapid entrance. Inch by inch they fought their way along the northeast face, the gallant First Brigade in the advance. It was a hand-to-hand struggle; bayonets were in general use; muskets were clubbed; and man stood up to man in deadly conflict. Night fell, and yet the fierce struggle raged unremittingly within the fort. About ten o'clock the final struggle took place, and, after a short but desperate hand-to-hand encounter, the Federals remained masters of the hitherto impregnable Fort Fisher."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Fisher

"First assault upon Fort Fisher, Sunday, January 15th, 1865. The One Hundred and Seventeenth New York…

As June wore on, Grant pressed the siege with vigor. Johnston tried to help Pemberton, but could not. Grant proceeded to mine under some of the Confederate works to blow them up. One of these, known as Fort Hill Bastion, was in front of McPherson, ad on the afternoon of June 25 it was exploded with terrible effect, making a great breach, at which a fierce struggle ensued.

Blowing Up Fort Hill Bastion

As June wore on, Grant pressed the siege with vigor. Johnston tried to help Pemberton, but could not.…

"Interior of Fort Sumter after the bombardment in 1863." -Gordy, 1916

Fort Sumter

"Interior of Fort Sumter after the bombardment in 1863." -Gordy, 1916

Confederate forces bombarding Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861

Bombardment of Fort Sumter, April 12, 1861

Confederate forces bombarding Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861

The bombardment of Fort Wagner, infantry in trenches.

Bombardment of Fort Wagner

The bombardment of Fort Wagner, infantry in trenches.

The Second Battle of Franklin (more popularly known simply as The Battle of Franklin) was fought at Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864, as part of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of the American Civil War.

Battlefield of Franklin

The Second Battle of Franklin (more popularly known simply as The Battle of Franklin) was fought at…

The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, from December 11 to December 15, 1862, between General Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, is remembered as one of the most one-sided battles of the American Civil War.

The Attack on Fredericksburg

The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, from December 11 to December…

The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, from December 11 to December 15, 1862, between General Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, is remembered as one of the most one-sided battles of the American Civil War.

Scene in Fredericksburg on the Morning of Dec. 12, 1862

The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, from December 11 to December…

Abner Doubleday (1819 - 1893) was a career United States Army office and Union General in the Civil War. This sketch depicts Doubleday's division during a skirmish at Fredericksburg.

Doubleday's Skirmishes at Fredericksburg

Abner Doubleday (1819 - 1893) was a career United States Army office and Union General in the Civil…

The Battle of Fredericksburg was fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia from December 11 to December 15, 1862 between General Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Major General Ambrose E. Burnside. It is remembered as one of the most one-sided battles of the Civil War.

Battle of Fredericksburg

The Battle of Fredericksburg was fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia from December 11 to December…

"Bombardment of Fredericksburg, Va., by the army of the Potomac, commanded by General Burnside, Thursday, December 11th, 1862. Our correspondent's report of this event: 'At ten o'clock General Burnside gives the order, "Concentrate the fire of all your guns on the city and batter it down!" You may believe they were not loath to obey. The artillery of the right- eight batteries- was commanded by Colonel Hays; Colonel Tompkins, right centre, eleven batteries; Colonel Tyler, left centre, seven batteries; Captain De Russy, left, nine batteries. In a few moments these thirty-five batteries forming a total of one hundred and seventy-nine guns, ranging from 10-pounder Parrotts to 41-inch siege guns, posted along the convex side of the arc of the circle formed by the bend of the river and land opposite Fredericksburg, opened on the doomed city. The effect was, of course, terrific, and, regarded merely as a phenomenon, was among the most awfully grand conceivable. Perhaps what will give you the liveliest idea of its effect is a succession, absolutely without intermission, of the very loudest thunder peals. It lasted thus for upward of an hour, fifty rounds being fired from each gun, and I know not how many hundred tons of iron were thrown into the town. The congregate generals were transfixed; mingled satisfaction and awe was upon every face. But what was tantalizing was, that though a great deal could be heard, nothing could be seen, the city being still eveloped in fog and mist. Only a denser pillar of smoke defining itself on the background of the fog indicated where the town had been fired by our shells. Another and another column showed itself, and we presently saw that at least a dozen houses must be on fire. Toward noon the curtain rolled up, and we saw that it was indeed so. Fredericksburg was in conflagration. Tremendous though this firing had been, and terrific though its effect obviously was on the town, it had not accomplished the object intended. It was found by our gunners almost impossible to obtain a sufficient depression of their pieces to shell the front part of the city, and the Confederate sharpshooters were still comparatively safe behind the thick stone walls of the houses.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fredericksburg

"Bombardment of Fredericksburg, Va., by the army of the Potomac, commanded by General Burnside, Thursday,…

The Battle of Gaines' Mill, also known as the First Battle of Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy River took place on June 27, 1862 in Hanover County, Virginia as the third of the Seven Days Battles of the Civil War.

Battle of Gaines' Mill

The Battle of Gaines' Mill, also known as the First Battle of Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy…

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment and gun was in place. Some were in the broad, open field and others under the cover of the woods. The day was intensely warm, and many of the men, worn out with their previous day's fighting, lack of sleep and toilsome march, had already thrown themselves upon the ground and were indulging in a short slumber, when a sharp volley and then the roar of artillery announced that the Confederates had opened the fight. Their shells burst in front of the farmhouse which General Morell had made his headquarters. The Federal batteries, after some little delay, replied and for an hour this artillery duel and shelling the woods continued. It was not till near three o'clock in the afternoon that the engagement became general, and then the battle raged for four hours with unexampled fury. As though by common consent, there was a pause now; but it did not last long, for the enemy had evidently received large re-enforcements, as the whole Federal line was attacked, with a vigor which showed that those who made it were fresh men. To prevent defeat, General Porter sent for re-enforcements, for under the additional pressure the Federal troops were giving way. Fortunately, General Slocum's division came to the rescue, and with it Generals Palmer, French and Meagher with their brigades and two bodies of cavalry. This changed the character of the struggle. Meagher's gallant gellows, coats off and sleeves rolled up, charged the enemy and drove them back. General Palmer's men and Duryee's Zouaves also went in with valor, and finally the Confederates rolled back like a retreating wave. This was the close of the day's fight. Toward the end the Federals had fifty-four regiments on the field, numbering about 36,000 men." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gaines's Mill

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment…

"The campaign in Georgia. A baggage train crossing the mountains in a storm. General Sherman, after the capture of Atlanta, prepared for the next move of his antagonist. Hood suddenly moved north, assailing Sherman's lines of communication; but he was repulsed at important points, and, being followed closely by Sherman, retreated southward. The mountain region was again the scene of operations just as winter was approaching. The immense labor and fatigue attendant on operations in that district may be conceived by our sketch of a baggage train crossing the mountains in a storm."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Campaign in Georgia

"The campaign in Georgia. A baggage train crossing the mountains in a storm. General Sherman, after…

"The war in Georgia- Stevenson, Ala., depot for General Rosecrans's Army. The campaign of General Rosecrans brought him to a district where it was not easy to remember the State in which places were. Chattanooga the object of the struggle, was in Tennessee; but the battle of Chickamauga was fought in Georgia, and Rosecrans's depot of supplies was in Alabama. As a man may actually stand in three States, we may credit the assertion that from Lookout Mountain your eye can discern seven of the sovereignties of the New World. In the railroad line from Memphis, which at Cleveland branches to Lynchburg, Raleigh, Charleston, Savannah and Montgomery, Stevenson is an important point, as there a railroad from Nashville comes in."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Georgia

"The war in Georgia- Stevenson, Ala., depot for General Rosecrans's Army. The campaign of General Rosecrans…

"The war in Georgia. Wagon train passing Resaca at night. Our correspondent wrote: 'No general probably ever attempted a task like Sherman's, so far removed from the base of his operations. The line of railroad is so precarious a dependence that we can well understand the present attempt of the Confederate Wheeler to save Atlanta, and perhaps destroy Sherman by demolishing the road to Chattanooga, burning bridges, blocking up tunnels, etc. The supplies are forwarded to Sherman under great danger, and the advantage is taken of the darkest nights. Our sketch would be interesting from its picturesque beauty, did not the importance invest it with an interest of a far deeper character. A wagon train is passing through the now battle-famous Resaca, guided in the darkness by the light of torches.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Georgia

"The war in Georgia. Wagon train passing Resaca at night. Our correspondent wrote: 'No general probably…

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

Battle of Gettysburg

Depiction of the battle of Gettysburg.

"Battle of Gettysburg, Cemetery Hill during the attack of the Confederates, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863. No attack was made until about half-past three o'clock, when Lee ordered a simultaneous advance against each flank of the Federal army, while demonstrations were being kept up against the centre. The attacks were not, however, made simultaneously, as Lee had intended. Longstreet began by sending Hood's force against Sickles's extreme left, then held by General Ward, of Birney's division, whose three brigades extended their line from the Round Top across the Devil's Den, to and beyond the Peach Orchard, along the Emmittsburg Road. Ward's force was driven back after a bitter contest, and before De Trobriand, who stood next in line, could give him any assistance. Upon turning Ward's left Hood fell upon De Trobriand's flank and rear, leading part of his force between that portion of the field and the Round Top, while McLaws, with Anderson's support, was assaulting De Trobriand's centre. The attack was made with such vigor that Sickles called for re-enforcements, and Burling's brigade of Humphreys's division, as well as the two brigades of Barnes's division, under Tilton and Sweitzer, were therefore sent him. A terrible struggle followed, and the ground was contested bitterly at all points."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Battle of Gettysburg, Cemetery Hill during the attack of the Confederates, Thursday evening, July 2nd,…

"Battle of Gettysburg- charge of the Confederates on Cemetery Hill, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863. The odds against the Federals were great, but in face of heavy losses they fought with a bravery rarely equaled. The Confederates were at last beaten back from the face of the hill, but, passing along the ravines they penetrated between both the Round Tops, thus flanking the Federals. The conflict was renewed more bitterly than before. The Federal ammunition again gave out, but the bayonet was once more made to play such an effective part, that at nightfall the Confederates had entirely withdrawn from Little Round Top. What Warren justly deemed to be, and what really was, at that juncture, the most important position in the field, had thus been successfully maintained, though at a frightful cost of life. While Johnson was operating against Culp's Hill, Early made an attempt to carry Cemetery Hill, after opening upon it with his artillery from Brenner's Hill. He was beaten back and compelled to seek his original position before darkness had fairly set in."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Battle of Gettysburg- charge of the Confederates on Cemetery Hill, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863.…

"Battle of Gettysburg, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863, as seen from Rocky Hill, on Meade's left. Our illustration shows the fight on Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863, and we almost may say on Friday evening, from Rocky Hill, on the left of General Meade's position, where the Fifth Corps was posted. The lines of the enemy can be seen coming over the hill and out of the woods, in their fierce onset on the Federal line in the rocky field. The fire that met the Confederates at the foot of the ridge was so hot that the entire line of the now fairly exhausted Confederates for a moment wavered and then recoiled. Seeing this, Meade ordered a general advance, in which the remainder of Doubleday's force participated. After another spirited contest it succeeded just before sunset in driving back the Confederates nearly up to their line of reserves, and in taking some of the guns that had been previously captured. Thus ended the engagement on the left centre. A new line was then formed with the divisions of Doubleday and Robinson, and by part of the Twelfth Corps, then under General Williams, who had taken Slocum's place when the latter assumed command of the entire right wing. Contrary to Lee's expectation, Ewell on the extreme left did not advance until quite a while after Longstreet had attacked Birney's division. Johnson's force crossed Rock Creek, and with its extreme right moved against Wadsworth and Green, the latter being the only brigade of Geary's division left at Culp's Hill. Geary's other brigades, under Colonel Charles Candy and George Cobham, had previously been ordered away by Meade toward Little Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Battle of Gettysburg, Thursday evening, July 2nd, 1863, as seen from Rocky Hill, on Meade's left. Our…

"Invasion of Pennsylvania- Battle of Gettysburg, Friday, July 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"Invasion of Pennsylvania- Battle of Gettysburg, Friday, July 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The Battle of Gettysburg, Friday morning, July 3rd, 1863. In our illustration may be studied the struggle on Friday morning. On the Federal right the battle raged furiously from early dawn. Ewell was determined to advance from the rifle-pits he had taken the night before, and Slocum was equally resolute to recover them. Geary and Birney here met the first assault firmly. For six hours the struggle was desperate on both sides. The Confederates seemed to laugh at death, and again and again charged through the smoke of artillery with shouts that swelled above the uproar. Wheaton's Brigade, of the Sixth, ws hurried up to the rescue, and the Federal line which had been forced back for a moment, again advanced; more troops were pushed forwad, artillery brought up on a gallop, and posted so as to enfilade the hostile ranks. At eleven o'clock the enemy gave it up, and his shattered bleeding battalions fell back in despair."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gettysburg

"The Battle of Gettysburg, Friday morning, July 3rd, 1863. In our illustration may be studied the struggle…

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as part of the Gettysburg Campaign, was the battle with the largest number of casualties in the American Civil War.

Where the Battle of Gettysburg Began

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,…

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On the 3rd of November, 1863, the enemy, about six thousand strong, under General Green, attacked in force; but the Seventeenth Ohio Battery kept them at bay, supported by the Eighty-third Ohio, the Sixtieth Indiana watching the flank. A lull soon occurred, and the Sixtieth was sent to hold a bridge and small bayou on the skirt of the woods. This they did, and at last, by Burbridge's order, advanced till friend and foe were so mingled in strife that cannon could not be used; but finally the Sixtieth Indiana, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, who come to its aid, fell back, the Twenty-third losing their brave colonel, Guppy. In this retrograde movement the enemy's mounted Texan infantry surrounded the Sixty-seventh Indiana. General Burbridge in vain endeavored to save them with a section of the Seventeenth Ohio Battery, but the Confederates closed around them so that he had to suspend his fire for fear of killing his own men, and Lieutenant Colonel Bushler, with two hundred men, surrendered to the enemy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On…

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted Infantry, November 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted…

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Bethesda Church, between Crawford's division, Fifth Corps, and the Confederates, May 30th, 1864. At two P. M. the enemy attacked Crawford's division, and he, in accordance with instructions, fell back, and a line of battle was formed, Griffin on the right, Cutler in the centre, Crawford on the left, General Burnside's corps being to the right of Warren's. At six P. M. the enemy assaulted Griffin on the right. It was a general and sudden attack. They advanced in two lines of battle and heavy skirmish line. Simultaneous with their opening volley of musketry came solid shot and shell from the angry mouths of a score and more of hostile cannon. Firm and unshaken as a wall of brass stood the Federal troops. Schooled to such sudden attacks and ready for it, the Federals coolly waited to return the fire. It was a most murderous volley. The assaulting column were staggered and fell back. Upon General Crawford's division the assaults were more repeated and more fierce. The enemy sought to turn his left, but each time was handsomely repulsed, and more than special glory was won by the men meeting and expelling these assaults.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grant's Campaign

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. The Battle of Bethesda Church, between Crawford's division, Fifth Corps,…

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. Repulse of Lee's night attack on Smith's Brigade, Hancock's Corps, Friday, June 3rd, 1864. After the fearful battle of Friday, when Grant so gallantly attempted to force the passage of the Chickahominy and actually carried some of Lee's works, a lull ensued, and night was fast coming on in a universal stillness. But, suddenly, when nearly eight o'clock and as twilight was just vanishing, Hancock's Corps heard in the Confederate Corps heard in the Confederate works just by them the words of command. At once all was in motion, every man at his post. They had not long to wait. Over the intervening crest, clearly defined in the gathering darkness, came Beauregard's men. As the line appeared, Smith's Brigade of Gibbons's Division poured in a volley which pierced the darkness like a flash of lightning. Volley after volley is given, but they press on the Division of Barlow and Gibbons and the left of Wright's Corps. These gallant fellows welcomed their antagonists of the morning, and drove them back with terrible loss. This repulse of the Confederates closed the bloody work of the day, which stands the fiercest action of war."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grant's Campaign

"Grant's Campaign in Virginia. Repulse of Lee's night attack on Smith's Brigade, Hancock's Corps, Friday,…

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, October 4th, 1861. On Friday, october 4th, 1861, Major West, of Campbell's Pennsylvania Artillery, was ordered to shell a barn, in which there was every reason to conclude a large quantity of Confederate provisions and supplies was stored. The major, therefore, placed a Parrott gun on the heights of Great Falls, and threw a few shells across the Potomac. Several of them fell into the barn, which had the effect of unhousing a number of Confederate cavalry, who rode with all speed for the neighboring woods." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Great Falls

"Shelling Confederate cavalry across the Potomac River from the heights of Great Falls, by Major West,…

"Desperate hand-to-hand combat between Federal cavalry, commanded by General Averill and the daring Confederate general Fitzhugh Lee belong the chief honors of this brilliant affair. Once across the river, a regular cavalry and artillery fight took place between General Averill's command and the Confederate forces under the command of Generals Stuart and Fitzhugh Lee; and for once during the war there was a fair cavalry fight.  The forces opposed to each other were about equal in numbers and similarly appointed and equipped. The Confederates, made desperate by the advance of Federal troops across the Rappahannock and upon soil which they had sworn to defend with the last drop of their blood, disputed every rood of ground. Again and again they charged on the Federal lines, formed <em>en echelon</em>, and as often were they repulsed in the most gallant manner. When the Federals charged upon the enemy's lines it was done with such impetuosity that successful resistance was impossible. Sword in hand they dashed upon the foe, who, after attempting to stand up against the first charges, doggedly retired before them. The object of the expedition having been accomplished, General Averill retired to the left bank of the river without molestation from the enemy."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

hand-to-hand combat

"Desperate hand-to-hand combat between Federal cavalry, commanded by General Averill and the daring…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…